2022 Small Firm Series

In this 3-part Small Firm Series, Rena M. Klein and her colleagues at Charrette Venture Group will share fundamental knowledge, strategies, tools, and resources for successful small firm adaptation and transformation. Tailored to the needs and interests of small firm practitioners, these interactive half-day sessions will include compelling presentations, case study features, workshop activities, and ample time for peer-to-peer discussion. Both full series registration and single-session registration are available.

Join us in-person on July 6, and online September 7 and December 7 for AIA Seattle’s highly-interactive 2022 Small Firm Series. Register for the full series to maximize and build upon your learning (12 AIA LU), or register for a single session for a more tailored focus (4 AIA LU each). Space is limited to 60 total registrants per session. 


FULL SERIES COST

Includes continuing education credit (12 AIA LU) + breakfast and light refreshments for Session 1 in-person. All sessions and speakers subject to change. 

$214 AIA Member
$214 Government + Partners
$122 Associate Member
$354 Non-Member
$30 Student

 

Early Bird Deadline: Monday, June 20, 2022. After this time, the price increases 15%. Final Registration Deadline: Monday, July 4, 2022. 

Reduced rate options are available! Please submit the Continuing Education Scholarship / Reduced Rate Request form via email by Monday, June 20, 5:00PM PT. 


SESSION DATES + A LA CARTE REGISTRATION

Session 1 | Stabilize Your Small Firm with Strategic Business Planning
July 6, 2022 // IN-PERSON (Venue TBC) // 9:00am-1:00pm PT // Class Credit: 4 LU

  • Rena M. Klein, FAIA | Partner, Charrette Venture Group
  • Lucas Gray, Assoc. AIA |  Senior Management Consultant, Charrette Venture Group

Session 2 | Effective Strategies for Advancing Emerging Leaders and Transitioning Ownership 
September 7, 2022 // ONLINE // 9:00am-1:00pm PT // Class Credit: 4 LU

  • Rena M. Klein, FAIA | Partner, Charrette Venture Group
  • Sun Joo Kim | Senior Management Consultant, Charrette Venture Group

Session 3 | Operations and Design: New Approaches to Old Ways of Working 
December 7, 2022 //  ONLINE // 9:00am-1:00pm PT // Class Credit: 4 LU

  • Sun Joo Kim | Senior Management Consultant, Charrette Venture Group
  • Lucas Gray, Assoc. AIA |  Senior Management Consultant, Charrette Venture Group

All sessions and speakers subject to change. 


SESSION DESCRIPTIONS + LEARNING OBJECTIVES

July 6, 2022 | Stabilize Your Small Firm with Strategic Business Planning (In-Person)

Managing a growing design firm offers a variety of unique challenges and opportunities. An unpredictable business environment and a quickening pace of change requires firm owners to adapt, but how can firm owners proactively prepare for growth in uncertain times? We will demystify the business planning process. Each attendee will develop their own business plan outline in this interactive workshop – so you can leave inspired, organized, and one step ahead of the competition!

  • Explore strategies for business planning within an environment of unpredictability, including case studies & best practices.
  • Understand basic business plan components including the interconnection between
    purpose, finance, marketing, & operations.
  • Learn how to use critical tools and processes for successful firm business planning.
  • Develop the outline for your own firm’s business plan.

September 7, 2022 | Effective Strategies for Advancing Emerging Leaders and Transitioning Ownership (Online)

How do firms succeed in transitioning ownership and leadership? When should firm leaders begin thinking about ownership transition, and what options are available to firm founders approaching retirement? How can successors truly leverage the knowledge and connections of the founder? Planning for leadership transition brings up many questions and few answers; however if a firm leader intends to transfer ownership to the next generation, emerging leaders need mentorship, tools, and skills to succeed. This session will outline structured stages of professional development for emerging leaders as a key component to effective ownership transition.

  • Discover the importance of setting goals and understanding preferred outcomes in planning for
    ownership transition.
  • Understand options for ownership transition pathways depending on timeframe to retirement
    and openness to sharing leadership.
  • Explore best practices for identifying the right person to be a successor and how to create a
    framework for a partnership agreement.
  • Learn how to prepare emerging leadership for a future ownership role through structured stages
    of professional development.

December 7, 2022 | Operations and Design: New Approaches to Old Ways of Working (Online)

Business planning and professional development mean little without proper implementation. How will you structure your team for the greatest results? What bottlenecks are slowing down your design execution? How can adopting new ways of working transform your firm? This session will explore alternative ways of thinking about your day-to-day operations using case studies from other small design firms. Equitable business practice will be discussed as a paradigm-shifting leadership model with a wide lens of understanding.

  • Visualize your firm’s structure and potential for growth using organizational design tools.
  • Hear case studies about other small firms experimenting with alternative organizational design
    and shaking up their operational norms.
  • Learn about different technological resources available that are helping small firms streamline
    operations.
  • Explore different approaches to incorporating diversity, equity, and inclusion into small firm
    leadership and team management.

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE CHARRETTE VENTURE GROUP AND OUR SMALL FIRM SERIES SPONSORS:

 

AP Design Professionals | Hargis Engineers, Inc. | Precision Property Measurements


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Zoe Guckenheimer, Programs Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Kristen Lound, Associate Director of Growth & Operations at AIA Seattle

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – March 2022

STATE NEWS

State Legislative Session Update
The state legislature adjourned for the year on March 10. Thank to you all of you who supported AIA’s efforts in Olympia. Here is a list of AIA’s highlights from the session (you can read an overview of non-AIA issues here); look for more details from AIA|WA next week.

Climate
Key building electrification bills fell afoul of opposition from the gas utilities, homebuilders, and some unions, including HB 1770 to develop a voluntary residential energy reach code that local governments could opt to use instead of baseline state code and two bills that would have required utilities to begin the transition to electric power and allow public utilities to offer customer incentives for electrification. Bills that passed included SB 5722 to extend some state building performance requirements to smaller commercial and multi-family buildings and HB 1280 to require an analysis of the use of all-electrification systems as part of the pre-design work for large state buildings. The biggest loss was HB 1099, which would have added a climate element to the state’s Growth Management Act requirements. This legislation needed to pass this year to impact the 2024 comp plan updates. It passed both houses and passed the Senate a second time but failed to receive a vote on the House floor to approve the conference committee version of the bill in the final minutes of the session.

AIA|WA opposed legislation that would have required a combination of green roof technology and solar on all commercial and multi-family buildings over 50,000 sq ft because it did not offer flexibility or choice; we expect to see a version of this bill back next year.

Housing
The legislature continues to be good at passing bills related to SEPA and local government taxing mechanisms for affordable housing, but its record is poor at providing state mandates on local zoning to increase housing capacity. AIA-supported legislation that passed included SB 5818 to limit SEPA and GMA appeals on affordable housing projects and HB 1643 to provide for a real estate excise tax (REET) exemption for selling property to nonprofits and public housing authorities to use for affordable housing. Legislation that did not pass included HB 1660 to prohibit restrictions related to ADUs and, most notably, HB 1782 on missing middle housing, which started out by requiring fourplexes to sixplexes in areas traditionally dedicated to single-family detached housing (depending on city size and proximity to frequent transit). HB 1882 to create a housing benefit district pilot program to plan and fund land acquisition for affordable housing near major transit stops also failed to pass.

Practice
AIA opposed HB 2049 to eliminate local plan review for most plans stamped by an architect or engineer; the bill did not pass but the concept drew a number of Republican and Democratic co-sponsors in the belief that it would speed up housing production. AIA will be meeting with these legislators over the summer to talk about the importance of plan review and to offer alternative ideas on how the state could support expediting the permitting process (if you have ideas on this, please let us know!). HB 1592 would have allowed provisional licenses for military spouses moving to Washington with a license from another state. AIA|WA was neutral on the legislation because it would have allowed licensing authorities, including the Board for Architects, to determine whether another state’s qualifications are equal to Washington’s – but the bill failed to pass.

For questions about any of these bills or other legislation under consideration, contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

Comprehensive Plan
Seattle has released a name for its Comp Plan effort due in 2024 – One Seattle Plan – and it now has a website. Required by the state to plan for how the city will accommodate growth over the next two decades, the Comp Plan will address crucial questions around how we distribute opportunity, what our neighborhoods should look like, and what changes we need to make to create a more sustainable and resilient city. You can provide feedback directly to the city  via its Comp Plan Survey. You can be part of AIA’s effort by joining our Comp Plan Work Group, which meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday of the month from 12-1pm. Or, you can sign up to receive updates about our efforts so that you can plug in wherever you like. Contact Kirsten for more info.

Seattle Tree Ordinance
Seattle is considering new rules on tree protections which are significantly more restrictive than existing requirements. The ordinance would expand the types and sizes of trees that are regulated, require more notice of tree removal, establish payment in lieu of for tree replacement, and more. More info about the proposals is available here. Most of the provisions are currently being appealed after the city issued a finding of non-significance under SEPA, but there is current legislation (CB 120207) related to tree service providers and public notice requirements around tree removal before the City Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee. A public hearing will be held on that bill on March 23 at 2pm. You may comment by calling in to the hearing or by emailing committee members directly. A vote on the bill will be scheduled for a future meeting.

AIA is seeking member feedback on all the provisions in the draft tree ordinance, as well as on how these rules should be prioritized when balancing other city priorities. We’ll use your feedback to help inform our work on these issues. Please consider submitting your comments via our Tree Ordinance Survey or contact Kirsten with feedback.

Seattle Building Performance Standards
Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment (OSE) is conducting stakeholder and community engagement on creating draft legislation for new building performance standards for commercial and multifamily buildings 20,000 sq ft and larger to reduce carbon emissions and transition towards cleaner buildings. The legislation will set carbon emissions targets that would become gradually stronger over time, reaching net-zero carbon emissions buildings by 2050. OSE will present on the potential regulations and take your comments on April 5, noon-1:30pm via Zoom. Register here.

Design Review
As mandated by the City Council in this year’s budget, OPCD and SDCI are working to put together a plan to evaluate the city’s Design Review program by conducting a Race and Equity Toolkit (RET) analysis of Design Review; reviewing Design Review outcomes and departures; analyzing whether the program increases housing costs; reviewing best practices from other cities; and putting together a stakeholder group to recommend program revisions. AIA is interested in hearing about your experiences with Design Review in Seattle and other cities; we’ll use your answers to help inform AIA Seattle’s position and ongoing work on the program. Please take our Design Review Survey or contact Kirsten with feedback.


