2020 NWW Design Awards Winners Announced

Collage image of six award winners, described in text below

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Northwest Washington Section hosted its virtual Design Awards on October 15 to celebrate excellence in Design.

The jury included Karen Braitmayer (Seattle, Studio Pacifica), Linda Smeins (Bellingham, Professor Emeritus, Western Washington University), and Susan McCants (Seattle, Splice). The jury worked with AIA Northwest Washington members Dave Christensen AIA (Christensen Design Management) and Julie Blazek AIA (HKP Architects), who guided the Design Awards process.

From 17 submissions, the jury chose six projects for recognition with Merit, across commercial and residential design. The jury remarked that the submissions highlighted the scope and quality of architectural design accomplished by the architects of our Northwest Washington region, and while each of the projects had elements deserving commendation, they agreed that six of the submissions are worthy of the Merit Award.

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to our esteemed jury and Design Awards committee!

Click here to view the full Design Awards catalogue.
Click here to view the full recording of the awards ceremony and keynote lecture.

Bloom House interior with large windows onto natural landscape, with wood-paneled floors and ceiling

 

Bloom Residence by Pelletier + Schaar was awarded for its accessible design that takes advantage of sweeping views on Camano Island, Washington. The jurors commented the project is a strong example of how a modest residential project can be elevated through the use of light, materials and a clear plan diagram. It is notable in what it accomplishes on a small scale.

 

 

David Pelletier, Pelletier + Schaar, Architect of Record
Pearl Schaar, Pelletier + Schaar, Lead Designer/Project Manager
Tracy Tiffany, Tiffany Construction, Contractor
Gabriela Siia, ZVELT Engineering Design PLLC, Structural Engineer
Photo credit: Tim Sherrill

Wood cabin in forest enclave with expansive patio. Lake Cavanaugh Addition project described at right.

Lake Cavanaugh Addition by HKP Architects was awarded for its addition of a guest cabin and activity space to the two existing cabins in Mt. Vernon, Washington. The solution was to add the third cabin connected to the others with a covered walkway. The jury was impressed by the way the three cabins blend with the landscape and form an iconic Northwest scene, plus the consideration the walkways provide for aging-in-place.

 

Design Team:
Brian Poppe, HKP Architects, Partner-in-Charge
Austin Miles, HKP Architects, Project Manager
Omar Velasco, HKP Architects, Project Support

Collaborators:
Jordan Janicki, DCG Engineers, Structural Engineering
Danny Ochoa, DCG Engineers, Civil Engineering
Misty Philbin, The Philbin Group, Landscape Architect
Patricia Lenssen, ASLA, SITES AP, Pacific Landscape Architecture, Project Manager
Kenny Chriest, Cavanaugh Custom Homes, General Contractor
Simply Yards, Landscape Contractor
Photo credit: Mike Penney, Mike Penney Photography

Rust-hued guest house adorned by three planters, with back patio, placed in front of setting sun. Described at right.

Mazama Meadow Guest House by Designs Northwest Architects was awarded for its “appealing” overall design of this vacation retreat in North Central Washington. The jury responded to the feeling of being part of the nature outside but in the comfort of your home. The challenges of the location were addressed by cooling design strategies to keep the home comfortable throughout the year, and the use of low maintenance materials for sustainability.

 


Dan Nelson
, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
Matt Radach, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Designer
Impel Construction, General Contractor
Alpine Welding, Metalwork
Photo credit: S. Brousseau Photography

Cabin-shaped library, set beyond asphalt parking lot. Many wood supports and pointed roof, described at right.

Orcas Island Public Library Expansion by HKP Architects was awarded for its “graceful” and “organic” expansion of the library in Eastsound, Washington. Challenges included the form of the existing building, and the steep slope on the west side of the property. The jury was struck by the successful siting of the addition to create a main entry and drive court, as well as interior spaces that provide a range of loud to quiet environments, and use of natural daylight.

 

 

Juile Blazek, Christine Baldwin, HKP Architects, Architect
MIG/SvR, Civil and Landscape
Lund Opsahl LLC, Structural Engineers
Harris Group, Inc., Mechanical Engineers
K Engineers, Electrical Engineers
The Greenbusch Group, Acoustical and AV
Materials Testing & Consulting, Geotechnical
Adams Consulting & Estimating, Hardware Consultant
Applied Building Information, Specifications
Photo credit: Mike Penney Photography

Stacked, mixed-use building of various shades of brown and red, with mixed materials. Retail on the groundfloor, with a staircase leading to a plaza and apartment spaces on the upper floors. Described at right.

Plaza Mixed Use by Designs Northwest Architects in association with TCA Architecture was awarded for its “notable” complex of micro and studio apartments, plus retail space, in Kirkland, Washington. The jury remarked it meets high standards for sustainability, while providing needed affordable housing. They were impressed with the spaces to encourage community, and the high level of finishing.

 

 

Dan Nelson, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
William Lippens, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Architect
Brian Harris, TCA Architecture, Principal Architect
Jason Warner, TCA Architecture, Senior Project Manager
Kirkland Sustainable Investments LLC, Contractor
Swenson Say Faget, Structural Engineer
Vanessa Pantley, Interior Design
Kathleen Bradley Reader, Bradley Design Group, Landscape Architect
Photo credit: Swift Studio and John McKinney

Twin pitched-roof buildings in gray-brown, accented by blue-yellow-red overhangs jutting out the front of the buildings, behind a strip of asphalt, in front of blue, party cloudy sky. Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Dental Clinic Expansion described at right.

 

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Dental Clinic Expansion by HKP Architects was awarded for its dental clinic expansion with a “tasteful aesthetic look” in La Conner, Washington. The jury focused on the appealing colors, the sustainable strategies incorporated, and consideration of accessibility while maintaining the cultural design of the existing building. The design also responded to the challenges of the steeply sloped site and an archeologically sensitive boundary.

 

Juile Blazek, Austin Miles, HKP Architects, Architect
DGC, Inc., Civil and Structural Engineers
Berona Engineers, Mechanical Engineers
TFWB, Electrical Engineers
Henry Schein/A-dec, Dental Equipment
Roen Associates, Cost Estimating
Photo credit: Mike Penney Photography


Special thanks to our 2020 Design Awards sponsors!

Title - Freeland & Associates; Platinum - HB Hansen, GeoTest, Tiger Construction, Fisher Construction, Aldrich; Gold - TFWB Engineers, GeoEngineers, Lund Opsahl, Dawson, FSI Engineers, The Greenbusch Group, HKP Architects, Ram Construction, Kingworks Structural Engineers, K Engineers, Judd & Black Appliance

Posted in Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – October 2020

 

VOTE!

Don’t forget to submit your ballot by Nov. 3. If you are not registered, the deadline is Oct. 26 for mail or online registrations, but you can register to vote up to Nov. 3 if you show up in person at your county elections office. Ballots must be postmarked or placed in a drop box by Nov. 3. Statewide drop box locations are here; King County’s drop box locations are here. Voters’ guides: King County’s is here; check your county’s elections office webpage for other counties. Finally, remember that you can verify that your ballot was received and accepted. King County’s verification page is here; check your county’s elections office webpage for other counties. Ballots will be mailed starting on Oct. 14.


STATE NEWS

State Energy Strategy Draft Due Oct. 30
Washington is developing a 2021 State Energy Strategy to support the state’s goals related to climate. The call for an updated state energy strategy was part of 2019 legislation establishing a new clean electricity standard for Washington, the Clean Energy Transformation Act (SB 5116). The State Energy Strategy is a roadmap for the state to consider when evaluating how we meet our decarbonization goals across buildings, transportation, industry, and electricity sectors. The process is led by the Department of Commerce, advised by an external Advisory Group, and shaped by technical analysis and support from the Clean Energy Transition Institute. More info here. The draft strategy documents will be released on Oct. 30, followed by public hearings. AIA offered comments during the strategy development process and will offer additional comments on the draft once it is released. If you’d like to be part of AIA’s review, please contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

City of Seattle Budget Process
Seattle kicked off its 2021 budget process in late September with the release of Mayor Durkan’s proposed budget and department presentations to councilmembers. Council hearings and public meetings will be held through the deadline for passing the budget, Nov. 23. The city’s budget calendar is here. You can participate by signing up to provide public comment at a meeting, emailing your councilmembers, or checking their websites for district-specific open meetings and other opportunities for feedback. You can also sign up to receive email newsletters from any of the councilmembers on their websites – these newsletters often have the latest information on district events and councilmember positions.

Seattle City Council Passes Climate Notes Resolution
On Sept. 21, the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a resolution by Councilmember Alex Pedersen that would require Council staff to evaluate the carbon impacts of city projects starting in January 2021. This information will be part of the briefing information distributed to councilmembers on each legislative proposal. Specifically, the resolution asks staff to include information on how each project would impact carbon emissions and whether the project would help or hinder the city’s resiliency to climate change.

AIA Seattle Climate Advocacy Week: Seattle Energy Code
The City of Seattle is updating its commercial energy code as part of its 2018 Construction Code update. You may review the detailed code revisions on the city’s website and read a summary of the changes from AIA Seattle’s Shift Zero coalition partner, the Northwest Energy Coalition, here. These code changes will be considered by the City Council in early December, after the city’s budget process is complete. Once approved, the new codes will go into effect on Feb. 1, along with the statewide code updates.

AIA Seattle strongly supports these code revisions because we believe these changes will help Seattle dramatically reduce fossil fuels in buildings over the next decade. We’re kicking off plans for AIA Seattle’s Climate Advocacy Week, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, when we’ll be asking our members to help us make sure our city councilmembers know how important buildings are to combating climate change and how the energy code changes will put us on a path to reaching the city’s climate goals. Moreover, we’ll be engaging in the same outreach to our King County Councilmembers, who will also be considering the Seattle Energy Code updates during this timeframe. Join us in a week of advocacy – we’ll have learning events, a climate happy hour, and an opportunity for you to join your fellow architects in online meetings with your local representatives. To learn more or to RSVP, click here. Your advocacy will make a big difference!

Seattle Stormwater Code Update
The Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections continues to work on its 2021 Stormwater Code and Manual update, which is scheduled to be effective in July 2021. Revised documents will be posted in November and in January-February 2021. More info is available here.

King County Increases Sales Tax to Provide More Homeless Housing
The King County Council voted on Oct 13 to approve a 0.1 percent sales tax increase to provide additional homeless housing. The tax is expected to raise $70 million a year and will take effect Jan. 1. The County is taking advantage of an opportunity granted by the state legislature earlier this year, which gave local governments the option to adopt a one-tenth of one percent sales tax increase if the money raised is allocated to address affordable housing. King County is opting to use the additional revenue to purchase hotels, motels, or nursing homes that can then be converted into immediate housing for the homeless. The total amount raised will be less than originally planned, however, as the city councils of eight of the county’s 38 cities voted to reserve the right to increase the sales tax in their cities but to use the money for their own projects. Those cities include Bellevue, Issaquah, North Bend, Maple Valley, Snoqualmie, Renton, Covington, and Kent. AIA supported King County’s action as part of a board coalition led by the Housing Development Consortium.


OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Washington Council’s Advocacy in Action
AIA Washington Council is looking for the next generation of architect advocates! AIA|WA is offering a free, 3-part webinar series on how architects can effectively advocate for the issues that are important to you – whatever you care most about, there’s a way to make a difference. Advocacy in Action will focus on demystifying advocacy, illustrating how to get involved and make an impact on issues such as climate change and housing. The series is designed for emerging professionals and students, but everyone is welcome.  Read more about this series and register here.  You will receive one learning unit for each seminar, and the series is open to all architects and designers in Washington (you do not have to be an AIA member).

Home Electrification Google Group
Interested in residential electrification personally or professionally? Join this Western Washington Home Electrification Google Group to share tips with architects and others who are working through the ins and outs of home electrification.

Fire Code Technical Advisory Group
The State Building Code Council (SBCC) is seeking an architect to serve on the Council’s International Fire Code Technical Advisory Group (TAG) the for the 2021 code adoption cycle (Oct. 2020 – June 2021). Technical Advisory Groups review new editions of the model codes to identify significant changes and review existing and proposed state amendments. Applications to serve on a TAG consist of a letter of interest and a resume, plus an endorsement from AIA Washington Council. For more information, contact Kirsten. You may also contact the SBCC at sbcc@des.wa.gov.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom. The October meeting will be held on Oct. 20, however. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

AIA Seattle Community Engagement Forum – Oct. 19-21
Establishing Meaningful Relationships with Communities You Serve will help you build the knowledge, resources, and skill-sets to form more authentic relationships and coalitions with community and create not only beautiful, functional and successful buildings and spaces, but also transform our profession from one that works for community to one that works with. More info.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Uncategorized

Design After Quarantine Series

Join us for an extended look at how design is impacted by the COVID pandemic.

BACK TO THE OFFICE: RETURN STRATEGIES
June 2020

These town halls, one for medium-large firms and one for small firms, explored how firms and individuals were strategizing about our profession’s move to working from home and a return the office while navigating the COVID pandemic.
Event page (event videos are available here)

FUTURE OF DESIGN
November – December 2020

Our Future of Design panels will explore how the COVID experience is changing the way we think about and design buildings and spaces. As we try to understand the role of architecture post-pandemic, we’ll look at how design is already changing to accommodate market demands and societal shifts as we adjust to living, working, and staying healthy in our built environment. Our panelists will discuss what they are hearing from clients as well as new ideas, innovations, and best-practices that designers can use to make our built environment healthier, more equitable, and resilient.

Residential
The Future of Residential Design | November 5, 3:00-4:00 pm
We’ll explore the ways in which the look and function of single- and multi-family residences are being altered by the pandemic today and what changes are on the horizon for tomorrow.

Healthcare
The Architecture for Health Committee presents: Looking Back to Look Forward | Nov. 4-6
With a global pandemic, racial injustice, and climate change at the constant forefront of our minds, by now it is clear that we are all living through a major turning point in history. Join us in conversation on what we have learned in the past year and the opportunities to move health care forward together.

The Future of the Workplace/Office Design | tbd

Schools + Educational Design After the Pandemic | tbd

 

FUTURE OF CITIES
2021
Posted in Uncategorized

2020 Committee & Volunteer Awards

image collage of the AIA Seattle Volunteer Award winners. Names in description

This year we recognize Matt Hutchins AIA; the Seattle Design Festival Core Team; and the Committee on the Environment, co-chairs: Shannon Bunsen and Gaurav Mehta.

AIA Seattle Volunteer Award: Matt Hutchins AIA

Matt Hutchins is a founder and principal of CAST architecture. In that role, Matt has spent more than twenty years working to increase the vitality of the city and the environment. With AIA Seattle, he has been a steadfast advocate and public educator on topics such as abundant urban housing options, backyard cottages, Residential Small Lot Zoning, sustainable building and zoning reform are a large component of his mission. He co-chairs AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and serves on the Public Policy Board, and served in the past on the Housing Design Forum Committee, and co-facilitated the chapter’s ADU tour and City Leader Breakfast.

Design in Public Volunteer Award: Seattle Design Festival Core Team

The Seattle Design Festival is produced by a passionate group of volunteers who shape the Festival each year, and who help hold us accountable to our goals, mission, and vision. Comprised of both design professionals and enthusiasts this group works together for eight months to develop the call for proposals, identify partners, review submissions, and on occasion completely pivot the Festival to virtual platforms. Pictured here are our core 2020 Committee members (clockwise, starting upper left) Elana Darnell, Julia Edwards, Adam Ury, Trevor Dykstra, Lisa Sato, Matt McWilliams, Yasir Altemeemi, George Zatloka, and Uris Giron (not pictured Michelle Gagnon-Creeley).