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Planning Commission Seeks New Member
The Seattle Planning Commission is seeking a new commissioner. The Commission advises the mayor, City Council, and city departments on citywide planning goals, policies, and plans and provides them with independent advice on land use, zoning, transportation, housing, and related issues. The Commission also stewards the city’s Comprehensive Plan. Applicants must be current residents of Seattle and be able to attend a minimum of three Commission meetings per month (currently held online), with occasional community meetings. Send a letter of interest and resume by April 1 via email to Vanessa Murdock, the Commission’s executive director.

Washington Board for Architects Position Open
The Washington State Board for Architects will have a Board Member position available starting in June 2022. The seven-member, governor-appointed board is made up of one member of the public and six registered architects who reside in Washington and have at least eight years of experience in responsible charge of architectural work. The Board’s primary function is to protect the public’s health, safety, and welfare through regulating the practice of architecture. Board member responsibilities include:

  • Attending board meetings (approx. four a year)
  • Participating in board committees for specific projects
  • Acting as a case manager or as part of the judicial panel in disciplinary cases
  • Representing the board to the profession and the public
  • Attending national council meetings as needed
  • Reviewing applications as needed

More information about this position is available here. Applications can be found via the governor’s website, here (nomination to join the board is a gubernatorial appointment), and should be submitted by April 15.

Public Comment Period Open for West Seattle and Ballard Light Rail Extension
Members of the public can comment on the Draft EIS analysis for extending light rail to West Seattle and Ballard, including providing feedback on routes and station alternatives. The survey is open until April 28. Virtual public meetings are also scheduled throughout March. More info here.


We would love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy + Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-708-3199 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Seattle Tree Ordinance

In February, the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) and the Office of Sustainability and Environment (OSE) released a draft SEPA ordinance on tree protections. The ordinance would expand the types and sizes of trees that are regulated, require more notice of tree removal, establish payment in lieu of for tree replacement, and more. AIA is seeking member feedback on these provisions, most of which are currently under SEPA appeal.

The below information comes from Councilmember Dan Strauss’ office and this overview document from SDCI and OSE. The document provides additional background information as well as more detail on each of the recommended actions.

SEPA Draft Director’s Report: Tree Protections Update

SDCI and OSE have prepared draft updates to the Land Use and Tree Protection Codes that would implement the strategies from Resolution 31902 (2019) to increase tree protection consistent with the goals and policies of the 20152035 Comprehensive Plan and the 2020 Urban Forest Management Plan (UFMP). This draft legislation would respond to the direction in the resolution from City Council and allow for the expansion of the tree protections by accomplishing the following:

  1. Expand the types and sizes of trees that are regulated, including a new definition of significant trees;
  2. Regulate significant trees 12 inches in diameter and larger;
  3. Simplify provisions, including allowing development standards to be modified to aid in tree preservation as an administrative process without requiring Design Review, while maintaining Design Review as an option in multifamily and commercial zones;
  4. Establish a payment option for tree replacement (payment in lieu);
  5. Support tracking of tree preservation, removal, and replacement; and
  6. Increase penalties for violations of tree regulations.

The draft ordinance and updated business practices fall into these major categories:

  1. Requires tree service providers to register with the City
  2. Prohibits tree service providers who significantly violate tree protections from working in Seattle
  3. Requires public notice for tree removals

These changes are provided for in Council Bill 120207, currently before the Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee. The language is not part of the SEPA draft.

  1. Limits property owners tree removals to trees under 12” in diameter and establishes property owner self-reporting
  2. Defines significant trees as 6” diameter or greater
  3. Requires replacement of significant trees 12” diameter or greater removed through development
  4. Increases illegal tree removal penalties by 50%

  1. Establishes species-by-species size thresholds for Exceptional Trees (starting at 6” diameter), which cannot be removed in many circumstances
  2. Expands overall Exceptional Tree threshold to 24” in diameter from 30” and add tree groves and heritage trees

Significant trees and tree replacement requirements
The draft ordinance would require any significant tree 12 inches or greater in diameter removed as part of development to be either replaced on-site or mitigated by payment in-lieu of replacement, unless hazardous. This would allow for a property owner to remove up to three smaller diameter trees per year that are under 12 inches in diameter outside of development, which aids and supports a private property owner’s decision such as to have a garden and/or increase solar access.

Tree replacement requirements would continue to be based on the size of the tree removed as well as the proposed payment option. The replacement requirements are:

  • Each exceptional and significant tree that is removed in association with development in all zones shall be replaced by one or more new trees, the size and species of which shall be determined by the Director.
  • The tree replacement required shall be designed to result, upon maturity, in a canopy cover that is at least equal to the canopy cover prior to tree removal.
  • Preference is for onsite replacement. When onsite replacement cannot be achieved, or is not appropriate as determined by the Director, preference for offsite replacement is on public property.

Ecological Function
The draft ordinance would give SDCI arborist staff discretion to evaluate the ecological function of significant trees over 12 inches in diameter and all exceptional trees and potential exceptional trees and determine the likelihood that the trees will live to maturity due to factors including health and physical condition, development site constraints, and environmental conditions external to the development site. Ecological function would be further used to determine whether trees in these two categories would be required to be protected or, if removed, replaced according to the provisions of the tree code.

  1. Charge $436 for removal of significant trees larger than 12” in diameter
  2. Charge $17.87/square inch of trunk for removal of exceptional trees
  3. Payments calibrated to allow City replanting to replace lost tree canopy

 

SEPA Appeal

The city received a SEPA appeal from the Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish County and several real estate entities challenging items 2-4 above. The appeal challenges the city’s determination of non-significance and seeks to force the city to prepare a full EIS. The Hearing Examiner will take up this appeal, and the City Council cannot consider these three proposals until that appeal is resolved.

Posted in Advocacy

2022 Fellowship Announcement

Kjell Anderson FAIA

Kjell Anderson FAIA, LEED Fellow, practices architecture and serves as a Principal and the Director of Sustainable Design at LMN Architects, working with all of LMN’s clients to set and exceed sustainable design goals. He wrote the first architect-centered book on energy modeling, co-authored AIA’s first policy statement on climate change, and has spoken extensively on energy, water, materials, and embodied carbon. He founded the Seattle Hub of the Carbon Leadership Forum and serves on the AIA National Committee on the Environment and the Washington State Building Code Council where he chairs the Energy Code Technical Advisory Group. A lifelong Washingtonian, he lives in Seattle with his wife and two daughters and enjoys playing music and soccer.

Posted in Fellows and Honors

International Women’s Day 2022

A collage of Women

In principle and in practice, AIA Seattle values and seeks diverse and inclusive participation within the field of architecture. Over 60% of AIA Seattle leaders are women, including Board, Committee Chairs, and Staff, and our chapter continues to exceed the national average for women members.

Learn more about our committees working to advance equity within the profession, including Women in Design and Diversity Roundtable.


Women in Design Committee Updates

The Women in Design Committee (WiD) celebrates women in the design professions and supports their professional development and leadership growth by providing a forum for thoughtful discussion and networking. The committee meets the fourth Thursday of every month at noon, currently via Zoom due to COVID-19. AIA Seattle members, allied members, and sponsors are encouraged to join as well as other professionals in the design community. New and interested members are welcome at any monthly meeting, no pre-registration is required.

Subscribe to WiD’s newsletter for updates, events, and meetings.

Articles of Note

Posted in Diversity Roundtable, For the Profession, For the Public, Women in Design

2022 Culture Change in Practice: A Leadership Cohort

This four-part, peer-based learning program was designed by a team of architects and allied professionals to specifically provide architecture and allied firms the tools and community to meet the explicit goals and metrics laid out in NOMA NW’s Call-to-Action. It is the second edition of the Culture Change in Practice program. 

The architectural profession is still predominantly white and predominantly male. Of the AIA Seattle’s over 2,600 members, just 27 are Black or African American, and 3 are Indigenous American, while only 32% are women or nonbinary according to AIA members’ self-reported data. Creating culture change within architecture firms is a critical step to creating a more diverse and equitable profession. And through this professional change, AIA Seattle hopes to influence broader cultural change, due to the unique role of architects in crafting our physical environment. 

This program builds off AIA Seattle’s Intercultural Leadership Program and Conversations Toward A More Equitable Practice series in 2019, and is part of our Racial Justice Commitments. It serves as part of an ongoing response to racist violence, inequitable firm culture, and a segregated built environment, with a lens on architecture’s specific role in creating equity both within the profession and in the projects we carry out. It is created in partnership with NOMA NW, and Planning in Color. 


TARGET PARTICIPANTS – FIRM LEADERS

We invite a dedicated cohort of 40 firm leaders who have committed to, or are considering, the NOMA NW Call-to-Action Pledge. This peer-to-peer learning cohort, facilitated by Dr. Anu Taranath, will support firms’ ability to live up to the goals of the pledge and equip leaders to catalyze change outward in their own firms. 

  • (40) Firm Leaders: lead firms, lead practice groups, lead teams, are direct supervisors, make key decisions and have significant influence and power in shaping the culture and staffing of the firm or projects i.e Principals, Partners, Owners – with the intent of facilitating broader impact within their firms and industry 

Space is limited to 40 total registrants. Firms are encouraged to sign up to two (2) participants for this cohort. 

In response to requests from BIPOC participants in our first cohort, we are also asking participants to opt-in at registration to the White Male, White Female/nonbinary, or BIPOC affinity group. Each of these three groups will have one, shorter lunchtime gathering at a time TBC, convened by our facilitator to provide safe(r) space for discussions, alongside the four, cohort-wide learning sessions. 


FULL SERIES COST 

PLEASE NOTE: Each registration confirms a spot for one individual based on the size of their firm. Up to two (2) individuals per firm may participate in the program. 