Committee Award: Committee on the Environment | Co-chairs: Gaurav Mehta and Shannon Bunsen

Formed as an offshoot of the national AIA Committee on the Environment, Seattle’s COTE chapter has worked for well over a decade to promote sustainability, and enhance the environmental performance of the built environment. In the past year, our COTE chapter has collaborated with numerous groups and organizations including Urban Design Forum and Seattle University, and is in-progress on programs with Design & Wellbeing and ASHRAE. Following the arrival of COVID-19, the group has maintained and even grown its network, moving seamlessly into online formats for events like their annual Earth Day Slam, and seminars on equity and renewables, and integrated design. Their leadership has stood at the forefront of AIA Seattle’s committee adaptations during an uncertain time, showing how to effectively transition to the new normal.

Thank you all for your incredible work and high level of leadership and involvement with AIA Seattle!

Join us October 2, 2020 to celebrate the Award Winners at the 2020 President’s Dinner.

Posted in Committee on the Environment, Design In Public, For the Profession, For the Public, Housing, Public Policy Board

AIA Seattle Announces 2020 Honorees

AIA Seattle - 2020 President's Dinner

Honorees are nominated by their peers and selected by the Fellows & Honors committee each spring. AIA Seattle is delighted to recognize these recipients for their exceptional contributions to the profession and our community.

Please join us in congratulating the 2020 Honorees! This year, amidst our many local and global crises, we are committed to celebrating the best of our profession. Our virtual awards program will take place on Friday, October 2, and we look forward to honoring this year’s awardees in-person at the earliest opportunity to do so safely. Click below for details on the program.

Click here to view the recorded awards ceremony and acceptance speeches.

 

2020 HONOREES

Gold Medal

Walter Schacht FAIA

Bald white man in a beige sweater with light blue collar peeking out, smiling and standing in front of an out-of-focus outdoor backgroundWalter Schacht, FAIA has practiced architecture for over thirty years with a central focus on the public realm. He thinks strategically about the relationships between people, place and process. His clearly planned, carefully detailed civic buildings reflect a search for meaning inspired by their community, context and culture. Walter’s partnership with architect Cima Malek-Aslani is the foundation of his practice.

Walter works with his colleagues and clients to promote public policies that advance the profession and the community. He served as AIA Seattle President, on AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board, AIA Washington Council and chaired Washington State’s Capital Projects Advisory Board. In 2013, Walter was inducted into the AIA College of Fellows for his distinguished body of work and activism. In 2015, he received AIA Seattle’s Community Service Award and AIA Washington Council’s Jennie Sue Brown Award for service to the profession.

Young Architect Award

Sarah Haase AIA

Light-skinned women with wavy, light-brown hair smiling and standing in front of a wrought-iron fence

Sarah is an architect interested in designing and advocating for a socially and culturally conscious built environment. A generalist and a strategist, Sarah believes the best designs come from deeply engaging with the users and context of the projects’ communities and environment. Her current work with Schemata Workshop falls under the umbrella of community-based design, with clients such as non-profit affordable housing developers, social service providers, and public transit agencies.

Originally from Germany, she moved to Seattle after graduating with her B. Arch and Minor in Leadership and Social Change from Virginia Tech. Sarah has been advocating for a broader understanding and application of the positive impact of design through organizing the annual Seattle Design Festival, serving on the board of Design in Public, speaking on panels about equitable housing, assisting with Youth Workshops with the Seattle Architecture Foundation, and participating in the Housing Development Consortium’s Affordable Housing Leadership Cohort.

Garrett Reynolds AIA

White man with spiky brown hair, smiling in a white, collared shirt in front of an out-of-focus office backgroundGarrett Reynolds, AIA LEED AP BD+C is an architect at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. His work strives for elegant, clear design solutions that thoughtfully respond to the unique circumstances of place. He takes pride in being a generalist architect with strong interests in building tectonics, conceptual design, and research – all with a focus on craft and detail. His interest in housing of all scales and types has resulted in a highly varied portfolio of work at BCJ and Mithun including a large mixed-use project in Portland’s Pearl District, a significant private residence in Big Sur, and a family retreat in Iowa.

Garrett is highly involved in the Seattle design community. He co-chaired the 2016 Urban Housing Forum and chaired the 2020 Virtual Housing Design Week. He continually strives to incite conversation around Seattle’s livability and positive urban growth strategies. He led BCJ’s submission to the City of Seattle’s DADU Competition and has written numerous articles on the topics of housing, transportation, and urban livability that have been published in ARCADE, Seattle Magazine, and the Daily Journal of Commerce. Garrett received the AIA Seattle Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship in 2015 and the Donald and Joanna Sunshine Architecture Fellow Alumni Award in 2020.

Honorary AIA Seattle Membership

Casey Schuchart

Man in suit with red tie, in front of glass backgroundCasey is a fifth-generation construction professional whose career has been honed through time spent working in the field, estimating, project engineering, project management, and division management roles. He was instrumental in the delivery of the Bullitt Center; a six-story office building deemed the ‘greenest’ commercial building in the world. As the President of Schuchart, Casey leads the team through the execution of business initiatives and strategies. Casey earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of San Diego and an MBA from Seattle University. Casey currently serves as the immediate Past President for the Seattle Architecture Foundation, while also serving as a board member for the Seattle Aquarium and the Lakeside Alumni Board.

 

 

Ellen Sollod

Gray-haired woman in black jacket in front of tri-color background

Ellen Sollod is a civic artist and activist who has worked to integrate art into the public realm for over four decades–as an artist, policy maker, art planner and administrator.

Her public art can be found throughout the Pacific Northwest in light rail stations, streetscapes, bridges, parks, plazas, educational facilities and even a waste water treatment plant. Her permanent works are deeply rooted in the site, often referencing its hidden history.

As an art planner, Ellen has laid the groundwork for many other artists to bring their artistic vision to life.

As a policy maker, she served on the Seattle Design Commission, Seattle Public Art Advisory Committee and as the Executive Director of the Seattle Arts Commission.

Ellen was a NAIUSI fellow and has received awards from Allied Arts and 4 Culture.

She has maintained throughout her practice a deep and abiding commitment to the public realm and to collaboration with design teams and the community.

Marshall Foster

Brown-haired man in a jacket, over open-collar blue shirt, in front of outdoor backgroundMarshall Foster is the Director of Seattle’s Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects (OWCP). OWCP leads the “Waterfront Seattle” program, which is creating 20 acres of new parks and public spaces on Seattle’s Central Waterfront, and is supporting the Pike Place Market and Seattle Aquarium in completing major expansions. The Office is also leading efforts around the redevelopment of Key Arena and Memorial Stadium at Seattle Center.

Prior to that Marshall served as the Seattle’s Planning Director from 2009 through 2014, where he oversaw plans for South Lake Union’s expansion, along with community plans for the Rainier Valley, Capitol Hill, the University District and Northgate. He holds a Master’s Degree in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley, and lives with his wife and two children in West Seattle.

Greg Briggs

Light brown hair man in suit-and-tie in front of mute backgroundGreg Briggs grew up the son of a civil engineer and was exposed to engineering as an early teen working at his dad’s firm. Fascinated with the design of buildings led him to get his master’s degree in Structures from North Carolina State after receiving his BSCE from Oklahoma State. As a structural engineering consultant for over 30 years primarily in Seattle, he has had the opportunity to work on many significant projects and with several great architects in Seattle and across the globe. His project types have varied from museums, performing arts, institutional and historic renovations as well as many others. He recently served as the principal engineer-of-record on the landmark Climate Pledge Arena renovation project.

The Islandwood project on Bainbridge Island was pivotal early in his career in understanding sustainable design and the role of the structural engineer. This inspired him to become a founding member of the Structural Engineering Institute’s Sustainability Committee and authoring articles and co-authoring a book, as well as lecturing on the topic.

Community Service Award

Richard Browning AIA

Smiling grey-haired man in green/brown sweater, in front of black background

Rick Browning is a fourth generation Floridian who ran far away from home and then spent his career as an architect and activist trying to protect the Pacific NW from the environmental degradation he had witnessed in the Sunshine State.

With his own Portland based firm he worked on projects such as the retrofit of all seven non-freeway Willamette River bridges for better bike, pedestrian and disabled user access. He chaired the committee which oversaw Portland’s first Bicycle Masterplan and served on myriad other committees and task forces.

In Seattle, Rick chaired the Chapter’s Urban Design Forum and more recently the Chapter’s Transportation Task Force. He also served on both the Chapter’s governing Board and Public Policy Board. Pro bono work has included spearheading a task force to create an Urban Design Element for the City’s Comp Plan and many individual battles to equitably repurpose public right-of-way.

Allied Organization Award

Housing Development Consortium

Multiracial, mixed-gender group of people posed in front of a blue sheet, smilingFounded in 1988 by 10 Seattle-area nonprofit housing providers, HDC’s membership has grown over the last 32 years to encompass all the major affordable housing developers, financial institutions, architects, general contractors, attorneys, accountants, service providers, public housing authorities, and government agencies, working in the affordable housing space in King County, Washington. United around our shared vision – “That all people live with dignity in safe, healthy, and affordable homes within communities of opportunity” – our membership-based network collaborates effectively to provide a wide range of stable and affordable housing opportunities for our region’s low income and most vulnerable residents. Each night, more than 125,000 individuals go home to more than 45,000 affordable homes created or preserved by HDC members. By bringing together organizations, government agencies, and businesses around shared values, we are better positioned to support the sector’s ability to make a positive, community-wide impact. Guided by our members and volunteer Board of Directors, we weave a powerful network of strategic alliances across sectors and industries to respond to diverse community needs and provide capacity-building, networking, and advocacy opportunities all geared toward creating a sector that is more equitable, productive, efficient, and effective as good stewards of public resources.

Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship

Queena Yi Assoc. AIA

smiling, sandy-haired woman in black sweatervest, in front of green treesQueena Yi, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is an architectural designer with over six years of experience and is anticipating licensure this year. Her previous work experience at Katerra and Perkins + Will, where she managed senior housing projects and a WeWork | WeLive project, provided the foundation for this Travel Scholarship proposal. Previous to pursuing a career in architecture, Queena worked for over a decade at various startup tech companies in San Francisco and Seattle. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the University of California at San Diego and an M.Arch from the University of Washington. During her studies at the UW, Queena received a Scan Design Fellowship to study at the Royal Danish Academy in Copenhagen for one year. Her time in Copenhagen provided the groundwork for her thesis project, Memento Mori | A Non-Sectarian Memorial Site in Seattle, which was later selected for the AIA 2015 Emerging Professionals Exhibit. Queena has been active in the design community by participating in the UW PAC, Design in Public, and Seattle Architecture Foundation at various capacities.

View the 2020 Travel Scholarship announcement for more information about Queena’s proposal.

REGIONAL & NATIONAL HONORS

2019 Regional Emerging Firm Award

Best Practice

Black-and-white photo; man on left in a zipfront hooded sweatshirt and goatee; woman on left with buzzcut, and striped, shortsleeve shirtBest Practice is a design-intensive firm located in Seattle, WA. Despite our size (we are 8) and relatively young age as an office (founded in 2011), we relish tackling a diverse range of work, from small boutiques or residences to large scale offices & cultural projects. We believe that meaningful design is a balance between inspiration and the real-life needs of each project. From there, intuitive and experiential design often emerges. Our strength lies in our ability to creatively collaborate – with each other, with our fabricators, with our clients, all to provide innovative solutions that explore the precarious balance between function, content and beauty.

We are very fortunate to have a close working relationship with many local designers, artists, scientists and engineers… seeking like-minded people to partner with on project components is one of the best parts of working in a city like Seattle. These talented individuals lend their craft and insight to our projects, helping us realize a vision that provides a measure of unique, locally crafted feeling in all of our works. While we like to dream big with our work, we are no strangers to the realities of budget & time, and affirm that organization, planning and proper procedures help produce successful projects.

2019 Regional Firm Awards

Weinstein A+U

Group photo outdoors in clear-blue sky; multi-gender group with hands raised in celebration on a rooftopWeinstein A+U is a 25-person generalist architectural firm located in Seattle Washington. Founded by Ed Weinstein in 1977, the firm provides comprehensive design services on a broad array of building types including education, social service, institutional, public sector, public safety, commercial, mixed-use, multi-family residential, single family residential, adaptive re-use, and urban design. By integrating an urban design perspective, the firm is especially effective in the design of complex urban projects.

Our work is rational, intelligible, and straightforward. We combine rigorous site and program analysis with a disciplined design process. We endeavor to design buildings that fit their circumstances, earn broad community support, are constructed efficiently and cost effectively, and serve as exemplars for design excellence.

We are especially proud that the recognition for design excellence that we have received for such diverse projects testifies to the significance of our fundamental mission: to design thoughtful buildings that reflect the values of the communities we serve.

2020 Young Architect Award

JoAnn Hindmarsh Wilcox AIA

2020 Honorary AIA

Lisa Richmond Hon. AIA

2020 Associates Award

Stacey Crumbaker Assoc. AIA

View the 2020 National Awards announcement for more information.

2020 AIA College of Fellows

Chris Eseman FAIA
Dave Goldberg FAIA
Christopher Meek FAIA IES

View the 2020 Fellows announcement for more information.


THANK YOU TO OUR 2020 PRESIDENT’S DINNER SPONSOR

President's Dinner Sponsors - Integral Group logo

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

Advocacy Update – August 2020

Its About Time - Housing

FEDERAL NEWS

AIA National Policy Platform
AIA National has released a federal policy platform in advance of this year’s presidential elections. General categories include:

  • A future economy
  • Climate action
  • Healthy and equitable communities

STATE NEWS

Clean Energy Transformation Act
The Washington Department of Commerce has released its second set of draft rules for the state’s Clean Energy Transformation Act (CETA) (SB 5116, 2019), which commits Washington to an electricity supply free of greenhouse gas emissions by 2045. Written comments from the public are due by Sept. 14. More info about CETA and the draft is available here. AIA Washington Council supported this legislation in 2019 but has not taken an active role in the rulemaking as it does not directly relate to AIA’s built environment-related climate priorities.

Clean Building Performance Standards
Washington’s Clean Buildings Act (HB 1257, 2019) requires the Department of Commerce to develop a state energy performance standard for commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet. After a year of stakeholder input, the proposed rules are expected to be published on Sept. 2. Additional input will be solicited as part of a public hearing process, with the final rules established by Nov. 1. AIA|WA will hold a webinar to explain the new rules in November. More info on the state’s Clean Buildings program here.


LOCAL NEWS

Bike Parking Changes in SDCI Omnibus Bill
The Seattle City Council’s Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee approved omnibus legislation related to SDCI that included changes to bike parking requirements for affordable housing. These changes reflect significant lobbying by Seattle’s bike lobby and affordable housing advocates. Subject to approval by full Council, the changes would:

  • Restore short-term bike parking requirements for affordable housing.
  • Limit the exemption from bike parking requirements for affordable housing to only projects serving 30 percent AMI and below (permanent supportive housing).
  • Remove the proposed bike parking exemption for 30-60 percent AMI affordable housing projects.
  • Allow the SDCI Director to waive bike parking requirements for 30-60 percent AMI affordable housing projects if:
    • The waiver would allow more affordable units to be produced.
    • Reasonable alternatives for bike storage are provided; authorizes SDCI and SDOT to promulgate a joint Director’s Rule to define reasonable alternatives.
  • Clarify that the SDCI Director can waive bike parking for non-profit senior housing or housing for persons with disabilities, regardless of whether it is in a congregate residence.
  • Limit the number of stair steps to access bicycle parking, whether interior or exterior, to five.

SDCI Rolls Out Virtual Design Review Board Meetings
SDCI has begun a gradual rollout of virtual Design Review Board meetings for Early Design Guidance meetings only and plans to reassess the process for all projects in September. More info is available here.

SDCI Virtual Inspections Survey
SDCI is seeking users of its virtual inspection process to complete a brief survey on their experience. SDCI is also seeking users to participate as stakeholders on its Virtual Inspections Project team. More info here.

2018 Code Updates
REMINDER: the 2018 Seattle Construction Code adoption is delayed until Feb. 1, 2021 to match the state’s adoption schedule. Seattle is holding public meetings to discuss the Seattle Energy Code amendments, providing local stakeholders with an opportunity to further improve the amended language. Contact Kirsten if you would like to attend any of the following sessions:

  • Thursday, August 27, 9:30 AM – 12:00: General, Envelope, Lighting & Electrical
  • Thursday, September 10, 9:30 AM – 12:00: C406 Efficiency Credits & C407 Modeling
  • Thursday, September 17, 9:30 AM – 12:00: Mechanical & water heating
  • Thursday, September 24, 9:30 AM – 12:00: As required for unresolved issues

Written comments may also be sent to Duane Jonlin FAIA.

Bellevue Reduces Parking Rules for Affordable Housing Near Transit
The Bellevue City Council approved of Ordinance 6513, imposing reduced parking standards for affordable housing developments near transit. AIA Seattle has supported removing or eliminating parking requirements in areas served by frequent transit to boost affordable and other housing in areas where residents are less likely to own cars.

Portland’s Residential Infill Project Passes
Portland passed comprehensive zoning reform on Aug. 11, allowing four homes to be built on any residential lot in the city and up to six homes per lot if at least half the homes are affordable to low-income residents. The reforms, called the Residential Infill Project, also remove parking mandates from 75 percent of the city’s residential land and increase allowable lot coverage for buildings over one unit – duplexes will be allowed to three-fifths the square footage of their lot and triplexes and fourplexes up to 0.7.

AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and its Public Policy Board are working to strengthen AIA’s efforts to promote flexibility in single family zones. The Housing Task Force has established a Slack channel to engage AIA members in conversation around re-imaging single family zoning. Contact Kirsten if you are interested in participating in the Housing Task Force or the Slack channel.


OPPORTUNITIES

ADU Showcase
AIA’s ADU Showcase, the online version of our cancelled ADU Tour, is accepting applications. Projects must be built, designed by an AIA member, and located in one of AIA Seattle’s operating counties. Firms/sole practitioners are limited to one entry each.  More info is available here.


EVENTS

Seattle Design Festival: It’s About Time We House Everyone
Join AIA’s Housing Task Force for an interactive exploration of missing middle housing (and more) in Seattle or your city. Check out our examples and add your own housing finds. Join the conversation as we strive for a more equitable, livable, and sustainable city for all. Website here. Check out all Seattle Design Festival events here.

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Tuesday at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force is meeting on an ad hoc basis via Zoom. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

Embodied Carbon 101 (Boston Society of Architects): Process + firm culture
Monday, August 24 from 12-1 pm PDT. With moderator Barbra Batshalom (Sustainable Performance Institute) and speakers Colin Booth (Placetailor), Steven Burke (Consigli), Amy Hattan (Thornton Tomasetti), Andrea Love (Payette), and Kimberly Seigel (Perkins+Will). Register here.  See the BSA’s embodied carbon series recorded events here.

GoGreen Virtual Conference Seattle
Sept. 8-9. More info.

Zero Carbon Conference: Scaling our Decarbonized Future – International Living Future Institute
Online Oct. 7-8  More info.

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

2020 Honor Awards

AIA Seattle Honor Awards for Washington Architecture 3x2

Click here for online gallery


(VIRTUAL) LIVE EVENT BROADCAST ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16

The Honor Awards for Washington Architecture is AIA Seattle’s annual marquee program, drawing hundreds of attendees to an event of unique rigor and breadth. This nationally-recognized program provides an important opportunity for the design community to share and celebrate its achievements, both among practitioners and with the community at-large. Award winners are revealed for the first time at the live event. This year is going to be a little bit different…

Find more information about this year’s (virtual) live event and how to RSVP here


JURY CONSIDERATIONS

Every year, jurors praise submissions that reveal the story behind the marketing images. What concepts and considerations drove the design? What were the challenges and opportunities along the way? How did the design team arrive at the solution? Submitters are encouraged to use the project narrative, captions, and inclusion of process work as opportunities to tell a design story.

In addition to the jury’s own criteria, the AIA Seattle community has identified four considerations for the submission review process:

  • Inspiration | How does the project manifest its stated intent–in form and function–revealing innovation in both thought and practice?
  • Problem-solving | How does the project creatively address challenges inherent in its site, budget, program, materials, collaboration, and context? What are the organizing principles informing design?
  • Environmental Sensitivity | How does the project exhibit serious intent to minimize negative environmental impact and enhance its relationship to the environment?
  • Social Impact | How does the project enhance the community in which it is situated? How does it help promote a vibrant and equitable community?

Additionally, the newly introduced Common App offers BUILT project submitters Ten Measures for Design Excellence to consider in telling the project story.


MEET THE JURY

Marsha Maytum, FAIA, LEED AP | Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects | San Francisco

Marsha Maytum FAIA, LEED AP, is a founding Principal at Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects (LMS) in San Francisco, winner of the 2017 National AIA Architecture Firm Award. Marsha has focused her career on community, cultural, and socially-responsible projects that promote sustainable design, including the creation of new buildings, rehabilitation of historic buildings, and adaptive reuse of existing structures. LMS has received over 175 regional, national and international design awards, including ten AIA COTE Top Ten projects. Marsha is a frequently invited juror and critic and has lectured nationally on the topics of sustainable design and adaptive reuse. She is a member of the National AIA Committee on the Environment Advisory Group, and served as its 2019 Chair. Marsha has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Oregon, the University of California, Berkeley and California College of the Arts.

Pascale Sablan, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP | S9ARCHITECTURE | Beyond the Built Environment, LLC | New York

With over 13 years of experience, Pascale Sablan has been on the team for a variety of mixed-use, commercial, cultural & residential projects in the U.S. and globally. Currently a Senior Associate at S9ARCHITECTURE in New York. Pascale is the 315th living African-American female registered architect in the U.S. She is an activist architect who works to advance architecture for the betterment of society, bring visibility and voice to the issues concerning women and diverse designers. She founded the Beyond the Built Environment organization positioned to uniquely address the inequitable disparities in architecture. She was awarded the 2018 Pratt Alumni Achievement Award, BD+C 40 Under 40; featured on the cover of the 09/2017 issue. Pascale is a 2018 AIA National Young Architects Award Recipient. Pascale has given lectures at Colleges and Universities nationally; cultural institutions such as the United Nations and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

 

Tatiana Bilbao | Tatiana Bilbao ESTUDIO | Mexico City

Tatiana Bilbao began her eponymous studio in 2004 with the aim of integrating social values, collaboration and sensitive design approaches to architectural work. Prior to founding her firm, Bilbao was an Advisor in the Ministry of Development and Housing of the Government of the Federal District of Mexico City, during this period she was part of the General Development Directorate of the Advisory Council for Urban Development in the City. The work of the office intersects with research allowing to design for diverse circumstances and in reconstruction or crisis scenarios. Bilbao holds a recurring teaching position at Yale University School of Architecture and has taught at Harvard University GSD, AA Association in London, Columbia University GSAPP, Rice University, University of Andrés Bello in Chile, and Peter Behrens School of Arts at HS Dusseldorf in Germany. Her work has been published in The New York Times, A + U, Domus, among others. Bilbao has been recognized with the Kunstpreis Berlin in 2012, was named in 2010 as an Emerging Voice by the Architecture League of New York, the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture Prize by the LOCUS Foundation in 2014, as well as the Impact Award 2017 Honorees for ArchitzierA + Awards, Tau Sigma Delta Gold Medal of 2020 and the Marcus Prize Award 2019.


YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Initiated in 2018, the Young Voices Selection (YVS) program aims to elevate and engage the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. Three young designers, nominated by firm leaders within AIA Seattle’s Firm Network and selected by the Honor Awards Committee, will be given the opportunity to review, deliberate, and select ONE Built project submission. This chosen project, the “Young Voices Selection,” will be recognized at the (virtual) live event and selected by this year’s Young Voices…


QUESTIONS?

Questions about the (Virtual) Live Event? Contact AIA Seattle Program & Event Coordinator, Zoe Guckenheimer.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Seattle Associate Director, Growth & Operations, Kristen Lound.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2020 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Posted in For the Profession, Honor Awards, Uncategorized

2020 Northwest Washington Design Awards

AIA Northwest Washington’s Steering Committee invites you to share your most dynamic, new work!

Join us as we celebrate the best architectural designs available from the AIA members in Whatcom, Skagit, Island, and San Juan Counties for the Northwest Washington Design Awards. These projects represent the finest standards in sustainability, innovation, building performance, and overall integration with client and surrounding community.

The awards presentation will follow the keynote speaker presentation: Who has the Power to be Inclusive? by Karen Braitmayer FAIA, founder of Studio Pacifica, and world-renowned accessibility expert and 2019 Whitney M Young, Jr. Award winner.

Join us for this timely and essential conversation about equity in design! It is a rare opportunity to hear Karen’s perspective on the issues we deal with every day.

Karen will be sharing with us her view on who has the power to be inclusive in Architecture. Is it the press, who can influence the vision of what is beautiful design? Is it the architecture schools, who help create that pipeline to the profession? Is it the profession as an agent of change or the architect themselves as the ultimate control of who is included in the design process, the team, and the creator of the design? Please join us as we explore these topics as well as Karen’s insight on accessibility within the profession.

Don’t miss it!


HOW TO SUBMIT

Call for Submissions opens: August 3, 2020
Submission Deadline: DEADLINE EXTENDED to September 8, 2020 at 5pm PDT

We invite you to submit to AIA Northwest Washington’s 2020 Design Awards. The intent of the Design Awards is to encourage excellence in architectural design and planning and to provide an avenue through which architects may gain recognition by their peers and the public. The ultimate goal is to raise the standards of architectural design excellence by both the architectural community and the public. We encourage you to join the conversation and tell your design story.

Submission deadline: September 8 at 5:00pm PDT. Finalize and complete payment before this deadline.

Please submit for the following categories:

  • Residential
  • Commercial
  • Unbuilt Project

Submission Fee: $150 for first project submitted, $100 for each additional project. (If submitting multiple projects, submit each project separately.)

Complete this application and upload the four (4) described documents to the below link.
**This application sheet details all submission requirements, and includes a form that you will submit to the below link.

SUBMISSIONS CLOSED

**At the discretion of the AIA NWW Design Awards Committee, late submissions may be accepted after 5:00pm PDT on September 3, and a late submission fee will be applied. No fees will be refunded for submissions that are disqualified or incomplete.


VIRTUAL EVENT ON OCTOBER 15

The Northwest Washington Design Awards is a marquee program, drawing over 100 attendees and featuring an awards presentation and keynote presentation. Full details on the virtual program can be found here. This program provides an essential occasion for the San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom county architecture community to celebrate its progress and growth within itself, and in conversation with the community at-large.

Click here to register


QUESTIONS?

Questions about Submitting? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Coordinator, Karen Bacon.

Questions about attending the Virtual Event? Contact AIA Seattle Member Engagement Manager, Connor Descheemaker.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Steering Committee chair, Dave Christensen.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2020 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Special thanks to our 2020 Design Awards sponsors - TFWB Engineers, GeoEngineers, Lund Opsahl, Dawson, FSi Consulting Engineers, The Greenbusch Group Inc., Ram Construction, HKP Architects, Judd & Black Appliance

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington

AIA Seattle Racial Justice Commitments

As AIA Seattle reflects on our pursuit of racial justice, we are committing to a process of transparency in what measurable actions we are taking. As a member-led organization, we are establishing this evolving list for the sake of mutual accountability — so you may see what we are doing, and tell us where we should be moving in the future.

  • In support of our stated equity, diversity, and inclusion goals, AIA Seattle now has a policy that women, non-binary people, or trans people and people of color will be represented in all continuing education programs (including all panel discussions when more than two speakers are invited). This month, the Board of Directors approved a policy that AIA Seattle will no longer host or promote CE programs where the speakers are all cis-men or all white.
  • In June 2020, AIA Seattle began a partnership with UW College of the Built EnvironmentPlanning in Color, and NOMA Northwest, to create action-oriented group conversations toward racial justice. The first session, held June 30, focused on establishing the current state of the architecture profession around racial equity, and included a series of lightning talks and group discussions to establish topics for future bimonthly group discussions in the year ahead. This group is actively working on continued events in this series. Stay tuned for those to get finalized and on the calendar this fall.
  • In June 2020, AIA Seattle compiled a collective list of Racial Justice Resources centered on direct action, education, engagement, and uplifting Black-led organizations and efforts with the through-line of design, architecture, and space. This list has continued to get updated and we invite our members and community to contribute to the collective dialogue, learning, and action.
  • In 2019, AIA Seattle piloted the Intercultural Leadership Program (ILP) to support equity, diversity, and inclusion goals, with the specific vision that the AEC professions will have a culture of attracting, retaining, and promoting women, non-binary people, and people of color. As a part of the intensive ILP trainings, our staff, the board, and a cohort of 30 members completed the Intercultural Development Index (IDI) assessment which illuminated our organizational tendency to minimize cultural differences. In dominant culture groups, minimization is primarily motivated by comfort, and the desire to focus on common ground. While well-intentioned, we know the impact of this can be harmful. ‘This is how we do things here’ rather than getting curious and excited about different ways of doing. Since the ILP program, AIA Seattle has been focused on cultural self-awareness, noticing and naming differences that make a difference, and understanding power dynamics. As we work to move toward the mindsets of acceptance and adaptation, we are growing our capacity to support a more just, equitable, diverse, and inclusive profession.
  • AIA Seattle facilitates the Diversity Roundtable committee, begun in 1986. This group hosts year-round a variety of racial justice-centric programming, including the Architects in Schools program and the annual Solstice event, focused on celebrating diversity in the profession.
  • Along with our Diversity Roundtable committee’s Architecture in School program, AIA Seattle annually sponsors the ACE Mentorship program at the $1,000 level, and Seattle Architecture Foundation at the $2,500 level to support their work with K-12 students learning all about the architecture, engineering, and construction professions and our collective goal of promoting a robust pipeline of diverse emerging architects.
  • AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board is critically reevaluating the policy issues AIA works on with an intentional racial justice and social justice lens. We are adding a race and social justice section to all of our policy position statements to ensure we are answering important questions related to who is telling the story, who makes the decisions, who benefits and how, and how will this build or shift power.
As we establish new protocols, goals, and activities, we will add them to the top of this list. Have suggestions? Please contact us at info@aiaseattle.org or raise a resolution for our Public Policy Board or Board of Directors to consider via one of our member committees.
Posted in Uncategorized

YAF + UDF Release Design Competition

The Young Architects Forum and Urban Design Forum recently released a design competition that is live now! This competition seeks ideas and proposals for incrementally reshaping our region’s automobile-centric areas towards walking and transit. The competition is open to anyone from anywhere and we hope to showcase the work in a publication and open a discussion about the future of Seattle’s development.

Click here to view a recording of this program’s Seattle Design Festival panel discussion.

Visit regionofshortdistances2020.wordpress.com/ for more information! Sign up for updates here!

Posted in Urban Design Forum, Young Architects Forum Tagged with: , , , ,

It’s About Time We House Everyone

Seattle needs more homes, of all shapes and sizes, for more of our neighbors. AIA Seattle is working to shape policies that rethink the city’s majority single-family zoned areas, which have often restricted access for communities of color, renters, low-income residents, and others these zones were created in the 1950s. We must provide more housing in these zones, connecting people to jobs and transit for a more equitable city. Luckily, there are great options for adding housing that fits into existing single family neighborhoods, providing homes for seniors, immigrants, 20-somethings, teachers, retail workers, those currently unhoused, and many more. These housing types, often called “missing middle,” include duplexes/triplexes/quads (‘plexes), courtyard apartments, cottage clusters.