$500 (per person)  1-7 Employees (firm size)
$1000 (per person)  8-49 Employees (firm size)
$1500 (per person)  50+ Employees (firm size)
$1500 (per person)  CAP Sponsors

**DEADLINE EXTENDED** 

In order to implement feedback from past cohort members and our planning team, and to allow time for ongoing conversations with prospective registrants, we have delayed the March session of the Culture Change in Practice cohort, and extended the registration deadline to Monday, May 16. A new session date has been added on Monday, December 5; all other dates remain the same. 

Registration includes all four courses in the series. Individual course registration is not available. All registration questions can be directed to Andrea Aguilera 

In recognition that this fee may present a hardship to some firms who are nevertheless committed to investing in the work, limited reduced rate options are available on a first come, first serve basis (priority given to AIA members). Please submit the Scholarship / Reduced Rate Request Form via email by Monday, May 9, 5:00pm PT.   

While we are striving to prevent or minimize the labor that BIPOC firm leaders are often asked to carry out in equity-related conversations, we recognize that our world’s power dynamics may unintentionally arise in this space. With that in mind, we encourage BIPOC and other marginalized participants to submit a Scholarship/Reduced Rate Request Form with their participation.  


COMMITMENT + SCHEDULE

Series registrants commit to participate in all four courses, understanding that the content will be designed sequentially for cohort-based learning. Program dates subject to change with notice to all registrants.

Session 1 | Monday, March 28, May, 23*, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

*We have delayed the March session of the Culture Change in Practice cohort, to occur Monday, May 23.

Session 2 | Monday, August 29, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

Session 3 | Monday, October 3, 9:00am-12:00pm PT

Session 4 | Monday, December 5, 9:00am-12:00pm PT

In order to implement feedback from past cohort members and our planning team, and to allow time for ongoing conversations with prospective registrants, we have delayed the March session of the Culture Change in Practice cohort, and added a new session date: Monday, December 5. All other dates remain the same. 

Click here for attendee resources

As noted above, participants who opt-in to the affinity groups will be invited to one, additional lunchtime gathering at three respective dates, to be confirmed. 

Guiding questions and readings will be sent to participants prior to, and following, each session. 


MEET THE FACILITATOR

Dr. Anu Taranath, Dr. Anu Consulting: dialogues for justice | Dr. Anu Taranath brings both passion and expertise to her work as a speaker, facilitator, author and educator. A University of Washington professor for the past 20 years, she teaches about race, gender, equity, and global literatures. As a DEI and racial equity consultant, she offers coaching, training, facilitation and other types of partnerships. Her book Beyond Guilt Trips: Mindful Travel in an Unequal World was named a Finalist for four book awards including the Washington State Book Award. Included in Fodor’s Travel’s “13 Books to Inspire Your Travels” and Oprah Magazine’s “Best 26 Travel Books of All Times,” Dr. Anu and her book have been profiled in YES!, AFAR, Bitch, Mindful and National Geographic magazines. Please visit www.anutaranath.com for more on Dr. Anu and her work.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PLANNING TEAM

Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA, Diversity Roundtable/AIA Board of Directors/GGLO | Susan Frieson AIA, Diversity Roundtable/NOMA NW/Weber Thompson | Mark Chubb Assoc. AIA, Code Unlimited | Mathew Albores AIA, The Miller Hull Partnership | Genevieve MacNeil Assoc. AIA, Diversity Roundtable/Gensler | Kristen Riley Assoc. AIA, LMN Architects | Stephanie Velasco, Planning in Color | Meredith Everist AIA, AIA Board of Directors/Baylis Architect | Jennie C. Li, Planning in Color | Simba Mafundikwa Assoc. AIA, NOMA NW/AIA Membership Steering Committee/GGLO | Marijana Misic AIA, AIA Board of Directors/Mahlum | Patreese Martin AIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson | Leon Holloway AIA, Professional Practice Steering Committee/NOMA NW/DLR Group | Veronica Barrow Assoc. AIA, NOMA NW/Veronica Barrow Design 


PARTICIPATING FIRMS

Olson Kundig | Weber Thompson | The Miller Hull Partnership | Nakano Associates | Dykeman | SHKS Architects
+ many more


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Connor Descheemaker, Member Engagement Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Kristen Lound, Associate Director of Growth & Operations at AIA Seattle

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – February 2022

NATIONAL NEWS

National Building Performance Standard Effort
At the United States Conference of Mayors winter meeting in January, President Biden announced a new partnership with state and local governments to reduce carbon emissions from the built environment. Known as the Building Performance Standards Coalition, participating jurisdictions include the states of Washington and Colorado and 31 cities, including Seattle. This partnership will support Seattle and state efforts to equitably transition our buildings off fossil fuels to a clean energy future and energize policy innovation. We’re currently working with Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment and the Washington Dept. of Commerce to determine how architects can participate in this effort.


STATE NEWS

State Building Code Council – 2021 Commercial Energy Code
The 2021 commercial energy code amendments will be voted on by State Building Code Council members on April 22. You can view the proposed rule here. Written comments may be submitted through March 11. The SBCC will also have public hearings on the amendments on Feb. 25 and March 11 – signups are being accepted for verbal (remote) testimony at the Feb. 25 meeting, with overflow expected at the March 11 meeting. AIA is paying close attention to new requirements for the use of efficient electric heat pumps for space and water heating in new commercial and large multifamily buildings. We encourage architects and firms who support these amendments to weigh in with the Council in one of the following ways:

  • Submit written comments by March 11 to sbcc@des.wa.gov;
  • Provide verbal comments to the SBCC at its Feb. 25 meeting (contact Kirsten for more info); or
  • Sign on to a building industry letter in support of the heat pump provisions (as an individual or a firm)

AIA|WA Energy code info session: Kjell Anderson AIA, the architects’ representative to the SBCC, will hold an info session on the proposals that are up for consideration TODAY, Feb. 17, at 2pm. More info here.

State Legislative Session Update
Tuesday was the cutoff date for all bills to have passed out of their house of origin and move on to the second house. Those that failed to pass are dead. Here is a review of key AIA bills that remain alive and will be considered in their second house:

Climate

  • HB 1770 – Requires the State Building Code Council to develop a residential energy reach code that local governments can opt to use instead of baseline state code; also includes net zero ready requirements.
  • SB 5722 – Extends building performance requirements to smaller buildings.
  • HB 1280 – Requires an analysis of the use of all-electrific systems as part of the pre-design work for large state buildings.
  • HB 1099 – Adds a climate element to the state’s Growth Management Act requirements.

ACT NOW: If your senator is a member of the Senate Environment Committee (check here), please consider emailing them to ask for support on HB 1770 and HB 1280. We expect them to vote on both bills in committee early next week. Contact Kirsten if you need help with messaging or the email address.

Housing

  • HB 1882 – Creates a housing benefit district pilot program to plan and fund land acquisition for affordable housing near major transit stops (this bill did not pass its house of origin but it has an exemption because it impacts the budget).
  • HB 1660 – Eliminates local restrictions related to ADUs, including owner occupancy requirements and some parking requirements.
  • SB 5818 – Limits SEPA and GMA appeals related to affordable housing projects.

Note: HB 1782 on missing middle housing was eligible for a vote on the House floor, albeit in very reduced form, but Democratic leadership did not allow a vote. This almost always means that the bill did not have the votes to pass. This bill is dead for this year, but it will be back in some form next year. In the meantime, AIA will work with legislators to provide the kind of envisioning of missing middle housing that AIA Seattle’s Comp Plan Work Group will be working on, as well as ideas on how housing projects can move through local review more quickly (without eliminating local review – which was the subject of two bills this year) 

Practice
HB 1592 – Provides for provisional licenses for military spouses with a license from another state, but allows licensing authorities to determine whether the qualifications are equal to Washington’s.

For questions about any of these bills or other legislation under consideration, contact Kirsten.

How you can participate

  • You can contact your three legislators at any time about legislation or a policy issue. You can find their emails here. If you need to look up who your legislators are, you can do so with your home address here.
  • You can register your position on bills, sign up to testify at a committee hearing, or offer written comments on a bill. Contact Kirsten for help.

 Thank you to the AIA Seattle members who have testified “in” Olympia since our last report!

  • Christopher Patano AIA | EHDD | SB 5722 – building performance standard extension
  • Duane Jonlin FAIA | City of Seattle | HB 1770 – energy codes
  • Chris Hellstern AIA | The Miller Hull Partnership | HB 1770 – energy codes

LOCAL NEWS

Seattle Land Use Omnibus
SDCI has drafted new land use omnibus legislation to fix smaller issues with the land use code. The legislation is currently in the SEPA appeal process and will then be transmitted to the City Council. AIA is asking members to review the provisions and let us know if you have concerns or suggested edits. For more info or to submit comments, go to AIA’s worksheet or contact Kirsten.


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Planning Commission Vacancy
The Seattle Planning Commission is looking for a new member to help advise the Mayor’s Office and City Council about planning and development related decisions. Candidates must be current residents of Seattle and be able to attend three meetings per month, with additional time out of meetings to attend events or review materials as needed. Additional info from the Commission:

Ideal candidates add diverse experience to the Commission, and can bring to light issues facing all parts of the city as a result of their professional and lived experiences. We look for applicants who have a combination of the following characteristics:

  • Bring a commitment to making Seattle a great place to live and have interest in, knowledge of, or professional experience in land use, zoning, or other aspects of planning.
  • Have a strong understanding of racial equity, and the impacts of racialized policies and practices in the field of planning.
  • Have a commitment to community-building and community engagement.
  • Understand transportation investments and how they impact the neighborhoods around them.
  • Can speak to the needs of affordable housing and/or understand what role affordability plays in the city.
  • Have a passion for communicating planning topics to a diverse audience.

Please contact Planning Commission staff for more information about applying.

Washington Board for Architects Position Open
The Washington State Board for Architects will have a Board Member position available starting in June 2022. The seven-member, governor-appointed board is made up of one member of the public and six registered architects who reside in Washington and have at least eight years’ experience in responsible charge of architectural work. The Board’s primary function is to protect the public’s health, safety, and welfare through regulating the practice of architecture. Board member responsibilities include:

  • Attending board meetings (approx. four a year)
  • Participating in board committees for specific projects
  • Acting as a case manager or as part of the judicial panel in disciplinary cases
  • Representing the board responsibly to the profession and the public
  • Attending national council meetings as needed
  • Reviewing applications as needed

More information about this position is available here. Applications can be found here, and should be submitted by April 15.