Missing middle housing integrates a wider range of housing into existing neighborhoods as a modest strategy to meet growing urban housing needs. These types are compatible in scale with single-family homes and provide housing options along a spectrum of affordability to support walkable communities, locally-serving retail, and public transportation options.

Infill housing options currently exist in Seattle’s single-family zones and include accessory dwelling units (ADUs) and detached accessory dwelling units (DADUs). Other options require us to think beyond our current zoning policies, looking forward and backward in time for what else is possible. Seattle communities like Wallingford, the Central District, and Queen Anne historically developed as streetcar neighborhoods with diverse multifamily housing styles built along transit lines. Although the streetcar is now history, relics and modern improvisations on grandfathered-in missing middle housing can be found intermixed within and at the edges of single-family zones. For this program, we’ve added in townhouses/rowhouses and live/work spaces, which typically exist within low-rise (less than 4 story) multifamily residential and mixed-use zones, to help us see where residential density exists today and how it might change in the future.

 

Seattle Design Festival: Your Mission

Learn more about missing middle housing in Seattle – where we’ve been, where we are, and where we need to go – while making discoveries of your own and helping to build a group-sourced map of housing alternatives that provide more options for everyone in our cities. Join AIA’s Housing Task Force for an interactive exploration of missing middle (or just more dense) housing in Seattle or wherever you live. Check out our examples and add your own finds. Join the conversation as we strive for a more equitable, livable, and sustainable city for all. It’s about time we house everyone!

Things you can do:

  • Check out our reading list on missing middle housing..
  • Help construct our map of missing middle housing locations in your neighborhood or city – see below.
  • Get creative by imagining other “middle housing” possibilities for our neighborhoods. Photograph inspiring existing homes and designs or draw/paint/collage and label what you would like to see and tag @thirdplacedesigncoop on Instagram. Don’t forget to follow us!

Start Mapping!
Help us track down missing middle housing and other alternatives to detached single family homes in your neighborhood or other neighborhoods across your city. This challenge asks you to head outside (please wear a mask!) to capture photos of ADUs/DADUs*, ‘plexes, courtyard apartments, cottage clusters, townhouses/rowhouses and live/work spacesy. Take photos and send us the GPS coordinates (you can use a free GPS app such as GPS Camera 55) or the street address.

Here’s what to look for:

1. ADUs/DADUs*
2. ‘Plexes (duplexes, triplexes, quads, multi-plexes (5+)
3. Courtyard Apartments
4. Cottage Clusters or Bungalow Courts
5. Live-work units
6. Townhouses/Rowhouses
7. Create your own example!

Click on the map below to see examples. Email your photos to Kirsten at kirstens@aiaseattle.org. We’ll map your find here and give you credit. Prizes for the number of finds, the most difficult to find (cottage housing!), the most creative finds, and more will be awarded.

Find these in your community!  Send your pics and location info to: kirstens@aiaseattle.org

*Disclaimer
DADUs are by definition in someone’s backyard. Please do not trespass to capture your DADU photo. Many DADUs are visible from side angles or via an alley behind the house. When in doubt … find another DADU!

 

Posted in Design In Public, For the Public

Missing Middle Housing Reading List

The Housing Imperative

Nine Totally Necessary Evolutionary Changes for Seattle’s Residential Neighborhoods     The Urbanist     4.16.20

Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving     Washington Post     12.9.17

Bring Back Missing Middle Housing     AARP     2019

History of Seattle Zoning: This Is How You Slow-Walk into a Housing Shortage     Sightline     5.23.2018

Single Detached House Zoning

It’s Time to End Single-Family Zoning    Journal of the American Planning Association     12.6.2019

Lessons from Oregon’s Missing Middle Success      Sightline     11.4.19

How Minneapolis Ended Single-Family Zoning     The Century Foundation     10.24.2019

How Seattle Designed Neighborhood Plans to Inhibit Inclusivity     The Urbanist      10.17.19

Washington Legislature Opts for Incentives Over Mandates to Promote Housing Density in HB 1923     The Urbanist     5.14.19

Cities Start to Question an American Ideal: A House With a Yard on Every Lot     New York Times     6.18.19

Americans Need More Neighbors     New York Times     6.15.19

Is it Time to Ditch 1950’s Era Single-Family Zoning?     The Urbanist     12.4.18

Rapidly growing Seattle constrains new housing through widespread single-family zoning     Seattle Times     5.10.18

ADUs

Will Wall Street invade Seattle’s single-family neighborhoods? Not likely, experts say     Crosscut     7.18.20

ADUs In, McMansions Out, and Could Fourplexes Be Next?     The Urbanist     7.2.2019

Washington Just Advanced the Nation’s Best ADU Reform. Here’s Why It’ll Help.     Sightline     2/28/2019

Seattle Planning Commission Reports

Neighborhoods for All     Fall 2018

Evolving Seattle’s Growth Strategy     Winter 2020

Rectifying Seattle’s racist past requires a denser future, says report     Crosscut     12.12.2018

Architects as Advocates

Elevating the Role of Architects as Advocates for Equitable Housing     Next City     9.20.18

Resources

Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections: Zoning

Posted in Uncategorized

2020-21 Board of Directors

AIA Seattle’s Board Nominating Committee is pleased to present this slate of accomplished members to fill open seats on our Board of Directors beginning September 1, 2020. Voting opened July 13 and closes on August 3, 2020. All AIA and Associate AIA members are eligible to vote. You can vote yes or no for each nominee, and write-in votes are allowed. Voting by at least 10% of the membership is required to validate an election.

Your vote enters you to win a $50 gift certificate to the Intentionalist Marketplace!

Click here to vote

Myer Harrell AIA – President-Elect
Member since: 2006

Myer Harrell HeadshotMyer is a Principal at Weber Thompson, a mid-size multidisciplinary architecture and design firm in Seattle. As the firm’s Director of Sustainability, he manages the firm’s building performance initiatives including participation in the AIA 2030 Commitment. His current project focus is as the architectural project manager for urban commercial office projects, including three buildings pursuing Living Building Challenge Petal Certification. Myer was named the 2011 AIA Seattle Young Architect, and currently serves on the AIA Seattle board of directors and the AIA Continuing Education committee. He received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture with Philosophy citation at the University of Maryland in 2002, a Master in Architecture at the University of Washington in 2005, and completed a Commercial Real Estate Certificate at UW in 2016. He has co-instructed undergraduate and graduate architecture studios at UW and currently contributes as a guest lecturer and studio critic.

Statement of Interest: AIA is the voice of the architecture profession, and as one of the larger chapters, AIA Seattle regularly exhibits leadership within the Institute. Through top-notch programming we discuss and advocate for relevant issues of housing and homelessness, sustainable and low-carbon design, responsible transportation, resilience, and community engagement, among many other topics. I am constantly humbled by the knowledge, experience, and passion of member volunteers, and I admire the tireless work of staff. In recent years we have started good work in equity, diversity, and inclusion, but there is still much to be done. Pervasive systems of racial oppression continue to plaque our region and our nation. We won’t have a truly just profession until the identities of architectural graduates, licensed architects, firm leaders, etc. reflect the identities of the general population. And, we must affect change while we adapt to a world being changed in real time by the current global pandemic.

Carrie Anderson AIA – Director
Member since: 2020

Carrie Anderson AIACarrie Anderson has sixteen years of experience in custom residential architecture in the Puget Sound region, from small remodels and additions to multi-million-dollar new construction. She received her bachelor’s degree from University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee in 2002 and graduate degree from University of Washington in 2006. Since that time, she has been a passionate advocate for sustainability as an active member of the Northwest EcoBuilding Guild and International Living Future Institute. Carrie has presented at the Northwest Green Building Slam & Summit as well as the Northwest Green Home Tour. When not social distancing, Carrie is an avid sailor and softball player. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Seattle Times, Luxe Magazine and numerous other publications.

Statement of Interest: I am excited to serve on the AIA Seattle Board in order to get off the sidelines and take a proactive role in advocating for the issues I’m passionate about including, but not limited to climate change, social justice and equality. I’m also eager to represent my friends and colleagues in the industry by listening to their concerns and bringing them to the attention of the board.

Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA – Director
Member since: 2015

Whitney Lewis headshotWhitney Lewis is an East Coast native who’s called the West Coast home for the last 10 years and Washington state the last 5. After relocating to the Seattle area in 2015, she has been focused in the multi-family housing market specifically affordable housing. Currently, Whitney volunteers as one of the co-chair’s of AIA Seattle’s Diversity Roundtable where she is working to promote the committee locally and at a national level. Whitney is also finishing a three year term as a member of the Membership Steering Committee. When not volunteering, Whitney has been working at GGLO within their affordable housing group for the last year and a half. In and outside of work she seeks to make connections to encourage and promote diversity and equity in architecture and the built environment.

Statement of Interest: I have been a member of AIA Seattle’s Diversity Roundtable for the last five years, first working to better understand my role and how I can get involved and then how I can utilize and connect not only myself but committee members to one another so that together we can make real change. I’ve seen this as a co-chair of Diversity Roundtable and membership steering committee member. Within Diversity Roundtable, my mission has been to continue to promote the committee locally and showcase what we’re doing on a national scale. With the membership steering committee, I have had the opportunity to engage and connect member committees to help facilitate events that focus on inclusivity and equity for designers, architects and architects of color. I want to continue to advocate and elevate these issues as a member of the AIA Board to support and help AIA Seattle work towards leading the way in conversations of engagement towards a more equitable future.

Amarpreet Sethi – Affiliate Director

Amarpreet Sethi headshotAmarpreet Sethi is a Principal and Energy and Sustainability leader at west coast engineering firm, tk1sc. Her work experience in Architecture, Building Science and Engineering allow her to provide valuable contributions in the field of high performance building design holistically. Her knowledge of climate-responsive design, daylighting, HVAC systems enable her to assist in sustainability, especially in the early stages of design. Amarpreet has worked in multiple market sectors to assist in meeting goals of decarbonization and Net Zero. Driven by a passion to provide valuable contributions to clients’ sustainability goals through Building Optimization, Amarpreet has been doing building performance analytics for over 18 years. Amarpreet’s focus on sustainable design first began while completing her Architecture degree in 2001. She went on to achieve a Master of Science in 2003 and worked as part of Mechanical Engineering teams for 15 years prior to joining tk1sc in 2019.

Statement of Interest: I am thrilled to be requested to be part of the board of directors at AIA Seattle. I’ve presented at multiple educational series at AIA focusing on sustainability and building performance through the years and have found the experience very rewarding. I believe I bring a unique background to the board which will help in the conversation around the 2030 challenge, Energy and sustainability as well as health and wellness and systems. I am excited to have a voice through AIA and hence be able to have an impact to move our AEC industry towards a holistic future of energy efficiency through health and wellness and innovative design. I feel strongly that energy and health and wellness need to be discussed as a whole and not exclusively to drive towards passive solutions and this requires an architecture and engineering design partnership. A large portion of this also entails educating our userbase and owners to ask for what adds value beyond the business as usual and change the status quo.

Katie Oman – Affiliate Director
Member since: 2020

Katie Oman headshotKatie is an expert in capital project planning for arts & culture with twenty years’ experience in planning, decision making, and economic analysis for nonprofit and public sector clients across the country. Her approach combines deep technical expertise in the complexities of cultural projects with a sensitivity to the unique needs, values, and aspirations of cultural organizations and their communities. Katie spent a decade as a theatre planning consultant prior to shifting her focus to cultural economics and its intersection with design, working to help clients and design teams make informed decisions about investment in cultural infrastructure. Past projects and clients include Seattle Rep, Minnesota Historical Society, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, American Repertory Theatre, the City of Vancouver, and many others. Katie holds a B.A. in Architecture from Princeton University and an M. Phil. in Public History and Cultural Heritage from Trinity College Dublin.

Statement of Interest: Coming from a design background, but now working in a design-adjacent field, I am a big believer in the power of architecture (and architects!) to influence how communities and cultures develop and thrive. As the US continues to reckon with the legacy of its past and continuing structures of racial injustice and economic inequality, I believe architects are well-positioned to be at the forefront of re-imagining the *symbolism* of cultural buildings in our communities – not to mention their function. Creative approaches to urbanism, placemaking, and design will be at the forefront of our social, economic, and cultural recovery – I’m excited to become a part of this community and help continue these conversations.

Michael Stevens AIA – Director
Member since: 2008

Michael Stevens_headshotMichael is a principal at Everett-based Dykeman Architects. Born and raised in rural West Virginia, Michael relocated to the Northwest in 1999. He has over 20 years of experience in architecture and planning. He has been involved in a variety of projects including public, retail/mixed-use, education, residential, and civic projects. He is a thoughtful leader, an accomplished listener, and an excellent facilitator and client advocate. Michael earned a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania, with a planning focus, augmenting a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Kentucky. Additionally, Michael has served on the City of Marysville City Council since 2010, providing a unique perspective on the impacts of public policy on the built environment. Michael believes the best architecture is the product of a successful collaboration between the design team and the client. He has a broad knowledge of the profession and utilizes his many experiences to develop cohesive designs for his clients.

Statement of Interest: I began my career as an architect in Seattle. I look forward to fostering opportunities to promote a mutually influential relationship between Seattle and the north Puget Sound region architectural communities. I believe AIA Seattle has a relevant voice in public policy issues as they impact the built environment; continuing to exercise that voice in a proactive and consistent manner is paramount to our profession.

Posted in For the Profession, Home Page

Advocacy Update – June 2020

Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone Black Lives Matter Mural

BLACK LIVES MATTER

AIA Seattle joins powerful community voices raised to condemn the murder of George Floyd and the broader system of racism, violence, injustice, and inequity that it represents. In the coming weeks, you will hear more about our broader actions to incorporate anti-racism into our design work, our intercultural understanding, our community leadership, and our workplace practices. On the advocacy front, AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board has been discussing its work with heightened awareness of the need to make AIA’s policies and policy actions explicitly anti-racist. Initial discussions have centered around incorporating more member voices; inviting those doing the work at the intersection of urbanism and social justice to help us learn; and acting on our understanding that issues around community planning, Design Review, public spaces, transit, housing, sustainability and more must address, support, and offer wellness and safety to everyone in our communities. We welcome all members to join us in this process and invite your comments, questions, and ideas.

Read AIA Seattle’s Statement on Racial Justice and AIA National’s statement here. AIA Seattle’s Racial Justice Resources page can be found here.


STATE NEWS

2018 State Code Delay (Again)
The State Building Code Council (SBCC) considered a further delay to the 2018 state code update at its June 12 meeting. The update, originally scheduled to take effect on July 1, was previously delayed by an executive order from Gov. Inslee to Nov. 1, 2020. Builders and developers, concerned about the economic impacts of COVID, have argued that the implementation date should be delayed further, to Sept. 2021. Gov. Inslee denied a similar request from some state legislators in May, but the SBCC has the authority to enact a delay on its own. At its recent meeting, SBCC members voted against further delay, but because of an issue with the way the vote was conducted (one council member was not heard when he cast his vote), a revote will be conducted. A new vote is not yet scheduled, but, when it happens, there are expected to be enough votes to pass a further delay in the implementation of the new state codes to February 2021. AIA Washington Council sent a letter to SBCC members arguing against further delay. If the state code implementation date is delayed, Seattle will most likely also delay.


COVID-19 UPDATE

Construction Inspections
On Friday, June 5, King County received approval from the State Department of Health to move into a Phase 2 Restart for all private construction activities that are low-risk and adhere to strict COVID Job site Requirements. The City of Seattle also issued requirements for construction projects seeking inspections, available here.

Essentials for Reopening Architect Offices: June 19 Webinar
AIA Washington Council is hosting a webinar on the Essentials for Reopening Architecture Offices on Friday, June 19. The panel discussion will review the policies you will need to have in place, liability issues to address, and planning for keeping your staff, your clients, and you safe and healthy.