EVENTS/WORK GROUPS

AIA’s 2022 Policy Projects: Comprehensive Plan & Design Review    
In 2022 we’ll be working on two major public policy efforts: the Seattle Comprehensive Plan and ongoing work to make Seattle’s Design Review process more effective for everyone. We’d like your input and participation! Specific opportunities are below, but please reach out to Kirsten if you have comments at any time.

Comprehensive Plan
Seattle’s update of its Major Comprehensive Plan (2022-24) is arguably one of the most critical points in the city’s history. Required by the state to plan for how the city will accommodate growth over the next two decades, the Comp Plan will address crucial questions around how we distribute opportunity, what our neighborhoods should look like, and what changes we need to make to create a more sustainable and resilient city. You can be part of this effort by joining our Comp Plan Work Group, which meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday of the month from 12-1pm. Or, you can sign up to receive updates about our efforts so that you can plug in wherever you like. Contact Kirsten for more info.

Design Review
We’re looking for architects’ feedback on Seattle’s Design Review process and how it might be improved to achieve the design and community objectives it was intended to accomplish. Join us for AIA’s Design Review Work Session on Friday, March 4, 1-2pm. Member and non-member architects, designers, and associates welcome.


We would love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy + Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-708-3199 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Black History Month – 2022

Celebrating Black History Month graphic

At AIA Seattle we share this vision and celebrate the contributions of Black architects and designers to our profession. We are committed to a process of transparency in what measurable actions we are taking in pursuit of racial justice. We have established an evolving list for the sake of mutual accountability in our member-led organization. Read the full evolving list of Racial Justice commitments here.

 

Chapter Updates

This past year encouraged each of us to find new ways to grow, adapt, and challenge the world around us. In 2021, the JE:DI Council worked in support of the Chapter’s ongoing EDI work, naming and confronting systemic discrimination within the AEC professions. Currently, this group is evaluating the impact of the policies that guide our Chapter, with the goal of proposing recommendations to provide greater access and foster a culture of inclusion and fairness. This group meets twice a month, with lunchtime listening sessions planned on the second Tuesday of each month. Connect with the JE:DI Council chairs to learn more about how to get engaged.

As a corollary to our 2019 Intercultural Leadership Program and 2021 Culture Change in Practice leadership cohort, AIA Seattle is continuing its partnership with NOMA NW and Planning in Color to convene its second architecture and allied firm leadership cohort for 2022. Through peer-based learning, this group will develop and share with one another best practices to meet the objectives laid out in the NOMA NW Call-to-Action. This year’s series registration launches next week!

Congrats to Alison Pride AIA who received the Black Engineer of the Year Award!

 

Diversity Roundtable Committee Updates

Diversity by Design: Equity in Architecture, the latest exhibit @ the Center, showcases 7 Northwest Regional projects submitted to Diversity Roundtable’s open call to celebrate the work of underrepresented designers. This show, which complements the Diversity by Design website, offers an opportunity for underrepresented architects to showcase their work and highlights the experience and impact community involvement has on the architect of color, the design of the building, and the community in which the building resides.

While the “Architects in Schools” program is still on pause, Diversity Roundtable (DRT) has been working with the Wild Students in collaboration with Sawhorse Revolution, virtually mentoring high school students about the design and build process. In 2021, together they transformed the design of the Garden Shed for Danny Woo Gardens.

Join Diversity RoundtableDRT attracts, retains, and empowers individuals of underrepresented backgrounds in the profession of architecture through scholarship, community service, and activism. DRT meets (virtually until further notice) the first Tuesday of every month at 5 pm.

 

NOMA Updates

NOMA National‘s Prescott Reavis, with help from Rachel Bascombe, curated a month of Black history in architecture spotlights, Looking Black on Instagram. We offer our condolences to the NOMA community and the family and friends of Prescott Reavis, who passed away earlier this week.

NOMA partners with Black Spectacles to ease the licensure process for minority architects.

 

Extended Community Events and Resources

The 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival explores Black Health and Wellness. Black Bodies: From Exploitation to Excellence, kicks off tomorrow, featuring panel discussions exploring historic exploitation of Black bodies for the advancement of scientific and medical discovery. See the full schedule and purchase tickets now!

Fireclay Tile and the Architecture Foundation have sponsored a Diversity Advancement Scholarship to support Black Women in Architecture. More information here.

Learn about Black history in five minutes a day with 28 Days of Black History. Curated by Black artists, educators, curators, and visionaries, this interactive series will center on stories of Black marginalized voices that are often overlooked in Black history narratives.

Hip Hop Architecture Camp positions Hip Hop culture as a catalyst to introduce underrepresented youth to architecture, urban planning, and design. It is a one-week intensive experience, designed to introduce underrepresented youth to architecture, urban planning, creative placemaking, and economic development through the lens of hip hop culture. Volunteer or host a camp with them now!

#EQxD2022 – The JE:DI Agenda in Action Series is an augmented series of panels and workshops that proposes a new paradigm for designing a just future in which the built environment cultivates dignity, belonging, agency and mutualism.

The AIA Guides for Equitable Practice are a resource to help ensure organizations meet professional and cultural awareness expectations of employees and clients.

 

Articles of note:

 

Have another event or resource we should share? Tell us about it here.

Posted in Diversity Roundtable, For the Profession, For the Public, Missions, Visions, Values

Seattle Comprehensive Plan: AIA Work Group

Seattle’s update of its Major Comprehensive Plan (2022-24) is arguably one of the most critical points in the city’s history. Required by the state to plan for how the city will accommodate growth over the next two decades, the Comp Plan will address crucial questions around how we distribute opportunity, what our neighborhoods should look like, and what changes we need to make to create a more sustainable and resilient city.

We need interested members to help AIA creatively respond to the questions inherent in this process.

  • How can we harness architects’ skills and experience to inform questions and ideas about how Seattle will grow?
  • How can we engage the public in design thinking around housing, complete neighborhoods, access, and more?
  • And how can we use our understanding of land use code to promote equitable opportunity and prevent displacement?

We’re looking to tackle these questions and more as we engage in discussion, design experimentation, and deep thinking about Seattle’s future.

You can be part of this effort by joining our Comp Plan Work Group, which kicks off in February. Or, you can sign up to receive updates about our efforts so that you can plug in wherever you like. Options for participating are below and will grow exponentially over time; contact Kirsten for more information.

Comp Plan Work Group
Meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday, 12-1 pm
Email Kirsten for the calendar invites

Comp Plan email sign up
Email Kirsten to be added to our list for email updates on our work on the Comp Plan and related programming.

Posted in Advocacy Tagged with:

Advocacy Update – January 2022

STATE NEWS

State Building Code Council Releases 2021 Commercial Energy Code
The 2021 commercial energy code amendments have been released by the State Building Code Council; you can view the proposed rule here. Public comments can be emailed to sbcc@des.wa.gov through March 11. The SBCC will also have public hearings on the amendments on Feb. 25 and March 11. AIA is paying close attention to new requirements for the use of efficient electric heat pumps for space and water heating in new commercial and large multifamily buildings. We encourage architects and firms who support these amendments to weigh in with the Council in one of the following ways:

  • Submit email comments by March 11 – we’ll send more info on this soon
  • Provide comments to the SBCC at its Feb. 25 or March 11 meetings (more info coming)
  • Sign on to a building industry letter in support of the heat pump provisions (as an individual or a firm)
  • Share this letter with others in the AEC industry!

State Legislative Session Update
The state legislative session kicked off last week and things are already moving quickly. Look to AIA|WA for a full recap. Here is a review of key AIA bills that have been heard in committee during the first two weeks of session:

Climate

  • HB 1770/SB 5669 – Requires the State Building Code Council to develop a residential energy reach code that local governments can choose to adopt instead of baseline state code.
  • SB 5722/HB 1774 – Extends the state’s building performance standard to smaller buildings.
  • *HB 1280 – Requires an analysis of the use of all-electrification systems as part of the pre-design work for large state buildings.
  • *HB 1099 – Adds a climate element to the state’s Growth Management Act requirements.

Housing

  • HB 1782/SB 5670 – Requires additional middle housing near transit and in areas traditionally dedicated to single-family detached housing.
  • HB 1880 – Creates a housing benefit districts pilot program to plan and fund land acquisition for affordable housing near major transit stops.
  • ADU legislation: HB 1660 (prohibits owner occupancy requirements); HB 1337 (local gov’t requirements related to ADUs); HB 1711 (incentives for building ADUs).
  • SB 5818 – Limits SEPA and GMA appeals related to affordable housing projects

Practice

  • HB 1592 – Provides for temporary licenses for military spouses

*These bills passed the House last year but must pass the House again to move on. They are both awaiting a vote on the House floor. All other bills are new (or have a new version) in 2022 and were heard in committee in the last two weeks. The next step is to be voted on in committee.

For questions about any of these bills or other legislation under consideration, contact Kirsten.

How you can participate

  • You can contact your three legislators at any time about legislation or a policy issue. You can find their emails here (click on the link under “Rosters”). If you need to look up who your legislators are, you can do so with your home address here.
  • You can register your position on bills, sign up to testify at a committee hearing, or offer written comments on a bill. Contact Kirsten for help.

Thank you to the AIA Seattle members who have testified “in” Olympia thus far this session!

  • Christopher Patano AIA – building performance standard
  • Sadie Carlson Assoc. AIA – targeted electrification
  • Matt Hutchins AIA – missing middle housing
  • Duane Jonlin FAIA – energy codes
  • Grace Kim FAIA – housing benefit districts

LOCAL NEWS

AIA’s 2022 Policy Projects: Comprehensive Plan & Design Review
In 2022 we’ll be working on two major public policy efforts: the Seattle Comprehensive Plan and ongoing work to make Seattle’s Design Review process more effective for everyone. We’d like your input and participation! Specific opportunities are below, but please reach out to Kirsten if you have comments at any time.

Comprehensive Plan
Seattle’s update of its Major Comprehensive Plan (2022-24) is arguably one of the most critical points in the city’s history. Required by the state to plan for how the city will accommodate growth over the next two decades, the Comp Plan will address crucial questions around how we distribute opportunity, what our neighborhoods should look like, and what changes we need to make to create a more sustainable and resilient city.

We need interested members to help AIA creatively respond to the questions inherent in this process. How can we harness architects’ skills and experience to inform questions and ideas about how Seattle will grow? How can we engage the public in design thinking around housing, complete neighborhoods, access, and more? And how can we use our understanding of land use code to promote equitable opportunity and prevent displacement? We’re looking to tackle these questions and more as we engage in discussion, design experimentation, and deep thinking about Seattle’s future.

You can be part of this effort by joining our Comp Plan Work Group, which kicks off in February. Or, you can sign up to receive updates about our efforts so that you can plug in wherever you like. If you’d like to receive info on the Work Group, or just be added to our email distribution list, you can sign up here.

Design Review
We’re looking for architects’ feedback on Seattle’s Design Review process and how it might be improved to achieve the design and community objectives it was intended to accomplish.

We’ll be organizing a session in February for architects and designers to discuss Design Review, including what’s working and what’s not; what changes you would like to see; and what you would like Design Review to achieve – as applicants, board members, and community participants.  We’ll also distribute a survey for architects and designers who prefer to participate in writing. We don’t have a date yet, but we’d love to know if you’re interested. You can add your name to our list here and we’ll send you more info soon. Non-member architects are welcome.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-708-3199 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Register Now for our Upcoming Road to Code Seminars

Join us for five upcoming sessions to learn from Code experts. 

Session 1 | Road to Code | Code Requirements for Doors and Hardware
February 17, 2022 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM // Class Credit: 2 LU/HSW

Session 2 | Road to Code | Beyond the IBC- Expanding Knowledge Across the Code Family
April 19-20, 2022 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM // Class Credit:  4 LU/HSW

Session 2 | Road to Code | TBD
September 21-22, 2022 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM //Class Credit: TBD

Session 4 |  Session TBC
November 15-16, 2022 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM //Class Credit: TBD

All session dates and times subject to change.


Special Thanks to our 2022 Code Series Sponsors

Allana Buick & Bers | Beacon | Code Unlimited | McKinstryProsoco | Woodworks

Degenkolb Engineers | Puget Sound Energy | Windows, Doors, & More 


Code Committee

Special thanks to the Code Committee for planning this series of sessions!

COMMITTEE CHAIRS:

Skye Bredberg, AIA

Mark Chubb, AIA


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Connor Descheemaker, Member Engagement Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Kristen Lound, Associate Director, Growth & Operations at AIA Seattle

Posted in Code, For the Profession, For the Public, Uncategorized

2021 Year in Review

AIA Seattle will be closed December 24 through January 3

Dear AIA Seattle Community,

Thank you for the warm welcome to lead AIA Seattle’s mission to champion the central role of architects in creating and sustaining a better built environment. It’s a pleasure to share with you a reflection on our work in 2021 and our plans for 2022. We’ve come a long way in the past year through the availability of vaccines and evolving understanding of COVID 19. 2022 holds the promise of continuing impactful programs and our work to move forward our vision of design that fosters equitable, resilient, and thriving communities.

In 2021, disruptions transformed into opportunities as we adjusted how we provide programs for our members and the community. Over the past year, AIA Seattle has maintained focus on the core elements of our strategic plan, to prepare our profession to lead, to deploy design to make a difference, and to sustain a healthy chapter. We move forward in service to the membership in ten counties which we serve.

We are launching into 2022 with a steady focus on three areas of highest priority for advocacy, engagement, and programming: 

  • Housing
  • Climate
  • Justice and Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

We will continue to engage as problems solvers in an evolving environment, and have plans for 2022 to provide education for our members through a broad range of programming including everything from the Small Firm Series to the Climate Leadership Summit. Advocacy plans include hosting sessions for members of the public and profession to learn how they can engage in the City of Seattle’s Comprehensive Plan process, perhaps the most urgent and valuable step forward the city we want to become. In fall we plan to gather together for the Honor Awards, as an opportunity to share and celebrate nationally recognized excellence in design by architects in Washington State.

In 2022, I am personally looking forward to continuing to develop my understanding of your interests and relationships with you as a stakeholder. Your first opportunity to express your interests is below in our brief Programming Feedback Survey, and in early 2022, I’m also hosting ‘Ask Me Anything‘ Sessions in a virtual format. I encourage you to consider what questions you have for me as AIA Seattle’s Executive Director. Submit your questions here and we will group those by theme and announce dates early in the year for interactive zoom sessions.

Thank you for your engagement, and I look forward to our future connections in 2022!

Melissa Neher Executive Director Headshot

Melissa K. Neher
Executive Director, AIA Seattle + Seattle Design Festival

A Look Back – 2021 Events and Programs

So many great programs were delivered in 2021. Highlights include:

Stay tuned for 2022’s lineup of educational programming and events. First up – the Diversity by Design exhibit – online and at the Center (by appointment) January 19 – July 14.


The Staff of AIA Seattle Welcomed Five New Members to the Team in 2021:

  • Melissa K. Neher, Executive Director
  • Anthony Collins, Membership & Development Coordinator
  • David Le, Communications Coordinator
  • Andrea Aguilera, Programs Coordinator
  • Mitch Britton, Graphic Designer

From all of us at AIA Seattle, we wish you the best for your holiday season and look forward to seeing you all again in 2022!

Note on Holiday Hours: AIA Seattle + Seattle Design Festival will be closed December 24, 2021, through January 3, 2022, for Winter Break.

Posted in For the Profession, Home Page

Advocacy Update – December 2021

STATE NEWS

Washington’s Redistricting Process Ends
Washington’s redistricting saga has ended, with the state Supreme Court declining to develop its own district maps and allowing the maps approved after the deadline by the state’s redistricting commission to take effect. You may view the final Congressional and state legislative district maps here. While redistricting bodies generally try to avoid kicking a sitting legislator out of her own district (by drawing the boundaries outside her home address), there are always some casualties. The new maps draw seven legislators out of their districts, although three were already planning to leave office. The remaining four are: Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D-Seattle); Rep. Shelley Kloba (D-Kirkland); Rep. Jeremie Dufault (R-Selah), and Rep. Vicki Kraft (R-Vancouver). For the 2022 elections, these legislators will have to do one of three things: move into their old district boundaries; run against a sitting incumbent in their new district; or choose not to run again.

Washington’s Legislative Session Kicks Off in January
The state legislative session begins on January 10, 2022 and will be virtual for the public again this year. The Senate will hold sessions in person for senators only while the House is expected to continue the hybrid model with some members in person and some participating virtually. Public testimony and member meetings with the public will continue to take place online, although face-to-face meetings with senators may be possible. Look for additional information on the session from AIA Washington Council in the weeks ahead. Note AIA|WA’s legislative-related events in the “Events” section below.


LOCAL NEWS

Seattle City Budget Finalized
Seattle’s budget wrapped up on Nov. 22 with councilmembers voting 8-1 to approve a $7.1 billion budget package that prioritizes affordable housing, homelessness, and responding to economic crises caused by the pandemic. Mayor Durkan signed the Council’s budget on Dec. 2. Spending highlights include:

  • $355 million for the Seattle Police Department including funds to hire 125 officers in 2022, a $7 million decrease from last year and a $9.9 million reduction from Durkan’s proposed budget;
  • A $194 million investment in affordable housing, including $97 million funded by revenue from the council’s JumpStart payroll tax;
  • Authorization of up to $100 million in bonds to repair bridges around the city;
  • $16.4 million for Green New Deal and climate resilience investments;
  • $15.4 million in new funding for homelessness services under the new Regional Homelessness Authority;
  • Over $10 million for tiny house village short-term housing solutions;
  • $5 million to help create a high acuity shelter with community and county partners to help stabilize unsheltered people experiencing health crises;
  • $2.5 million to expand mobile mental and behavioral health crisis services;
  • A $3.9 million increase for the city’s LEAD post-arrest/pre-booking diversion program; and
  • $1.5 million in Vehicle Residency Outreach and Safe Lots for people living in vehicles;

Source: Seattle Times

AIA supported a successful amendment by Councilmember Dan Strauss to require the Seattle Dept. of Construction & Inspections to report on Design Review-related program outcomes, process improvements, and equity outcomes in 2022.

Seattle Commercial Energy Code Amendment Passes
On Dec. 13, the City Council passed legislation to amend the 2018 Seattle Energy Code adopted Feb. 1, 2021. As originally adopted, the 2018 Seattle Energy Code requires that central water heating in multi-family and hotel uses be performed by heat pump water heaters (HPWH) rather than gas or electric resistance water heaters. Commercial buildings were exempted from this requirement, allowing them to continue to use systems that rely on fossil fuels. The new legislation extends the HPWH requirement to include new commercial buildings that incorporate more than minimal water heating capacity for permits applied for after April 1, 2022. There are several exceptions, most notably that this requirement does not apply to replacement of water heaters in existing commercial buildings. The legislation also includes several technical changes to make the code provisions more coordinated and enforceable. More info here.

Seattle City Council Passes Resolution on URM Buildings
Also this week, the Seattle City Council passed a resolution declaring the city’s intent to ensure that all unreinforced masonry buildings in Seattle are seismically retrofitted. Per the bill summary: “This resolution represents the joint commitment by the Mayor and City Council to work on establishing a URM retrofit program, with a work plan that will be led by the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections and the Office of Emergency Management.” Read the full text here.

Shoreline Updates its Commercial Energy Code
In early December the Shoreline City Council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance that eliminates most uses of fossil fuels for space heating and hot water in newly constructed commercial buildings and multifamily buildings four stories or taller. With the vote, Shoreline became the second city in the Pacific Northwest, after Seattle, to adopt a policy that aids in accelerating the transition to all-electric buildings by eliminating most fossil fuel uses from new commercial and large multi-family development.

Bellingham Considers Stronger Commercial Energy Code
Bellingham’s City Council held a public hearing on Dec 13 to consider an advanced commercial energy code, modeled after Seattle’s. Council will continue consideration early in 2022. Highlights include:

  • Restrictions on heating systems to exclude fossil fuel and electric resistance;
  • Exclusion of fossil fuel and electric resistance central water heating systems; and
  • Increased on-site renewable energy requirements.