COVID Resources
View AIA Seattle’s full list of COVID resources and opportunities here. State and other resources related to reopening the workplace are here.


OPPORTUNITIES

ADU Showcase
AIA’s ADU Showcase, the online version of our canceled ADU Tour, is now open for applications. Projects must be built, designed by an AIA member, and located in one of AIA Seattle’s operating counties. Firms/sole practitioners are limited to one entry each. More info is available here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design remains closed, but many meetings have been moved to an online format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force is meeting on an ad hoc basis via Zoom. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

Architects in Action – July 9
Formerly known as the annual State Government Network Meeting, Architects is Action is AIA’s premier policy and advocacy event. It offers an opportunity to discuss pressing legislative issues, explore advocacy techniques and tools, and learn directly from your peers from across the country. This year’s event will be entirely virtual and is open to all members. More info here.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Racial Justice Resources Page

Black lives matter. We know there is hard work to be done. This compilation will continue to get updated and we invite you to contribute to our collective dialogue, learning, and action.

Please contact Zoe Guckenheimer, AIA Seattle’s Program & Event Coordinator, if you would like to add to this list.

Direct Action:

Consider taking action by donating, protesting, petitioning, calling and emailing representatives, providing mutual aid support, providing shelter, offering your skills, and/or getting involved with organizations. As information and needs are changing rapidly, consider doing research to inform your action.

Organizations Empowering Black Communities

Architecture & Design / Race:

Member & Firm-Specific Resources
Get Engaged
Design Organizations Empowering Black Communities
Readings

Anti-Racist Education:

Personal Resources:

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Diversity By Design Exhibition at King Street Station

Diversity Roundtable invites Architects and Architecture firms to celebrate the work of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) designers, designers of all genders, LGBTQI+ designers, designers with disabilities, immigrant designers, and more. Projects will be digitally exhibited at ARTS at King Street Station.

A stipend will be provided to firms with 15 or fewer employees for the time spent creating their submissions. Funds will be equally distributed among the participating firms, and the amount will depend on the number of participants.

For details on submission or questions contact Richard Murray at diversitybydesignseattle@gmail.com

Important Dates

July 10, 2020 Participant Confirmation Deadline

August 7, 2020 Digital files due to Richard Murray with Diversity Roundtable

Mid-September 2020 Exhibition opens at ARTS at King Street Station*
*pending local, state and federal guidelines related to COVID-19

Click here for a downloadable poster to share in your office.

Posted in Committees, Diversity Roundtable, Seattle International Architects Forum, Women in Design

AIA Seattle Statement on Racial Injustice

AIA Seattle Racial Injustice Statement

Dear AIA Seattle Members and Community At-Large,

AIA Seattle joins powerful community voices raised to condemn the murder of George Floyd and the broader system of racism, violence, injustice and inequity that it represents. We see the sustained anguish of Black people in our profession and in our broader community. Black lives matter. We know there is hard work to be done.

Social justice is inextricably linked to the built environment. It is evident in the racist history of redlining in Seattle and other practices that were put in place to undermine communities of color, and it remains evident today in the displacement experienced by communities of color. Leaders of National Organization of Minority Architects Northwest, Leon Holloway and Veronica Barrow, assert in their eloquent statement released today:

Architects are civic stewards who aim to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public through the built environment. As members of NOMA NW and of the AEC community, we believe it is our duty to design and build equitable spaces for all, without prejudice or bias, and to minimize the effects of racism within our profession. We must leverage our positions of privilege to help our most vulnerable citizens, neighbors, and colleagues – who too strive for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

As we experience daily images of pain and conflict, it is easy to feel powerless. But architects are not powerless. The work architects do matters, because it centers the experiences and needs of people. Cornel West says that justice is what love looks like in public. Architect Bryan C. Lee Jr. adds that design justice is what love looks like in public spaces.

Architects choose this profession out of a passion to make our communities better. Never has that urge been more important. We can and must act to make a difference — through our commitment to anti-racism, our design work, our intercultural understanding, our community leadership, and our workplace practices. We must begin by listening to the diverse communities we serve.

We accept the hard work ahead, and take it on with humility. Please help us. Add to our learning and our dialogue with your thoughts and ideas. Speak up where you believe we should be better. Let us join together in this somber moment, as designers and as human beings, to use our time and skills and voices in service to a better world.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Meredith Everist
President, AIA Seattle Board of Directors

Posted in Uncategorized

Reopening the Workplace Resources

As this public health crisis continues to evolve, we are committed to providing as many up to date resources as possible. Since many counties are being – or have been – approved for Governor Jay Inslee’s “Phase 2,” there is a growing need for guidance regarding how to prepare your workplace for re-opening. Below, we have compiled a list of resources that aim to support businesses and firms in their strategizing for this.

Here is the link to Governor Inslee’s “Safe Start” plan in its entirety. This plan outlines four phases of “reopening,” to be applied for on a county-by-county basis, depending on the four criteria which are also outlined in the document. Your county must be in Phase 2 before employees can start returning to the office on more than a temporary basis.

Reopening plans: 

Use these toolkits to develop your own reopening plan.

  • All employers must develop their own unique plans based on checklists.
  • Plans should be self-monitored and updated regularly based on evolving public health guidelines
  • Plans should be communicated to the workforce, posted at entrances for visitors, and emailed to employees and visitors.

Webinars/Virtual Events:

Toolkits:

Resources for Sourcing PPE:

Cloth Face Masks: Look for masks made with at least 2 layers of fabric. It should cover your nose and mouth without large gaps. The mask should have ear loops or ties so you can adjust it. For people who wear glasses, look for a mask with a bendable border at the top so you can mold the mask to fit the bridge of your nose and prevent your glasses from fogging. Professional masks should be reserved for health care workers on the front lines caring for patients. Here are some resources for cloth face coverings:

Hand Sanitizers and Disinfectants: Many of the local distilleries are producing sanitizer/disinfectant.  This is liquid, not like the gel kinds and is readily available.  These can be sprayed on hands and used to wipe down surfaces:

Other related resources:

 

Do you have resources to share?  Let us know! 

Posted in Uncategorized

2020 Northwest Washington Section Scholarship

AIA Northwest Washington Section is proud to offer its annual scholarship fund, designed to encourage and assist local residents pursuing a degree in architecture. The scholarship is open to students (inclusive of those with immediately family) from Whatcom, Skagit, Island, and San Juan counties currently enrolled in an accredited school of architecture, regardless of location. The scholarship is awarded to 2-3 applicants per year, for up to $5000 in funds raised by the annual AIA Northwest Washington/Associated General Contractors of Washington Scholarship Golf Tournament (details forthcoming).

Applications for the scholarship are due at 5pm 0n Monday, August 31 to the Section’s staff contact, Connor Descheemaker. Complete application and submission details here.

Learn more about the AIA Northwest Washington section and get engaged here.

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington

Advocacy Update – May 2020

As we continue to navigate work in these unprecedented times, AIA Seattle and AIA Washington Council are striving to make sure you have the resources you need to take advantage of federal, state, and local programs designed to help firms and individuals. We’re also working to inform you of policies released by state and local officials and to relay the state’s guidance on how architects can and cannot operate during this ongoing period. If you have questions, comments, or resources to share, please let us know.

COVID UPDATE

This is a review of policies that impact architects at the state and local level. You can view AIA Seattle’s full list of COVID resources and opportunities here.

Construction Activity: On May 15, Gov. Inslee’s office released a memo discussing the reopening of “professional services,” including architecture. In counties that have reached Phase 2 of the governor’s Safe Start approach only (all northwest Washington counties are currently in Phase 1), businesses can resume all operations immediately as long as they meet and maintain the state’s requirements, including providing materials, schedules, and equipment. You can find the guidance for reopening for Professional Services here: Guidance for Professional Services. For counties not yet in Phase 2, these are the guidelines you will need to be able to comply with to reopen once your county does reach Phase 2.

We previously reported on Gov. Inslee’s determination of “essential” businesses and his clarification on construction activity here. On April 24, the governor announced the results of his Construction Industry Roundtable charged with determining the safety precautions necessary to keep construction workers, trades people, and job sites safe. The plan, found here, walks through a detailed set of protocols for low risk construction projects to reopen. For Phase 1 counties, architects supporting low risk projects are currently allowed to return to work if they follow these safety guidelines. (Businesses that are able to continue working remotely are strongly encouraged to do so.)

Codes

Seattle: The Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) has delayed the 2018 code update scheduled to go into effect on July 1 to November 1, 2020. More info is available on SDCI’s code update website.

State: On April 2, Gov. Inslee issued an executive order delaying the implementation date of the 2018 code updates from July 1 to Nov. 1, 2020 in light of COVID considerations. Subsequently, Gov. Inslee was asked by some state legislators and interest groups to delay the state code further – to July 1, 2021 – but he recently issued a response denying that request.

Seattle Design Review
On April 28, the Seattle City Council passed emergency legislation to move affordable housing projects more quickly through the Design Review process under COVID restrictions a week after failing to pass the proposal by one vote. The legislation:

  • Shifts projects that are subject to full design review to administrative design review for six months (or earlier if the city can get design review online).
  • Exempts from design review certain affordable housing projects funded by the Office of Housing (these are currently required to go through administrative design review).
  • Bypasses Landmarks Preservation Board meetings by allowing certain decisions to be made by the city’s Historic Preservation Officer rather than the Board.

Councilmembers unanimously passed an amendment by Councilmember Tammy Morales that allows the International Special Review District (ISRD) in the Chinatown-International District to meet electronically (although approvals are postponed until robust public input can resume). Councilmembers rejected an amendment by Councilmember Andrew Lewis to block projects participating in the Living Building pilot program from using administrative design review.

Additional Design Review guidance from SDCI can be found here.

At the direction of the Housing Task Force, AIA Seattle sent a letter to councilmembers in support of the proposed Design Review changes for affordable housing while also issuing a call for the city to expand on these to address both the coming COVID economic crisis and the ongoing housing crises for all housing projects, including market rate housing.

More Information
If you missed the AIA Town Hall Q&A with SDCI covering many of these issues, you can view the recording here. Use the password: 8x+8M8uA

For more information about SDCI processes under COVID, check out SDCI’s blog, Building Connections.


ARCHITECTS IN ACTION

Designers Working to Provide Street Hand Washing Stations
A group of Seattle designers have been working with Tifffani McCoy of Seattle’s Real Change to create a “do-it-yourself” hand washing station made from off-the-shelf parts. The group includes UW Dept. of Architecture Associate Professors Elizabeth Golden AIA and Rick Mohler AIA as well as landscape architects Professor Jeff Hou of the UW Dept. of Landscape Architecture and Brice Maryman, principal at MIG. Their prototype hand washing station (see sketch here) is designed to connect to hose bibs located on private property. The design includes an integrated rain garden to manage greywater onsite.

The group’s first station was installed on May 19 at Roots Young Adult Center in the U-District (see installation photos here), and they are looking for help to identify more organizations willing to host stations – most likely community or religious organizations. If you have connections to an organization with a potential location, or if you have other siting ideas, please contact Elizabeth Golden. (Before approaching any organization, speak with Elizabeth first.) The group is also working on a detailed manual for people wanting to replicate the design.

The DIY Hand Washing station location criteria includes the following:

  • The location must have enough space for the planter and sink plus “safe” space around the user.
  • It needs access to an exterior hose bib.
  • The host must agree to care for the station (refill soap and clean).
  • The location should be in an area of need (close to downtown, Capitol Hill, near an encampment, etc.).

Off the Grid
This group of designers is also working with Anita Chopra, MD, from UW’s Division of Internal Medicine, and Mehr Grewal, a youth community activist and hand washing advocate, on an initiative to develop “off-the-grid” stations based on a design by Street Medicine Detroit, a team of medical students at Wayne State University. Street Medicine has developed and deployed this design in Detroit. While the Street Medicine team has had success making sure these stations stay operational on the streets, this type of station needs a group of dedicated people willing to maintain and refill it at least twice a week. If you have ideas about making such a station work in Seattle, please contact Elizabeth Golden.

The group has also been working with Architects Without Borders-Seattle and AIA Seattle’s Committee on Homelessness on this project.


LOCAL NEWS

Stay Healthy Streets
Seattle has mostly closed 23 miles of residential streets to vehicle traffic under its Stay Healthy Streets program. (Bellevue recently rolled out two Healthy Streets of its own.) While SDOT initially closed a limited number of streets to provide safe alternatives for people to recreate and travel during COVID, the program has proven so popular that the city has continued to add more streets and has indicated that up to 20 miles will remain permanently closed. Residents, delivery drivers, garbage and recycling workers, and emergency response vehicles can continue to use the streets, but no through traffic is allowed. Stay Healthy Streets are selected based on criteria that includes: an ability to amplify outdoor exercise opportunities, areas with limited open space options, areas with low car ownership, and areas able to connect people to essential services and food take out. SDOT has indicated that more streets could be closed to through traffic in the coming months depending on community demand.

AIA Seattle sent a letter endorsing the Stay Healthy Streets program to Mayor Durkan, SDOT Director Sam Zimbabwe, and City Council Sustainability & Transportation Committee Chair Alex Pedersen. AIA called for a much larger network of streets (Oakland’s Safe Streets program covers 74 miles) that allows for expanded and enhanced mobility and provides connections between neighborhoods. Doing so, AIA argued, will allow people in the weeks and months ahead to return to jobs, shop, and eat out while remaining socially distanced and staying out of their cars. AIA also asked the city to encourage and incentivize alternative forms of mobility by leveraging Stay Healthy Streets and expanding micromobility infrastructure to make the COVID-era increased use of micromobility devices more likely to be permanent.

The street-safety advocacy group Seattle Neighborhood Greenways released a proposal in May calling on the city to convert 130 miles of streets to Stay Healthy Streets and make other improvements to allow people to safely walk, roll, and use micromobility devices during COVID and beyond. AIA Seattle has endorsed this proposal. Individuals interested in signing on in support may do so here.


OPPORTUNITIES

ADU Showcase
AIA’s ADU Showcase, the online version of our cancelled ADU Tour, is now open for applications. Projects must be built, designed by an AIA member, and located in one of AIA Seattle’s operating counties. Firms/sole practitioners are limited to one entry each. More info is available here.

ICC Code Committees Seeking Applicants
The International Code Council (ICC) is accepting applications to serve on its 2021/2022 Code Committees during the next code cycle to develop the 2024 editions of the ICC International Codes. These committees will have a significant influence on the content of model codes. Applications for the ICC Code Committees are due June 1. Application forms are available here (use the links under “Codes Committees”).

The following resources offer more information on the code development process and what serving on a code development committee entails:

If you have questions, or if you do decide to apply to one or more ICC code committee, please notify AIA National at codes@aia.org with a copy of your application.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

AIA’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Tuesday at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

Finding Balance Across the Spectrum of Residential Design, AIA Seattle’s virtual design week, offers continuing education webinars, discussions, film screenings, art, and engagement focused on small scale residential design inspiration and practice innovation. June 8-12.

The Seattle Design Festival is accepting participant proposals through June 15. This year’s theme, About Time, seeks to ponder past, present, and future at a unique moment of transition for the city, the region and the world. While the traditional physical experiences have been canceled, the festival will now feature digital programming, virtual installations and exhibitions, as well as remote experiences. August 15-23.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

More Design Review Guidance

On April 27th, City Council passed emergency legislation making temporary six-month land use permitting process changes that:

  • Exempt affordable housing from design review
  • Keep projects normally subject to Design Review moving forward by allowing City staff to complete review processes through administrative design review
  • Allow for community participation during this public health emergency through the administrative design review process and by replacing in-person meetings with virtual meetings.