Snohomish County Approves C-PACER
This week the Snohomish County Council voted to approve a C-PACER ordinance that will bring low-cost, long-term financing to support energy efficiency and resiliency projects in commercial (including agricultural and industrial) and multi-family buildings of five stories or more. As we have previously reported, C-PACER programs have also been authorized in Thurston, Whatcom, Clark, and most recently King counties. The Snohomish County ordinance authorizes staff to work on developing a program over the next year.


OPPORTUNITIES

Job Opportunity: Policy Researcher, Carbon Leadership Forum at UW
The Carbon Leadership Forum, a research organization based out of the University of Washington’s College of Built Environments, is seeking a collaborative Policy Researcher to help execute its mission to accelerate the decarbonization of the building sector through eliminating the embodied carbon in building materials and construction. More info.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Housing Task Force
The Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon. All are welcome. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

AIA Washington Council Pre-Legislative Session Events
AIA|WA is hosting three webinars (with CE credit) the week before the state legislative session begins in January:

AIA Washington Council Capitol Connections
Capitol Connections is AIA|WA’s annual lobby event in Olympia, where architects discuss issues important to the profession directly with their legislators. It’s a great opportunity to learn about architect advocacy and the state government process! All meetings in 2022 will be virtual. Learn more here.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Recipient Announced for 2021 Northwest Washington Section Scholarship

2021-22 Recipient:
My name is Ciera Gordon. After graduating from Burlington-Edison High School, I studied architecture and mechanical engineering with a minor in energy studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I am currently in the final year of the Master of Architecture program at the University of California, Berkeley and will be graduating in 2022.

As I continue my graduate education and prepare to enter into professional practice, I would like to further advance my design skills, delve into the practicalities of materials, construction, and structure, and develop my interests in energy efficiency in the built environment. I am particularly interested in the potential for increased energy efficiency through passive thermal strategies in buildings, building on my second undergraduate major in mechanical engineering and minor in energy studies. I hope to carry this interdisciplinary background into my future work to allow me to approach architectural design from varied perspectives and make informed technical decisions both as a graduate student and professionally. 

About the Northwest Washington Section Scholarship Fund
The goal of the AIA Northwest Washington Section Scholarship is to encourage and assist local residents of Whatcom, Skagit, Island and San Juan Counties who are pursuing a degree in architecture in an accredited School of Architecture. Entering its 9th year, the scholarship fund is primarily funded by funds raised at the annual Scholarship Golf Tournament. Despite the cancellation of the 2020 tournament, the Section remains committed to funding the program throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to help students in the region.

About the Northwest Washington Section of American Institute of Architects Seattle Chapter
AIA Northwest Washington is a section of AIA Seattle that provides events and programs for AIA members in Skagit, Whatcom, Island and San Juan counties.

About the Seattle Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1894, AIA Seattle is a not-for-profit professional association of architects, allied professionals, and laypeople. AIA Seattle provides the architecture community with resources and relationships to make a difference through design. unrestricted scholarship support through the Northwest Washington Section’s annual support fund.

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington, Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – November 2021

STATE NEWS

Washington Redistricting
Washington’s redistricting commission, charged with determining new state and Congressional legislative districts after the 2020 census, failed to meet its Nov. 15 deadline to agree on new district maps. The failure of the panel, made up of two Republicans and two Democrats, means the state’s election maps for the next decade will be determined by the state Supreme Court. At least three of the four commission members are required to agree before maps can be finalized. The Supreme Court now has until April 30 to draw its own maps. This is the first time since Washington adopted a constitutional amendment creating the redistricting commission in 1990 that the commission has failed to produce final maps on time.

State Legislative Session Kicks Off in January
The state legislative session begins on January 10, 2022, and will be virtual for the public again this year. The Senate will hold sessions in person for senators only while the House is expected to continue the hybrid model with some members in person and some participating virtually. Public testimony and member meetings with the public will continue to take place online. Look for additional information on the session from AIA Washington Council in the weeks ahead. And note the legislative preview events under “Events” below.


LOCAL NEWS

King County Council Passes C-PACER Ordinance
This week the King County Council unanimously adopted a C-PACER ordinance that will bring low-cost, long-term financing to support energy efficiency and resiliency projects in commercial and multi-family buildings. C-PACER, Commercial-Property Assessed Clean Energy & Resilience, provides private loans that can be used by building owners to finance deep energy and resilience-related retrofits. Importantly, these loans are treated as liens by the county, so they do not show up on an owner’s books and they stay with the building when sold, not the owner. This allows owners to make long-term investments in their buildings even if they do not plan to maintain ownership over the long term.

AIA helped to pass state legislation to authorize C-PACER financing in Washington, but each county must authorize its own C-PACER program. These loans will support the county’s climate goals and allow larger commercial building owners to make improvements required by the state’s Clean Buildings program. To date, C-PACER programs have also been authorized in Thurston, Whatcom, and Clark counties.

Seattle Announces New Building, Transportation, and Workforce Climate Actions
As part of the COP26 climate summit, Mayor Durkan announced a new Executive Order directing Seattle departments to implement new actions toward net-zero emission buildings, healthy and equitable transportation, and clean energy workforce development. The executive order will do the following:

  Building sector

  • Direct the Office of Sustainability & Environment to create legislation for carbon-based building performance standards for existing commercial and multi-family buildings 20,000 sq ft or larger in 2022 (the state’s building performance standard applies to buildings 50,000 sq ft or higher). AIA will be meeting with OSE staff in December to help flesh out this program.
  • Prohibit fossil fuels in city-owned buildings by 2035.
  • Provide options to lower upfront and operating costs for affordable housing.

  Transportation sector

  • Expand free transit for Seattle Public Schools middle and high school students with additional ORCA cards for middle school students.
  • Expand Seattle’s Stay Healthy Streets to establish the first urban pedestrian zone. Potential sites will be identified by December 31, 2021, for implementation in summer 2022.
  • Take legislative and permitting action to incentivize transportation electrification.
  • Launch a $1 million pilot to convert heavy-duty diesel trucks operating in the Duwamish Valley to electric.

Just transition

  • Launch a clean energy workforce committee to advance the economic equity goals of Seattle’s Green New Deal in alignment with the Green New Deal Oversight Board.
  • Deploy new 2022 clean energy workforce investments and identify capacity and funding needs and regional partnerships to prepare, connect, and diversify workers in the growing clean energy sectors.

OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Seattle Launches Comp Plan Programming in January
Seattle’s upcoming update of its Major Comprehensive Plan (2022-24) is arguably one of the most critical points in the city’s history. Required by the state to plan for how the city will accommodate growth over the next two decades, the Comprehensive Plan will address crucial questions around how we distribute opportunity, what our neighborhoods should look like, and what changes we need to make to create a more sustainable and resilient city.

AIA Seattle will participate in this process in two ways:

  1. As a group of citizens working to identify our collective priorities around growth, housing, and more and providing this feedback to the city.
  2. As an interpreter, educator, and resource for our members and the public to equip them with the tools they need to participate in the process.

We will use our skills and creativity as architects, design thinkers, and urban planners to educate our members and the public on the big ideas that are driving Seattle’s civic conversation about its future while providing opportunities to discover and debate key questions and policy choices. AIA’s Public Policy Board and Housing Task Force will be leading this effort; if you’d like to join in the event planning, whether that’s one event or more, we’d love to have you! Please let Kirsten know.

Seattle Design Commission Seeks Architect
The Seattle Design Commission is looking for an architect to join the commission for a two-year term beginning in March. Members do NOT have to reside in Seattle. The Commission reviews city-funded capital projects and projects that seek long-term or permanent use of a right of way. Commissioners typically serve 15 hours a month in meetings that occur during the day. Commissioners receive a small stipend for their time. Materials must be submitted by Nov. 29. More information is available here.

Seattle’s Design Review Boards Looking for Members
Seattle is looking for qualified candidates to fill 14 upcoming openings on the city’s Design Review Boards. Board members evaluate the design of new buildings based on citywide and neighborhood-specific design guidelines. The boards review large mixed-use developments, multifamily housing, and commercial projects. The volunteer positions will start on April 4, 2022. Read more about the specific positions open on each board, as well as qualifications and expectations, here. Application materials must be received by Dec. 15.

Associates: AIA National Associates Committee
AIA Washington Council is seeking candidates to serve as Washington’s state representative to the AIA National Associates Committee (NAC) for a 2-year term. The NAC represents associates in both traditional and non-traditional paths by providing information and leadership to AIA components. The NAC representative will be involved in addressing local and national issues and will help to shape new policies. The appointed representative will also become an AIA|WA Board Associate and ex-officio member of the AIA|WA board of directors for the duration of their NAC term. Applications are due November 30, 2021.  More information, including qualifications and how to apply, is available here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Housing Task Force
The Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon. All are welcome. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

AIA Washington Council Pre-Legislative Session Events
AIA|WA is hosting three webinars the week before the state legislative session begins in January:


THANK YOU!

Thanks to AIA Seattle members who met with our reached out to elected officials in the last month!  Your advocacy makes a huge difference.

  • Carrie Anderson | Sen. Reuven Carlyle | building decarbonization
  • Geoff Anderson | Rep. Kirsten Harris-Talley | building decarbonization
  • Kjell Anderson | Sen. Reuven Carlyle | building decarbonization
  • Jed Ballew | Sen. Liz Lovelett, Rep. Debra Lekanoff, Rep. Sharon Shewmake | building decarbonization
  • Adam Bettcher | Sen. Derek Stanford & Rep. Davina Duerr | building decarbonization
  • Julie Blazek | Sen. Liz Lovelett, Rep. Debra Lekanoff, Rep. Sharon Shewmake | building decarbonization
  • Carl Dominguez | Sen. Reuven Carlyle | building decarbonization
  • Kristen Dotson | King County Councilmember Pete von Reichbauer | C-PACER
  • Mike Fowler | Sen. Christine Rolfes | building decarbonization
  • Anjali Grant | Rep Steve Bergquist & Rep David Hackney | building decarbonization
  • Bert Gregory | Sen. Reuven Carlyle | building decarbonization
  • Chris Hellstern | Sen. Reuven Carlyle, Rep. Liz Berry, Rep. Noel Frame | building decarbonization
  • Nancy Henderson | Rep. Kirsten Harris-Talley | building decarbonization
  • Doug Ito | Rep. Cindy Ryu | building decarbonization/housing; letter to City of Shoreline Council | commercial energy code
  • Annalee Shum | King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn | C-PACER
  • Pepe Valle | Sen. Derek Stanford | building decarbonization

We’re sorry if we missed you!


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

2021 Honor Award Winners

2021 Awards of Honor Fort Worden Building 305 and Loom House

SEATTLE, November 9, 2021 – The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Seattle hosted the 71st annual Honor Awards for Washington Architecture to celebrate excellence in design on November 9, 2021.

The distinguished jury included Katherine Darnstadt AIA, NOMA, LEED AP (Latent Design), Sharon Johnston FAIA (Johnston Marklee), and Helena Zambrano AIA, CPHC (Mahlum). Co-Chairs for the 2021 AIA Seattle Honor Awards were Ming-Lee Yuan AIA (Olson Kundig) and Catherine De Almeida, ASLA (UW Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Built Environments).

From 103 submittals, the jury chose 16 award winners from three categories – Built, Conceptual, and Research & Innovation. This was the fourth year of the Research & Innovation category, recognizing strides in research and innovation coming out of our region, elevating our communities’ awareness of advancement in architectural practice. This was the sixth year of the Energy in Design Award to commend projects that have made quantifiably significant strides in energy reduction while also maintaining the highest qualitative design caliber.

Across the spectrum of project types, the jury acknowledged the strong design culture represented in our region and were so impressed with the “high level of design excellence in projects that delight, inspire and enrich their communities all while having a positive impact on the environment.”

In addition to the main juried awards, it was the fourth year of the Young Voices Selection (YVS), a program with the aim to engage and elevate the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. The three YVS panelists, Kayla Ford Assoc. AIA (Integrus Architecture), Alex Ianchenko Assoc. AIA (The Miller Hull Partnership), and Ryan Nungester Assoc. AIA (Environmental Works), selected 1 Built project as the Young Voices Selection award winner.

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to our esteemed jury and Honor Awards Committee!

Visit the Online Gallery to learn more about the projects, as well as project team and collaborator information. Missed the live show? You can catch the replay here!

AWARD OF HONOR

Loom House by Miller Hull Partnership and Charlie Hellstern Interiors - Award of HonorThe Loom House by Miller Hull Partnership and Charlie Hellstern Interior Design is an extensive renovation of a classic mid-century home achieving full Living Building Challenge certification. The jury admired this particular residential example due to its thoughtful restrained approach to the existing building, seamlessly layering in extensive new technologies all while carefully integrating the home with the landscape.

 

Fort Worden Building 305 by Signal Architecture + Research - Award of HonorFort Worden Building 305 by Signal Architecture + Research is a historic military warehouse converted to a vibrant art center. The jury appreciated the dualities of this project: it has a precise technical approach to renovating a landmark building while also being an adaptable, open-ended, programmatically generous final result.

 

 

ENERGY IN DESIGN AWARD

Mukilteo Multimodal Ferry Terminal by LMN Architects is a transportation hub influenced by the Pacific Northwest’s native people. The jury appreciated this team’s thoughtful solution that skillfully and artfully incorporated civic needs with indigenous art, while also improving the health of the site.  They also greatly appreciated the use of extensive passive strategies to reduce the load on renewable energy sources.

AWARD OF MERIT

Rain Harvest Home by Robert Hutchison Architecture & JSa Arquitectura

HONORABLE MENTION

Clyde Hill Elementary School by Integrus Architecture
Constitution SHED by atelierjones
Duwamish Crossings by Wittman Estes 
Hayward Field by SRG Partnership
Othello Gardens by Wittman Estes 
Riverfront Pavilion by NAC Architecture & Berger Partnership
The Seattle Street Sink by The Clean Hands Collective
TOMO by Graypants
University Unitarian Church by Hacker Architects

YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Fort Worden Building 305 by Signal Architecture + Research

To view all of the 2021 submissions, visit the:

Click here for online gallery


THANK YOU TO OUR 2021 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Alaska AirlinesBetterBricks | Dovetail | Hoffman Construction CompanySellen Construction
USI Insurance ServicesAHBL  | Berger Partnership | Cary Kopczynski & Company, Inc.
Atlas Supply / DowsilEakman ConstructionFSi EngineersGLY Construction, Inc.
Hargis Engineers, Inc. | Inform InteriorsKPFF Consulting Engineers | Lane Powell
Magnusson Klemencic AssociatesMalsam Tsang Structural EngineeringMicrosol Resources Corp.
PCL Construction Services, Inc.PCS Structural SolutionsQuantum Consulting Engineers
RJM Precision InstrumentsSchuchartSkanskaSwenson Say Fagét | Thomas Fragnoli Construction Thornton Tomasetti | GRAY

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Honor Awards

AIA Seattle DRT + Sawhorse Revolution Collaboration

Danny Woo Garden Shed and Volunteers

AIA Seattle Diversity Roundtable (DRT) committee attracts, retains, and empowers individuals of underrepresented backgrounds in the profession of architecture through scholarship, community service, and activism.

Sawhorse Revolution is a non-profit that teams professional carpenters and architects with high-school-aged youth to design and build real structures for their own communities.

In late 2019, through ongoing talks Sawhorse Revolution established a partnership with InterIm CDA, a community organization under whose purview is Danny Woo Garden. The community was in need of a garden tool shed, which is where DRT & Sawhorse’s collective expertise came to play. The crucial part of the process was the involvement of WILD youth program since mentorship is of essence to their three organizations.

This design/build program was originally planned to be an in-person program; due to COVID_19, it was transformed into a virtual design program for Fall of 2020. Thirteen WILD youth, seven mentor architects (members of DRT), builders, educators, and InterimCDA staff, contributed to nine-week virtual design programming and mentorship. They learned about the Danny Woo community, the Chinatown-International District’s past and present architecture and design, and how to work in-and-for the community. Danny Woo Garden was started in 1975 as a community effort to revitalize the international district. With 1.5 acres of space in the heart of Seattle, Danny Woo Community Garden provides over 100 garden plots for elders of Asian descent, as well as 77 fruit trees, garden sheds, staircases, and more.

Finally, Sawhorse partnered with 13 youth to build the project in an in-city summer camp in 2021, led by Sawhorse Revolution staff and a team of dedicated volunteers and builders. On October 20th together with community members, the organizations held a public celebration as an official completion and opening of the project.

Photos courtesy of Lauren Greathouse.

Posted in Diversity Roundtable

2021 NWW Design Awards Winners Announced

Collage image of a waterfront, three-story mixed-use building, and a series of townhomes/congregate housing against farmland

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Northwest Washington Section hosted its virtual Design Awards on October 7 to celebrate excellence in Design.

The jury included Dr. Sharon Egretta Sutton, FAIA  (New York, Parsons School of Design), Rik Allen (Skagit County, Artist), and Tiffani Candler (Greater Seattle Area, Lydig Construction). The jury worked with AIA Northwest Washington members Dave Christensen AIA (Christensen Design Management) and Julie Blazek AIA (HKP Architects), who guided the Design Awards process.

From 17 submissions, the jury chose 12 projects for recognition with Citation, Merit, and Honor Awards across commercial, residential and unbuilt project designs. The submissions highlight the scope and quality of architectural design accomplished by the architects of our Northwest Washington region. While each of the projects had elements deserving commendation, the jury agreed that seven of the submissions are worthy of the Citation Award, three are worthy of the Merit Award, and two are worthy of the Honor Award.

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to our esteemed jury and Design Awards committee!

Click here to view the full Design Awards “winner” presentation.
Click here to view the full recording of the awards ceremony and keynote lecture.
Click here to view the full event program.

Honor Awards

Skagit County Seasonal Farmworker Housing, Burlington, WA

view of farmland with large tractor tilling a field, with blue sky, clouds, and beige housing in background

 

The jurors applauded the team’s success in adapting a traditional house pattern to heavy-duty use, while still maintaining a home-like environment. They emphasized that this project exemplifies design that lifts the human spirit and respects the earth, and it did so while adhering to strict budgetary and regulatory constraints.  The jurors agreed this is a true measure of excellence.

 

 

RMC Architects
Neil McCarthy, Architect AIBC, AIA, RMC Architects, Principal-in-Charge
Tony Cava, RMC Architects, Project Manager
Office of Rural and Farmworker Housing, Development Consultant
2020 Engineering, Civil Engineer
Kingworks Structural Engineers, Structural Engineer
Harris Group, Mechanical Engineer
K Engineers, Inc., Electrical Engineer
MMLA, Landscape Architect
GeoTest Services, Inc., Geotechnical Engineer
The Woolsey Company, Cost Estimating
Faber Construction, General Contractor
Owner/Client: Housing Authority of Skagit County
Photo credit: © Benjamin Benschneider All Rights Reserved


Spring Street Landing, Friday Harbor, WA

View from water of a boat against stacked-rock harbor, with a three-story mixed-use building in gray-and-yellow, with green trees

 

The jury agreed that the special environmental considerations, the creation of a public space that can be utilized by all regardless of economic resources, and the efforts given towards sustainability made this project worthy of the Honor Award. Notable features include daylighting, access to transit, on-site bicycle and shower facilities, low-flow plumbing fixtures, and low-impact building materials.

 

 

RMC Architects
Brad Cornwell, AIA, RMC Architects, Principal-in-Charge
Jason Williard, AIA, RMC Architects, Project Manager
BC+J Architecture, Concept Design & Land Use Permits
San Juan Surveying, LLC, Land Surveyor
J.A. Brennan Associates, PLLC, Landscape Architect
2020 Engineering, Civil Engineering
PND Engineers Inc., Civil Engineering/Marine Bulkhead
Kingworks Structural Engineers, Structural Engineer
Rice Group LLC, Mechanical Engineer
K Engineers, Inc, Electrical Engineer
Bargreen Ellingson, Kitchen Equipment
Wellman & Zuck, General Contractor
Owner/Client: Port of Friday Harbor
Photo credit: ©Mark Bergsma, All Rights Reserved


Merit Awards

Little Colt Lane Residence, Winthrop, WA

Mid-day view of timber cabin on bluff high above a valley, with cars parked under port, with blue skies

 

Many elements of this residential project stood out to the jurors due to the mindfulness the team applied in developing a home that would not only be a beautiful home to live in, but also includes many environmental and longevity considerations.