With this legislation, projects that have been unable to move forward due to the statewide prohibition of in-person meetings can once again be underway. The Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) will temporarily conduct the design review process administratively. Additionally, SDCI now has the authority to eliminate design review for City-funded affordable housing projects that can submit a building permit within the next six months. These projects can also request modifications from certain code standards as part of their building permit review.  SDCI staff will continue to develop an online meeting platform to allow for virtual Design Review Board meetings.

The Department of Neighborhoods (DON) is authorized to allow historic preservation staff to approve minor changes to City Landmarks, Special Review Districts, Landmark Districts, and Historical Districts. International Special Review District (IRSD) meetings will be postponed for at least 60 days.

The legislation also allows digital outreach to replace the in-person meeting requirements for the community outreach portion of the design review process.

This legislation is a temporary six-month solution to keep critical projects and processes moving and allows for community engagement during the COVID-19 public health crisis.

Additional Guidance

  • Projects that are subject to Full Design Review may elect into Administrative Design Review (ADR) within the six month period (ending Oct 25, 2020). SDCI has already reached out to all projects that have been impacted by a canceled meeting and the re-noticing process for these projects is well underway.
  • For projects subject to this emergency provision for ADR will stay in ADR until one of the following occurs – whichever is first*/**:
    • Boards resume business;
    • Virtual Design Review Board meetings are held; or
    • The six month period of the emergency legislation expires.

*Exception: If the EDG phase is completed within the six months, the project may stay in ADR for the full six months.

**Exception: Determination that a return to the Board would preclude the timelines set forth in 23.76.005 from occurring.

  • We will contact applicants directly to convert projects over to ADR as follows:
  • For first EDG phase, after application acceptance.
  • For EDG cycles beyond the first EDG and for all Recommendation cycles, when staff determine projects is ready to return to the Board.
  • As with all ADR projects, the assigned Planner is the point person for you to work with.
  • Affordable housing projects, which were already subject to ADR, may opt out of ADR if they intend to have a building permit submitted within the six month period, as determined by Office of Housing.

If you have questions about how this legislation may impact a specific development project, please contact:

Design Review
Lisa Rutzick, SDCI
Lisa.Rutzick@seattle.gov

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Call for Proposals – Member Access Events

AIA Seattle is seeking members of our community to offer one-hour, free skill-shares to our members for the purposes of networking and community-building. We’re interested in architectural and non-architectural skills!

Suggested skills include: meditation, sketching, watercolor, architectural tech tutorials, drafting, yoga—anything you have to share that your peers might enjoy as well.

Please submit a one-paragraph description of your proposed session to Member Engagement Manager, Connor Descheemaker.

Sessions will be offered 1-2 times per month depending on submission volume and member interest, and will be offered on AIA Seattle’s Zoom account to members for free, on a password-protected site. These are designed to be fun, low-pressure skill-building opportunities for small groups of architects to gather and share with one another.

Posted in Committees, For the Profession

Advocacy Update – April 2020

empty streets in seattle - AIA Seattle Advocacy update

As we all work to navigate these unprecedented times, AIA Seattle and AIA Washington Council are working to make sure you have the resources you need to take advantage of federal, state, and local programs designed to help firms and individuals. We’re also striving to keep you aware of policies released by state and local officials and to relay the state’s guidance on how architects can and cannot operate during this ongoing period of social isolation. If you have questions, comments, or resources to share, please let us know – or join us for our series of Town Halls for discussions and resources sharing among our member groups.

COVID-19 UPDATE

This is a review of COVID-related policies that impact architects at the state and local level, as well as resources for small businesses. You can view AIA Seattle’s full list of COVID resources and opportunities here.

Construction Activity & Essential Businesses
Read Gov. Inslee’s determination of an “essential” business and his clarification on construction activity here.

Codes
Seattle: The Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) delayed its 2018 code update scheduled to go into effect on July 1 to November 1, 2020. More info is available on SDCI’s code update website.

State: On April 2, Gov. Inslee issued an executive order delaying the implementation date of the 2018 code updates from July 1 to Nov. 1, 2020.

Seattle Design Review
To keep projects moving during COVID restrictions on public gatherings, the Seattle City Council is considering legislation that would:

  • Shift projects that are subject to full design review to administrative design review for six months (or earlier if the city can get design review online).
  • Exempt from design review certain affordable housing projects funded by the Office of Housing (these are currently required to go through administrative design review).
  • Bypass Landmarks Preservation Board meetings by allowing certain decisions to be made by the city’s Historic Preservation Officer rather than the Board.

This legislation will be considered by the full Council on April 20. At the direction of the Housing Task Force, AIA Seattle sent a letter to councilmembers in support of the proposed design review changes for affordable housing while also issuing a call for the city to expand on these to address both the coming COVID economic crisis and the ongoing housing crises for all housing projects, including market rate housing.

Small Business Assistance
Federal: The Small Business Association (SBA) received billions of dollars in funding via the CARES Act to support small businesses with special grants and loans, and more funds are likely to be appropriated once Congress is back in session. Find more information about coronavirus relief options available through the SBA here.

The CARES Act Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) provides small businesses with 500 employees or fewer up to $10 million in forgivable loans to pay their employees during the COVID-19 crisis. Loans are provided through financial institutions and lenders.

For more information about PPP loans:

Seattle’s Office of Economic Development is available to help small businesses navigate the SBA loan application process. To request this service, contact OED at oed@seattle.gov or (206) 684-8090.

Note: the state’s own small business loan program has stopped accepting applications at this time due to high volume. We’ll let you know if/when it reopens.

Other
Seattle’s Restaurant Takeout & Delivery Map for feeding yourself and supporting small businesses.


STATE NEWS

State Legislature
A reminder that the State Legislature concluded its 2020 legislative session on March 12. A special session is expected sometime this summer to address ongoing funding related to COVID-19, as the state has already spent two-thirds of the $200 million appropriated for the crisis by legislators in March (these funds came from the state’s rainy day fund). You may read AIA Washington Council’s session wrap-up here.


LOCAL NEWS

MHA Refinements
Although city timelines have been pushed back for many projects due to COVID, AIA expects the City Council to start work this year on making adjustments to the Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) legislation it passed in 2019. AIA’s Housing Task Force is working to identify changes architects would like to see made to the MHA program in advance of that work. Our understanding is the city has been collecting data on the performance vs. payment percentages of ongoing MHA projects, and we are working to find out when this data might be released and how it will be used by the city. AIA would like to see where development is happening under the current program so we can propose refinements. If you have thoughts on changes you would like to see to the MHA program, please add your comments to our Google Drive document here.

ADU Clean Up Legislation
Similarly, the city may start work this year on legislation to make adjustments to the ADU legislation passed last year, and AIA would like to develop a list of recommend changes to provide to the city. Examples identified by the Housing Task Force include allowing STFI for ADUs and removing covered porches from the square footage limits. Do you have changes you would like to see to the city’s ADU policies? Please add your comments to our Google Drive document here.


OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Seattle’s 2020 ADU Tour Canceled
AIA Seattle’s public ADU Tour, originally scheduled for June 6, has been canceled. We are working on a program that will allow members to showcase attached or detached built ADUs online; stay tuned here for more information.

AIA Seattle Presents: Action Now, Accelerating Pathways to Decarbonization
Tues. April 21, 8:30 AM – 5 PM
This series of webinars identifies the ways in which the significant scale and urgent timeframe of our climate crisis demand interventions that are broad and immediate. Four webinars throughout the day will help identify the data-driven interventions that will pay the highest dividends immediately; explore what will position us to stay on the path to 2030 targets and net-zero 2050; and pinpoint the regulatory and financial frameworks necessary to support this scale and urgency. Specific topics include: embodied carbon, building electrification, retrofits and more. Read more about the series here.

Cities Climate Action Webinar (Focus on Buildings)  Sat. May 2, 9:30-11 AM
People for Climate Action presents a look at how building policies around energy use and GHG emissions can impact climate change, including presentations by Architecture 2030, Bellevue City Council Member Janice Zahn, and Bellingham’s Climate Action Task Force. More info here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Member Town Halls
Join us for our series of Town Halls for discussions and resources sharing among our member groups. Each Town Hall will be facilitated by a combination of representatives from our Staff, Board, and Steering Committees and focused on finding ways for our community to co-create, share knowledge, and support one another in these unprecedented times. April 20 – May 15.

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet on the 2nd Thursday of the month (noon) via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force is maintaining dialogue through Slack. If you’d like to join the discussion, contact Kirsten.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Uncategorized

Gov. Inslee’s Shelter in Place Order

Gov. Inslee’s Stay Home Stay Healthy has been extended to May 4. The order outlines the requirements for all people to remain in their homes “except to conduct or participate in essential activities and/or employment in providing essential business services.” On March 25, Governor Inslee released a memo specifically addressing the construction industry, clarifying what parts of the industry are considered “essential” per the order. In the memo he states that, “in general, commercial and residential construction is not authorized under the Proclamation because construction is not considered to be an essential activity.”

The memo goes on to state that only construction related to essential activities, as described in the order, will be considered essential.  These include construction related to essential activities like health care, transportation, energy, defense and critical manufacturing; construction “to further a public purpose related to a public entity,” including publicly financed low-income housing; and emergency repairs.  Inslee further clarified in a press conference that construction related to grocery stores is considered essential.  There is no clarification regarding schools; our interpretation is that construction work on schools is not considered essential, although we are aware of some districts and universities that are moving ahead with construction activity.

Although the state guidance does not specifically reference architecture work, AIA’s interpretation is that such work in support of construction activity is allowed as long as the construction activity is on the state’s essential list.  If your work is considered essential, you do not need to carry a license or paperwork proving that it is.

According to the governor’s order, non-essential business operations must be conducted from home except for “minimum basic operations to a) maintain the value of your inventory, b) preserve the condition of your premises and equipment, c) ensure security, d) process payroll and employee benefits, e) facilitate employees of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences, and f) conduct related functions.”  AIA interprets this to mean that employees can go to the office for limited activities provided that all physical distancing and health and safety measures are adhered to while there.

Posted in Uncategorized

Seattle Project Related Resources during Covid-19

 

SDCI Q&A
On May 20, AIA Seattle held an online Q&A with SDCI about their project-related processes during COVID. You can watch that video here. Use password 8x+8M8uA

Codes 

SDCI Delays 2018 Construction Code Implementation to November
On March 19, the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) issued the following announcement related to the 2018 code update scheduled to go into event July 1, 2020: 

SDCI is in the process of updating Seattle’s construction codes to the 2018 versions of the building, residential, existing buildings, mechanical, energy, fuel gas, and plumbing codes.  We have been aiming for an effective date of July 1, 2020, to align with the effective date of the Washington State building codes.  However, due to many factors, including the impacts of the COVID-19, the effective date of Seattle’s codes will be delayed until November 1, 2020.  If the 2018 Washington State construction codes effective date is delayed past November 1, we will align the effective date of our codes with the State. 

Please read the latest message from SDCI here for updates, and visit the code update website for continued information and to review proposed code change documents. If you have questions, please contact Micah Chappell, Technical Code Development Manager, at micah.chappell@seattle.gov. 

State Code Delay
On April 2, Gov. Inslee issued an executive order delaying the implementation date of the 2018 code updates from July 1 to Nov. 1, 2020. Subsequently, Inslee was asked by some state legislators and interest groups to delay the state code further – to July 1, 2021 – but he recently issued a response denying that request.

Permitting 

SDCI Closes Public-Facing Resources
SDCI has closed its Applicant Services Center, Public Resource Center, and the 19th floor reception area. Alternative methods of reaching SDCI are available online. Click here for more info.

Inspection Services
SDCI has reduced its inspection services to only those that support construction activity that is deemed essential per Gov. Inslee’s Stay Home, Stay Healthy order.

Design Review
On April 28, the Seattle City Council passed emergency legislation to move affordable housing projects more quickly through the Design Review process under COVID restrictions a week after failing to pass the proposal by one vote. The legislation:

  • Shifts projects that are subject to full design review to administrative design review for six months (or earlier if the city can get design review online).
  • Exempts from design review certain affordable housing projects funded by the Office of Housing (these are currently required to go through administrative design review).
  • Bypasses Landmarks Preservation Board meetings by allowing certain decisions to be made by the city’s Historic Preservation Officer rather than the Board.

Additional Design Review guidance from SDCI can be found here.  Questions regarding Design Review may be sent to Lisa Rutzick at SDCI, Lisa.Rutzick@seattle.gov.

More SDCI Information
On May 20, AIA held a Town Hall Q&A with SDCI staff covering many of these issues. You may view the recording here. Use the password: 8x+8M8uA

For more information about SDCI processes under COVID, check out SDCI’s blog, Building Connections.

Active Construction Projects & Ongoing Business
Phase 2 Guidance
On May 15, Gov. Inslee’s office released a memo discussing the reopening of “professional services,” including architecture offices.  In counties that have reached Phase 2 of the governor’s Safe Start approach, businesses can resume all operations immediately as long as they meet and maintain all requirements, including providing materials, schedules, and equipment needed to comply.  You can find the guidance for reopening for Professional Services here: Guidance for Professional Services. These requirements are significant, and they could be amended at any time by the governor’s office.

Phase 1 Guidance
On March 23 Gov. Inslee issued a “shelter in place” order, called “Stay Home Stay Healthy”, for Washington.  The order outlines the requirements for all people to remain in their homes “except to conduct or participate in essential activities and/or employment in providing essential business services.” The order includes a list of sectors and business functions the governor has designated as “essential,” allowing them to remain open.

On March 25, Governor Inslee released a memo specifically addressing the construction industry, clarifying what parts of the industry are considered “essential” per the order. In the memo he states that, “in general, commercial and residential construction is not authorized under the Proclamation because construction is not considered to be an essential activity.”

The memo goes on to state that only construction related to essential activities, as described in the order, will be considered essential.  Projects considered essential are construction related to essential activities like health care, transportation, energy, defense and critical manufacturing; construction “to further a public purpose related to a public entity,” including publicly financed low-income housing; and emergency repairs.  Inslee further clarified in a press conference that construction related to grocery stores is considered essential.  There is no clarification regarding schools; our interpretation is that construction work on schools is not considered essential, although we are aware of some districts and universities that are moving ahead with construction activity.

Although the state guidance does not specifically reference architecture work, AIA’s interpretation is that such work in support of construction activity is allowed as long as the construction activity is on the state’s essential list.  If your work is considered essential, you do not need to carry a license or paperwork proving that it is.

According to the governor’s order, non-essential business operations must be conducted from home except for “minimum basic operations to a) maintain the value of your inventory, b) preserve the condition of your premises and equipment, c) ensure security, d) process payroll and employee benefits, e) facilitate employees of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences, and f) conduct related functions.”  AIA interprets this to mean that employees can go to the office for limited activities provided that all physical distancing and health and safety measures are adhered to while there.

Posted in Code, Public Policy Board, Uncategorized

COVID-19 Resources Page

As a member-based organization, AIA Seattle is rapidly shifting its response to this public health crisis with remote learning and engagement opportunities, and aggregating regional and national resources for our members. We are here for you during this difficult time, and all staff are continuing to work remotely to serve you. Below, we have compiled a list of membership-, business- and management-related resources to connect you with what you need. Programming updates will continue to be made on our events calendar, and homepage. Check out the webinar recordings from our recent live programming on our Education Programs page.

Have questions or resources you’d like added to this list? Please contact Madison Eggerding, Membership & Development Coordinator at madisone@aiaseattle.org. We will add things here as we find them.

Member & Firm-specific Resources:

On Returning to the Office

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, many offices and firms are shifting focus to strategizing for safe and gradual re-opening and returning to the workplace. We are compiling resources regarding returning to the office on this separate page, including PPE sourcing information and State reccomendations.

Featured Webinar Events
Tech Resources
ARE Resources
  • ArchiPrep is free through August.
  • Our colleagues at AIA San Francisco put together a web-based web-based ARE program that is available to all members. Here you can find their 2020 course schedule, and here is where you can sign up. The second link will allow you to sign up for courses one-by-one, rather than in a chunk per the linked PDF.
  • Prometric has decided to keep all test centers in North America closed until at least May 31, 2020. As a result, NCARB has extended their no-cost rescheduling period for Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) appointments and is adding an additional six-month rolling clock extension to all valid passing scores.
Dues

Project Specific Resources

Look to this separate post on our website for Seattle Code and Permitting resources, as well as updates as we know them for Washington State resources and impacts, including info on Small Business Support.

Best Practice Materials from AIA & AIA Trust:

Financial Resources:

How to Help: 

Additional COVID-19 Resources:

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public

Advocacy Update – March 2020


ARCHITECT ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Seattle Firm Prompts New Rulemaking for Common Sense Bar Design
This report is written by Joe Herrin AIA, Principal at Heliotrope in Seattle.

Heliotrope is fortunate to have collaborated with many of Seattle’s most successful restauranteurs. In our effort to provide them with the best possible design solutions we regularly encounter interesting technical challenges. One persistent challenge has been how to design liquor barriers that meet state liquor board requirements while minimizing impact to spatial flow. These clunky bar-rails are ubiquitous and often awkward, inhibiting a natural circulation flow.

Every challenge presents an opportunity, and in the summer of 2018 Associate Ben Humphrey wrote to the Washington State Liquor Control Board and literally asked, “Is there a way to get this law changed?” A petition followed, and it became clear that the Board was interested in addressing this. Over the following months Ben collaborated with the rulemaking body on refining the language. He recently testified before the Board in Olympia, and this month the new rules were accepted and adopted. The new rules change the game related to how we design bar spaces, greatly improving the opportunity for intuitive flow and creative expression. Now a bar area can be demarcated through a simple change in floor material, plantings, in-floor lighting, and more. There is even language allowing us to propose a solution not expressly codified. The full text of the law can be read here.

Do you have a story of architect advocacy in action? Let us know!


COVID-19 UPDATE

As we face so many unknowns related to the coronavirus, personally and professionally, AIA Seattle is working to identify the areas where the practice of architecture will be impacted, immediately and in the future, and how we can work to support firms and individual architects and help the industry weather the impacts that will come. There are ongoing discussions at the state and local level around adjusting regulations related to codes, permitting, licensing, employment, and active construction projects. We will keep you updated as soon as we have specific details. In the meantime, please let us know what you are hearing that might be helpful to other architects, and we’ll work to collect and share as much information as possible.

2018 Seattle Construction Code Adoption Delayed
On March 19, the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) issued the following announcement related to the 2018 code update scheduled to go into event July 1, 2020:

SDCI is in the process of updating Seattle’s construction codes to the 2018 versions of the building, residential, existing buildings, mechanical, energy, fuel gas, and plumbing codes.  We have been aiming for an effective date of July 1, 2020, to align with the effective date of the Washington State building codes.  However, due to many factors, including the impacts of the COVID-19, the effective date of Seattle’s codes will be delayed until November 1, 2020.  If the 2018 Washington State construction codes effective date is delayed past November 1, we will align the effective date of our codes with the State.

Please visit our code update website for continued information and to review proposed code change documents. If you have questions, please contact Micah Chappell, Technical Code Development Manager, at micah.chappell@seattle.gov.

On March 12, AIA sent a letter to SDCI Director Nathan Torgelson supporting a deferral to provide greater flexibility as architects and others face extraordinary coronavirus measures that impact workplaces and families.

SDCI Closes Public-Facing Resources
SDCI has closed its Applicant Services Center, Public Resource Center, and the 19th floor reception area. Alternative methods of reaching SDCI are available online. Click here for more info.


FEDERAL NEWS

2020 Presidential Primary Election Results
View the results from Washington’s presidential primary election from the Secretary of State here.

YIMBY Act Passes House
The U.S. House of Representatives passed without opposition the YIMBY Act, H.R. 4307, co-sponsored by Washington’s Rep. Denny Heck (D-Olympia). The bill would address the country’s affordable housing crisis by streamlining affordable housing production and zoning for high-density single-family and multifamily housing. It also proposes to reduce hurdles related to affordable housing production by:

  • Reducing minimum lot sizes.
  • Increasing development in areas close to transit centers.
  • Allowing for the construction of duplexes and manufactured homes in areas currently zoned for single-family homes.
  • Increasing the allowable floor area ratio in multifamily housing areas.
  • Providing incentives to produce adaptive reuse projects.

Many of these measures can be found in state legislation considered in recent years, including bills from Washington. The YIMBY Act now goes to the Senate, where it faces a less certain future. At AIA Seattle’s request, AIA National is reviewing this bill with its Government Affairs Council for inclusion in AIA’s housing policy portfolio. More info on the YIMBY Act.


STATE NEWS

Washington’s 2020 Legislative Session Concludes
The State Legislature concluded its 2020 legislative session on March 12 and will not go into special session this year except to address coronavirus-related appropriations or other legislative action. You may read AIA Washington Council’s session wrap-up here. Highlights include passage of C-PACER legislation to provide a private funding mechanism for deep energy and resiliency retrofits; the defeat of licensing bills that had the potential to weaken architect licenses; the defeat of numerous attempts to delay or eliminate the 2018 residential energy code update and to impact the functioning of the State Building Code Council; and some positive steps forward on housing and affordable housing funding. Thanks to all of you who contacted your legislators during the session; your outreach makes a difference!


LOCAL NEWS

Seattle Approves Homelessness Measures
In February, the Seattle City Council passed and Mayor Durkan signed an ordinance sponsored by Councilmember Kshama Sawant to allow up to 40 tent cities, tiny home villages, or parking lots where people living in their cars can camp. The first city-permitted tent cities opened in 2015 and the city currently has eight sites; the 2015 authorization expires this month. The legislation makes it easier to site transitional encampments on land owned by religious organizations, the county, and the state. It also allows encampments in residential zones. Funding for additional villages was not addressed in the ordinance, however; the City Council provided funding for only two additional villages in the 2020 budget.

Also in February, the Council approved an ordinance by Councilmember Sawant to ban residential evictions between Dec. 1 and March 1, with some exceptions. Mayor Durkan allowed the ordinance to become law without her signature.

On March 5, Mayor Durkan announced that the city would expand available shelter space in the wake of coronavirus public health concerns. On March 17, the City Council approved and expanded a moratorium on residential evictions ordered by Durkan.

AIA’s Committee on Homelessness advocates on these and other issues based on AIA’s policy statement on homelessness.


OPPORTUNITIES

Submit your project for AIA Seattle’s 2020 ADU Tour
AIA Seattle’s 2nd Annual ADU Tour is scheduled for June 6, 2020. AIA is currently accepting applications for attached or detached ADUs to present on the tour. Projects must be designed by an AIA member and be located within the Seattle city limits. More info here. Note: the Tour will be postponed until later in the year if necessary, but we encourage you to submit your project by the April 17 deadline.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is currently closed based on recommendations from local and state health officials. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

AIA Washington Council Sustainability Webinar Series Kicks Off March 24
AIA|WA will host a three-part webinar series on sustainability issues, including a review of basic sustainability concepts, the state energy code, the role of architects and the resources available to us, and upcoming changes architects should be aware of. Although all are welcome, this series is not designed for architects who are experts in the field of sustainability; rather, the content is aimed at those who have had less exposure to these concepts. The first webinar is scheduled for March 24, 4:30-5:30 pm. Although the “viewing parties” originally organized in larger cities have been canceled, the webinar will still take place. One HSW credit will be available for participants. More info here.

AIA Seattle Climate Comprehensive Webinar: State, Local + National View – April 7
This session, moved to a webinar, will recap AIA’s work on climate issues across many policy levels. We’ll review what happened in Olympia this year as well as state and local climate policies currently in the works. We’ll also take a look at AIA National’s Big Move on climate and the ongoing work that Shift Zero (AIA is a member) is doing on zero carbon building initiatives. More info here.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Public Policy Board

An update to AIA Seattle members about COVID-19

Dear AIA Seattle Members,

AIA Seattle as an association exists to do together, as an architecture community, what individual members and firms cannot do as easily or as well on their own. Our mission depends on bringing people together. In these unprecedented times, our work will need to look very different, but our goals will remain the same.

What our board and staff most want you to know in this moment – in the midst of these unprecedented times – is that our focus remains on you.

We will cooperate fully with the guidelines of public health officials. Architects pledge to uphold the health, safety and welfare of our community, and those values must also guide our chapter’s actions.

  • The Center for Architecture and Design will remain closed as long as needed to enable our employees to work from home. We will regularly update our websites – cfadseattle.orgaiaseattle.org and designinpublic.org – with closure information. If you need to check on our status, please contact Megan Harmon. Staff are still working and available via email.
  • Committees will continue to meet virtually. All member groups have the tools to meet remotely, and most will begin doing so in April. Watch our websites for the most current updates.
  • Education and events through the spring will be delivered online or rescheduled. AIA Seattle has some powerful education planned through many hours of volunteer effort, and we are committed to offering it despite the challenges.

Community is more important than ever. AIA has always been fundamentally about bringing people together. Although we can’t convene in person, that sense of connectedness has never been more valuable. We are actively looking for new and engaging ways to co-create, share knowledge, and support one another. Seattle Design Festival planners are converting upcoming Design Jams into virtual collaboration opportunities. We are currently evaluating tools to connect members to each other around shared concerns and interests.

We must be adaptive and patient with one another. Things will not be the same for a while. AIA Seattle staff are working hard to adapt on the fly, and inevitably we will stumble and struggle sometimes, as will you.

  • Members, please be patient as we learn new systems and ways of working, explore tools to create virtual community, and adapt our programming to the times. But please do continue to participate. Upcoming programs represent countless hours of volunteer effort, and they deserve an audience.
  • Sponsors and donors, your support is more important than ever. We are committed to delivering on our promises, but that will look different now than what it did two weeks ago. Thank you for your patience as we pivot to respond to current circumstances.
  • Leaders and volunteers, all of us are dealing with the same extreme stressors and demands on our time. We recognize that you have lots of important things to attend to – caring for young children at home, conducting business virtually, ensuring the health and safety of your families – and it may seem hard to prioritize involvement in community institutions. But even in challenging times, working together for common cause is affirming and enriching, and we are committed to finding ways for our work together to continue, recognizing the challenges we all face.

We must be proactive in addressing the new needs of our firms and our broader community. AIA Seattle’s purpose also manifests in anticipating and responding to new challenges facing members. The disruption to the operations of architecture firms and industry partners will be significant. AIA Seattle has already been hearing from members suggesting specific actions we can take to assist members. For example, thanks to a member query, our board sent a letter to SDCI asking that the implementation of the city’s 2018 codes be delayed to provide greater flexibility during the crisis. If you have additional ideas for how our chapter can be helpful, please share them. We will consider every idea and respond based on the resources we are able to marshal.

At the same time, we cannot lose sight of our core mission: champion the central role of architects in creating and sustaining a better built environment.

Thank you for sticking with us. Great members, supporters, and volunteers have made AIA Seattle a model chapter, and we thank you. While there are inevitably big challenges ahead of all of us, our city is resilient, our community is strong, and our organization will weather the storm.

Know, beyond all else, that we care about each and every one of you. We know that your professional and personal lives are being affected by this situation. As you take on new challenges as an individual, spouse, partner, parent, caregiver, neighbor, community member, or friend, know that we are thinking of you. Stay healthy, stay safe, and stay in touch. We are here for you.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public

Earthquake Safety at Home

Posted in Adaptation & Resilience

A message to AIA Seattle members about COVID-19 coronavirus


Dear AIA Seattle Members,

As news of the coronavirus in Washington state leads to increasing action by both public health officials and private businesses, I wanted to share with you the steps AIA Seattle is taking to protect the health of our members and staff while continuing to offer the best member service we can. Thank you for your partnership and flexibility as we all navigate this health challenge together.

Encouraging the sick to stay home
Following the advice of public health officials, we ask that any member or employee experiencing flu-like symptoms stay home and recover.

Offering video access
For major education programs like our Project Management Series, we will be videotaping content and sharing it with individuals whose health concerns prevent them from attending in person. We will work with those individuals to secure CEUs for those who need to attend by video.

Accepting cancellations
If health concerns prevent you from attending an event for which you have already registered, AIA Seattle has extended our no-penalty cancellation policy for late cancellations.

Rescheduling meetings
If committees or other groups meeting in our space wish to reschedule or cancel, we ask that you contact staff so that we can include notification in our enews and online.

Assessing event and facilities standards
We are working with vendors, caterers, and our partners at the Center to enhance safety. At the Center, we are taking extra care to clean surfaces and provide hand-washing facilities. Our caterers take food safety very seriously, and have rigid standards for food prep and service. They ask in return that our guests do their part and wash hands prior to joining the buffet line.

Supporting local businesses
While the news about COVID-19 is concerning, we are also keenly aware that cancelling events has a negative impact on members, venues, and particularly the small local businesses we use to cater and support our events. We will consider cancelling events when it seems prudent, but guard against premature cancellations that may hurt the partners whose businesses depend on us.

We will continue to monitor the situation, and may evolve our response as circumstance requires. Thank you for partnering with us.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public

AIA’s 2020 ADU Tour is Moving to an Online ADU Showcase

ONLINE SHOWCASE OVERVIEW
AIA Seattle’s 2020 public tour of built DADUs and AADUs in Seattle has been cancelled. However, we are moving our tour online with a showcase of AIA member ADUs via an online tour covering a larger geographic area. We will include photos, site plans, and other info about your project in addition to your contact information.

ELIGIBILITY
Projects must meet the following criteria to included:

  • The project must be a built ADU or DADU.
  • It must be designed by an AIA member.
  • It must be permitted as legal attached or detached ADU (i.e., a separate dwelling unit).
  • It must be located in AIA Seattle’s operating area (King, Snohomish, Kitsap, Clallam, Jefferson, Skagit, Island, Whatcom, and San Juan counties).
  • You must be willing to share cost information.

To begin, entries are limited to one per firm/sole practitioner. Seattle projects will remain eligible for inclusion in a future in-person tour.

CALL FOR PROJECT SUBMISSIONS
If you have a completed project that you would like to submit for consideration and that meets the above eligibility criteria, please complete the Submission Form and return it to Kirsten Smith.  There is no deadline (projects will be added to the website as they are received) and no fee for submitting your project.

 SHOWCASE FORMAT
This sample webpage offers an idea of what the ADU Showcase will look like. Your ADU project will appear as one of the smaller boxes below the large image. Clicking on the image will take users to a page dedicated to your project that offers additional text and links to the documents. You will have an opportunity to review your ADU entry prior to it going live.

INQUIRIES
Please address any questions and e-mail all submissions to:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy and Advocacy
AIA Seattle + AIA Washington Council
206-708-3199 | Email Kirsten

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Click here to view advertising and sponsorship opportunities, or contact Kristen Lound to learn more.

Posted in For the Public, Uncategorized

AIA Seattle Announces 2020 Fellows

AIA eagle icon with text "AIA College of Fellows"

Christopher Eseman headshot

Chris Eseman FAIA has transformed convention center design, creating iconic places that engage visitors in the urban landscape, enrich civic life, invigorate neighborhoods, and connect convention delegates with the community. Chris has led more than 50 convention center projects from programming and planning to design in the US and abroad. Chris is widely recognized for his expertise and is often asked to present at national and international conferences. His work has been widely covered by national, regional, and local media, and has received numerous local and national design awards. As the convention center practice leader at LMN for 28 years, he has mentored the firm’s next generation, successfully preparing his colleagues for leadership positions in the firm and the broader industry.

David Goldberg headshot

David Goldberg FAIA is President and Design Partner at the interdisciplinary design firm Mithun, with offices in Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. He has been instrumental in helping grow Mithun’s mission-driven practice to national prominence, and has served in virtually all areas of firm leadership, with a keen focus on integrated design and the role of a designer as a collaborator, listener, and leader. Over the past two decades, Mithun has been recognized with six AIA Committee on the Environment Top Ten Green projects, the AIA Northwest and Pacific Region Firm award, and more than 200 national design awards spanning each of the firm’s disciplines. David’s projects include the IslandWood environmental education center on Bainbridge Island, Chatham University’s Eden Hall Campus in Pittsburgh, and the Perot Family Offices in Dallas. David lectures nationally on integrated design and sustainability and has served in numerous volunteer leadership positions for notable conservation and education organizations including Woodland Park Zoo, IslandWood, and Earthshare of Washington. He is currently serving on the University of Washington Foundation Board, representing the College of Built Environments. David received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of Virginia and his Master of Architecture from the University of Washington.

Chris Meek headshot

Christopher Meek FAIA, IES is Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Washington and Director of the Center for Integrated Design and the Integrated Design Lab (UW IDL) at the University’s College of Built Environments. His research focuses on the integration of natural systems in building design to improve indoor environmental quality and building energy efficiency. Prof. Meek is nationally recognized in the area of daylighting, integrated lighting design, and building energy performance research. Over the past decade, Prof. Meek has consulted on over 20 million square feet of commercial and institutional buildings including working, learning, and healing environments including the net-zero energy Bullitt Center in Seattle, WA. His research has been funded by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, the Illuminating Engineering Society, the Bullitt Foundation, and the American Institute of Architects. Prof. Meek teaches graduate and undergraduate level courses on building design and technology at the UW Department of Architecture. He is co-author of Daylighting Design in the Pacific Northwest and Daylighting and Integrated Lighting Design.

The work of these Fellows demonstrates the power of architecture to address issues of sustainability with collaborative design, utilize natural systems in building design, and integrate convention center design with the community.

The Fellowship program was developed to elevate those architects who have made a significant contribution to architecture and society and who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession. Election to fellowship not only recognizes the achievements of architects as individuals but also their significant contribution to architecture and society on a national level.

Out of a total AIA membership of over 90,000, there are approximately 3,000 distinguished with the honor of fellowship and honorary fellowship.

The 2020 Fellows will be honored at an investiture ceremony at the AIA Conference on Architecture in Los Angeles on May 15 and celebrated at the AIA Seattle President’s Dinner in early June.

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession, Home Page

Announcing the 2020 Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship Recipient

Travel Scholarship 2020

Cohousing is not a new idea, but it is often thought of as a housing solution for young families, digital nomads, hippie communities, or for young frequent travelers. Current senior living offerings are often too expensive and lack the communal element that treats aspects of loneliness and isolation. Cohousing projects designed and geared towards seniors and their needs could solve these issues as an alternative solution to the overpriced luxury senior living options that exist today.  Existing senior housing options often do not fit the needs of the community they are attempting to serve. By visiting some of the first existing senior cohousing projects, I hope to illustrate it’s inherent benefits and possibilities. I hope to provide insight into how these communities are formed, how they are funded and how they succeed, illustrating that senior cohousing is a viable and better housing option.

As this year’s recipient of AIA Seattle’s Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship, Queena will travel to London, Paris, Oakland, CA and Portland, OR to document senior cohousing projects that were the first of its kind in their perspective cities. These projects were chosen to understand the complexities of starting a new cohousing community in varying urban environments. Interviews of community members and documentation of the projects will be conducted to gain a full understanding of the formation of these communities, their funding models, and the design of the architecture.

View Queena’s proposal here.

Queena Li Headshot Queena Yi, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is an architectural designer with over six years of experience and is anticipating licensure this year. Her previous work experience at Katerra and Perkins + Will, where she managed senior housing projects and a WeWork | WeLive project, provided the foundation for this Travel Scholarship proposal. Previous to pursuing a career in architecture, Queena worked for over a decade at various startup tech companies in San Francisco and Seattle. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the University of California at San Diego and an M.Arch from the University of Washington. During her studies at the UW, Queena received a Scan Design Fellowship to study at the Royal Danish Academy in Copenhagen for one year. Her time in Copenhagen provided the groundwork for her thesis project, Memento Mori | A Non-Sectarian Memorial Site in Seattle, which was later selected for the AIA 2015 Emerging Professionals Exhibit. Queena has been active in the design community by participating in the UW PAC, Design in Public, and Seattle Architecture Foundation at various capacities.

Queena will be recognized, along with our 2020 Fellows and Honorees, at the President’s Dinner hosted by AIA Seattle in June, final date TBC.

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

Announcing the 2020 AIA National Honorees

2020 Young Architects Award

JoAnn Hindmarsh Wilcox AIAJoAnn Hindmarsh Wilcox AIA is a licensed Architect in Oregon and Washington, where she practices as a Principal, Design Lead and Public Engagement Strategist for Mahlum. In her tenure at the firm, she has made a significant contribution in establishing Mahlum as a nationally recognized design firm. JoAnn designs consciously and is motivated by action and impact. An emerging national leader in design for learning, JoAnn’s built work explores architecture’s connection to regenerative social and ecological outcomes, and its power to uplift the next generation. Her work highlights a balance between persistent curiosity and a quiet sensitivity to place, craft and the human experience through design within the public realm. Operating in an area that is regularly constrained by budget and entrenched conventions, she is able to sensitively listen and provide innovative solutions that influence K-12 design nationally. Her advocacy has brought social justice to the foreground in the conversation on school design, and her public work for communities-in-need models the social impact architecture can have. She is noted for creating buildings as deeply impactful as beautiful and has been recognized with more than 80 awards for design excellence from the local to the international level, including a 2019 National AIA Honor Award for Arlington Elementary. A graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, JoAnn was also the recipient of an AIA Henry Adams Medal and in 2018 received AIA Seattle’s Young Architect Award. In addition, JoAnn volunteers, juries, mentors, publishes and lectures widely; engaging civic issues that speak to the transformational power of design.

2020 Associates Award

Stacey Crumbaker Assoc AIAStacey Crumbaker Assoc. AIA is an associate principal at Mahlum, where she is focused on work that serves the greater public rather than individuals. With accredited degrees in both architecture and interior design, Stacey balances her work across two intertwined disciplines and advocates for the development of stronger bonds between practitioners. By cultivating a practice that responds to the human experience, she proves that architecture has a unique ability to foster community. She has led multiple designs for the region’s public schools, and her work often ties together the poetics of design with the tectonics of construction. Her work was informed by the receipt of the Sean Murphy Travel Fellowship, which sent her to Antarctica to research how such an extreme environment can shape livable spaces. She carried the lessons learned there back to Seattle, where she breathes new life into mundane spaces to inspire and enrich the communities she serves. Stacey’s path to leadership began with important roles for the Northern Pacific Chapter of the International Interior Design Association, where she fostered the organization’s advocacy programs to advance design excellence, legislation, and community outreach. With her unique perspective on practice, Stacey has also served on AIA’s Interior Architecture Advisory Group since 2017, and she has been instrumental in shaping the knowledge community’s long-term vision. Stacey has pushed designers across all disciplines to test the boundaries of design. As past-president of the board of Design in Public, she has prompted community dialogue focused on the impact of design in urban life. She has successfully gathered architects, interior designers, planners, and artists to participate in a wide range of programming at the annual festival.

2020 Honorary Membership

Lisa Richmond Hon. AIALisa Richmond, Hon. AIA and Executive Director of AIA Seattle has channeled her belief in the power of design to engage the public in critical issues of sustainability, livability, and resilience. Always providing maximum organizational impact, her actions and innovation have helped architects lead positive change in our communities. Lisa has worked to develop a culture of advocacy at AIA Seattle, recognizing that solving the profession’s pressing issues can only happen through policy and regulatory change. She has developed systems, such as the chapter’s public policy board, to both engage and deploy its members to great effect. AIA Seattle is one of the few local chapters to host a full-time position focused on advocacy, and the infrastructure Lisa has developed has become a model for components across the country. To directly foster carbon reduction in the built environment, Lisa led the chapter in its support of a state carbon tax. She was also a partner in the formation of Shift Zero, a cohort of 20 organizations from around Puget Sound striving toward zero carbon buildings. Her propensity for strategic thinking led to an appointment to the AIA Strategic Planning Task Force where she has championed a focus on organizational impact and accountability. Previously, Lisa served on the AIA Advocacy Capacity Building Task Force, where she worked with colleagues to unite a fractured group and create recommendations that were unanimously adopted by AIA’s board of directors. The list of Lisa’s accomplishments is lengthy and includes a Loeb Fellowship from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a place on the Seattle mayor’s Green Building Task Force, and service as a climate reality mentor for Al Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Corps. A born leader, her outlook on advocacy has become a national model that has greatly benefited AIA.

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

Advocacy Update – February 2020

Multifamily Housing

FEDERAL NEWS

Support Federal Legislation to Phase Down HFCs
Architects Advocate, an independent group of architects and firms formed to advocate for policies to mitigate climate change, is calling for architects to support two bipartisan bills in Congress that would phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) commonly used in refrigerants and replace them with climate-friendlier alternatives. They ask architects to consider signing on to a letter written by E2, a partner of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). You may review the letter and sign here (by signing, you are not committing to attend the Special Event on Feb. 28 – the form is a bit confusing).

AIA Opposes Trump Administration Proposal on Design for Federal Buildings
The Trump Administration is considering a draft executive order that would officially designate “classical” architecture as the preferred style for the following building types: federal courthouses, all federal public buildings in the Capitol region, and all other federal public buildings over $50 million in modern dollars. The AIA at all levels strongly and unequivocally opposes this change in policy to promote any style of architecture over another for these types of federal buildings across the country. AIA Seattle sent a letter to the Administration expressing our opposition. Individuals interested in commenting on the proposal can do so via AIA National’s grassroots website here.


STATE NEWS

Washington’s 2020 Legislative Session Passes the Halfway Mark
The state legislative session in Olympia has reached the point where all bills must have passed on to their opposite house or they are dead. For details on the legislative session and AIA’s priority issues, you may read AIA Washington Council’s latest Legislative Update here. If you would like to weigh in with legislators on any of these issues, or if you have comments for AIA|WA, please contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

New Solid Waste Guidance from SPU
Seattle Public Utilities Solid Waste has updated CAM 1301, its guidance document for solid waste planning for new and redeveloping buildings, as well as the Checklist for Designers that provides SPU with the data it needs to review and approve solid waste storage, access, and collection designs. AIA members participated in focus groups with SPU and provided feedback as it developed these guidelines.

Mayor Issues Executive Order on a Green New Deal for Seattle
In January, Mayor Durkan signed an Executive Order committing Seattle to operate all new or substantially altered City of Seattle buildings without fossil fuels and develop a strategy to eliminate fossil fuel use in existing city buildings by January 2021. The Executive Order also requires annual Green New Deal reports through 2030 and directs the Office of Sustainability and Environment to engage stakeholders to achieve the following goals of the Green New Deal:

  • Reduce pollution to limit the average global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C;
  • Promote economic opportunity and inclusive access to stable, well-paying jobs; and
  • Advance environmental justice by ensuring the benefits and investments of the clean energy transition accrue to those communities and populations historically most burdened by the fossil fuel economy.

AIA Seattle supports these moves and hopes that the city’s actions will help further work to address emissions from privately-owned buildings, including a ban on new gas hookups that is currently being considered by the City Council.

Mayor’s Affordable Middle-Income Housing Advisory Council Offers Housing Recommendations
In January, Mayor Durkan’s Affordable Middle-Income Housing Advisory Council offered its report recommending a suite of strategies that government, the private sector, and community organizations can act on to increase housing options available to middle-income families and individuals. The recommendations, which will be considered by Mayor Durkan over the coming months, are suggested tools to help create more opportunities for homeownership, bring more housing online faster, and increase housing options in neighborhoods throughout the city. The Council recommended three high-impact actions:

  • Reduce costs of building housing by promoting partnerships with private sector investors and philanthropic dollars for innovative real estate financing.
  • Advocate to the state to extend the Multifamily Tax Exemption (MFTE) program beyond 12 years of affordability.
  • Reduce construction costs and bring new homes online as quickly as possible by reforming permitting practices.

Read the full report here. AIA Seattle advocates for policies that address housing affordability and access at all income levels. We support these measures and continue to work with the city and affiliated groups to reduce permit times, in particular.


OPPORTUNITIES

Join AIA Seattle’s Outreach Efforts to Address Housing Policy
AIA’s Housing Task Force has identified areas where the chapter can support policies related to providing more housing flexibility and infill in the city’s neighborhoods as well as addressing housing availability and affordability issues as part Seattle’s next comprehensive plan growth strategy. Below are areas of outreach that we will be focusing on throughout 2020. If you are interested in participating in any of these efforts, or if you have other comments or suggestions, please let Kirsten know.

  • CfAD Gallery Exhibit. Dec. 2020-Feb. 2021.  AIA’s gallery space is reserved during this time period for an exhibit on how Seattle will navigate changes to single family zoning as it embarks on its next comprehensive plan update. We’re looking for volunteers to participate on a curatorial team that will flesh out how we want to showcase issues related to zoning, missing middle housing, and Seattle’s growth strategy in terms of messaging and exhibit take-aways.
  • 2020 Seattle Design Festival. AIA is looking for members willing to brainstorm and implement an exhibit or other event on these same housing themes for this year’s Design Festival.
  • Tours
    • AIA’s 2nd Annual ADU Tour is scheduled for June 6, 2020. We welcome volunteers interested in working on the committee that is organizing the tour.
    • Missing Middle Housing Tours: AIA’s Housing Task Force is interested in creating walking tours that focus on existing missing middle housing in locations such as Capitol Hill, the Volunteer Park area, the Pine Street Cottages, and elsewhere.  We are looking for architects interested in helping to identify locations and lead tours.
  • Cross-Advocacy Group Public Campaign. The Housing Task Force is interested in engaging with other groups in a citywide, Minneapolis-style campaign around providing infill in single family zones. We’ll be meeting with other groups currently doing this work such as Sightline and the Urbanist. We’d love to have volunteers who would like to help with this effort.

Apply to Join the Seattle Planning Commission
The Seattle Planning Commission is looking for new Commissioners. The Planning Commission advises the Mayor, City Council, and city departments on citywide planning goals and policies and provides them with independent advice on land use, zoning, and transportation and housing issues. Applicants must currently reside in Seattle. For more information and how to apply, click here. Applications are due by February 28.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
AIA Seattle members and others are invited to attend these policy-focused committee meetings, which occur monthly:

  • Transportation Task Force Monthly Meeting: March 9, 5:30-6:30 @ CFAD
  • Housing Task Force Monthly Meeting: March 12, noon-1:15 pm @ CFAD

 Let Kirsten know if you’d like to be added to the email list for either task force.

Passive House Northwest Annual Conference – Seattle, March 12-14

Mass Timber Hackathon – Portland, March 20-22

International Mass Timber Conference – Portland, March 24-26

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

 

Posted in Public Policy Board

AIA Seattle is hiring!

AIA Seattle is hiring

AIA Seattle is committed to progressive and equitable compensation standards, informed by our JUST certification and a bi-annual compensation study to benchmark against other area non-profits.  We provide generous benefits, respect work-life balance, and allow flexible work schedules.

We are a small office of 13 highly collaborative team members that believe in what we’re doing and are excited by the prospect of helping our members make a difference in our city.

We actively seek applicants with a range of backgrounds, viewpoints and work styles, and one of our organizational goals is to support industry-wide culture change, so that architecture and the allied professions actively attract and retain more people of color, women, and non-binary people. Through all our programs and processes, we are working to value and promote diversity and we have a certified IDI trainer on staff.

Associate Director of Growth & Operations
Finance Manager

Posted in Home Page