 

 

 

Designs Northwest Architects
Dan Nelson, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
Matt Radach, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Designer
Equilibria, Structural Engineer
Impel Construction, General Contractor
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: Entreri Photography


Squalicum Mountain Residence, Bellingham, WA

Dusk view of a luxurious mansion with dramatic lights and a many-car garage with wraparound driveway

 

In this beautifully effective home, the jury appreciated the utilization of passive solar coupled with thermal mass wall system, Geothermal heat pump, photovoltaic solar, and a rain catchment system, all being commendable energy offsets for this large residence. Notable features include cantilevered roof canopies, patio deck and natural light.

 

 

 

Zervas Architects
Terry Brown, AIA, Zervas Architects, Principal-in-Charge
Kelsey Gates, Zervas Architects, Project Manager
Freeland & Associates, Civil Engineering
Kingworks Structural Engineers, Structural Engineering
Pearson Construction, General Contractor
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: Benjamin Benschneider, Photographer


Graphite Arts Center, Edmonds, WA

Dusk image of an arts center with jaunty, asymmetrical roofline, and glowing light from inside along a street

 

The jury found the design elements connecting the industrial and Mill town history of Edmonds to this contemporary community art space very compelling. They appreciated the adaptable, open spaces for multiple functions for art creation, exhibitions, classes and events, designed with community in mind.

 

 

 

 

Pelletier + Schaar
David Pelletier, Pelletier + Schaar LLC, Designer and Architect of Record
Scott Miller, Scott G Miller Design Services, Design Architect
Bill Lentz, Ryan GC, Contractor
Carolyn Jewett, CG Engineering, Structural Engineer
Jared Underbrink, CG Engineering, Civil Engineer
Lauren Ruskauff, Pelletier + Schaar LLC, Project Manager, Photographer
Johnny Liu, Number 7 Studio PLLC, Architect
Robert Gregg, Gregg Property Associates, LLC, Owner’s Representative
Michael Aliaga, GLUMAC, Mechanical Engineer
David Fox, RDH Building Sciences, Envelope Consultant
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: William Wright, Wright Photography


Citation Awards

1318 Chuckanut Residence, Bellingham, WA

Portrait shot of tall, single-family residence with prominent garages and driveway, intersecting deck and rooflines against steep natural incline

 

Elements of this residential project stood out to our jury because of the complex challenges and creative solutions that the architect faced to create a home that not only met the client’s requests but exceeded their expectations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christensen Design Management
Design Team: David Christensen AIA, Architect
Collaborators: Istvan Harsanyi, Associate Architect, COM
Ryan Long, PE, Structural Engineer, Jones & Associates
Douglas Campbell, PE, Civil Engineer
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: David Christensen


Liv House, Stanwood, WA

 

The jurors commend the overhanging roof that, along with the cement slab, will eliminate the need for air conditioning even as the planet warms, and the efficient interior space that accommodates guests with a wide range of physical abilities. The jurors emphasize the embrace of aging in place, health and wellbeing, and sustainability.

 

 

 

Pelletier + Schaar
David Pelletier, Pelletier + Schaar, Architect of Record
Frank Silvestri, Brothers Construction, Contractor
Dan Parent, Perco Engineering, Structural Engineer
Joseph Smeby, Omega Engineers, Civil Engineering
Moris Moreno, Moris Moreno Photography, Photographer
Owner/Client: David & Karen Pelletier
Photo credit: Moris Moreno


Woodbluff Lane Residence, Camano Island, WA

Sunset image with purple clouds on the fringes of of home entry - oxidized panels on one half, wood beams on the other, wood-and-metal overhang at center to demarcate entry

 

The jury responded to the layout design considerations this home offers for the retiring clients, and elderly extended family. The use of low maintenance materials, and access to all the amenities on a single floor layout are well considered.

 

 

 

 

Designs Northwest Architects
Dan Nelson, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
Wayne Lovegrove, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Designer
Equilibria, Structural Engineer
Impel Construction, General Contractor
Lankford and Associates, Landscape Architect
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: S. Brousseau Photography


700 Harris Avenue Building for Evil Bike, Bellingham, WA

Slope-roofed light-industrial buildingwith large windows, and prominent second-floor deck, marked by "EVIL" logo on window

 

The jury found this commercial space, at the edge of historic Fairhaven, to be a pleasing compromise of aesthetics and function for an industrial space. They responded to the natural light shafts into the central gathering spaces and offices, the open mezzanine, and ample windows that make this a uniquely pleasant PNW work place.

 

 

Christensen Design Management
Design Team: David Christensen AIA, Architect
Lyle Erlewine, Associate Architect
Collaborators: Muni Vimavala SE, PSM Engineers, Structural Engineer
Erin Russell, PE, Axe Engineering, Civil Engineer
Tom Rengstorf ASLA, Rengstorf Associates, Landscape Architect
Don Harman, Heritage Design, PEB Consultant
Dawson Construction, Inc., General Contractor
Owner/Client: Haskell Corporation
Photo credit: David Christensen


Children’s Museum of Skagit County, Burlington, WA

Dusk shot of stripmall with Children's Museum in playful font, lit from the inside

 

The jurors were impressed that the firm’s services during the museum’s relocation involved strategic planning for a move that kept the museum operational, and in redeploying the exhibits, the firm reused materials and reconfigured them for new site conditions.

 

 

 

HKP Architects
Julie Blazek, Christine Baldwin, and Omar Velasco, HKP Architects, Architect
Jordan Janicki, PE, DCG, Structural Engineer
Owner/Client: Children’s Museum of Skagit County
Photo credit: Mike Penney Photography


Fairhaven Tower, Bellingham, WA

Urban, mixed-use building clad in brick on corner lot with clocktower placed at center

 

Elements of this project stood out to the jury due to the nod they give to its historical surroundings while paying tribute to the original building that stood in its place over 100 years ago. The clock tower is one of the nods to the original occupant of its predecessor, The Fairhaven Hotel.

 

 

 

 

 

Zervas Architects
Terry Brown, AIA, Zervas Architects, Principal-in-Charge
Jon Butcher, Zervas Architects, Project Manager
Freeland & Associates, Civil Engineering
Kingworks Structural Engineers, Structural Engineering
RAM Construction, General Contractor
Owner/Client: Not Available
Photo credit: Benjamin Benschneider


Meditation Retreat Center, Stanwood, WA

Rendering of two-story wood building with wraparound second-floor porch and pitched roof, on a hill

 

The jurors appreciated that the architects have created a compact, two-story building that is accessible without stairs and has functions tucked within a dramatic hip roof. The jurors emphasized its conserving approach to site planning that was made possible by thoughtful programming.

 

 

 

HKP Architects
Brian Poppe, Austin Miles, and Spencer Olsufka, HKP Architects, Architect
DCG Inc., Structural Engineer
FSi Engineers, Mechanical Engineer
TFWB Engineers, Electrical Engineer
Greenbusch Group, Inc., Acoustical Engineering
Food Services Design, Clevenger Associates
DCW Cost Management, LLC., Cost Estimator
Owner/Client: Bhakti Marga North America
Photo credit: HKP Architects


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2021 DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORS

Grey text on white background: Title Sponsor - blue flag logo "F" Freeland & Associates Civil Engineers www.freelandengineering.com. Platinum: TFWB Engineers, fsi Engineers, Tiger Construction, Aldrich, Fisher Construction Group. GOLD: Dawson, Judd & Black Appliance, Kingworks Structural Engineers, Zervas Architecture | Interior Design, HKP Architects, GeoTest, The Greenbusch Group Inc, Lund Opsahl

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington, For the Public

Advocacy Update – October 2021

STATE NEWS

Washington’s Tax System Overhaul Committee Would Like Your Feedback
Are you fed up with Washington’s tax system? This is your opportunity to let legislators know what you’d like to see instead. The state’s Tax Structure Work Group, led by a bipartisan group of state legislators, is conducting outreach to the public for feedback on six potential scenarios to revise the state’s taxation system. The Work Group is conducting listening sessions for North and Central Puget Sound residents, including Seattle, on Wed. Oct. 27. There are two sessions to choose from, 2:30-4pm and 6:30-8pm). More info on the Town Hall is here. While the entire tax system is up for discussion, you can read more about the treatment of the B&O tax, which AIA is tracking, here.

SBCC Commercial Energy Code Proposals Move to Public Comment
This month the State Building Code Council voted to move its Energy Code Technical Advisory Group’s package of commercial energy code proposals forward for public comment. These include AIA-supported proposals to require heat pumps for heating and water heating. The comment period is not yet open; we will notify you when it is. For more information on these proposals, please contact the archtiect representative on the SBBC, Kjell Anderson.


LOCAL NEWS

Two Housing Bills Passed by the Seattle City Council
An update on two Seattle housing bills that we reported on previously: the City Council voted unanimously to change the name of the city’s single family zoning category to “Neighborhood Residential.” This change does not make actual changes to the existing zoning (any changes will be part of the 2024 Comp Plan Update), but it will set the stage for future action by more accurately reflecting the reality that currently exists in single family zones and pointing to a need for greater inclusivity in land use policy. The Council also voted to revise previously passed legislation that provides development bonuses for affordable housing on land owned by religious organizations. At the urging of Donald King FAIA, the Council agreed to change the target for projects to 80% AMI from 60% AMI. Black churches in particular argued that the lower AMI threshold left them unable to participate in the program because only large developers can secure the major grants and federal tax grants needed to develop them. AIA supported both bills.

King County Council Considers Climate Legislation
King County’s Council is considering several items related to climate this month:

C-PACER: two years ago AIA worked at the state level to pass authorizing legislation to allow Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy & Resilience (C-PACER) financing programs. These private loans, administered as a lien on the property by a county, provide funding for building owners to perform deep energy and resilience-related retrofits. Importantly, these liens stay with the building when sold and not the owner, so the loans do not show up on an owner’s books. Each Washington county must authorize its own C-PACER program, and King County’s will provide critical financing for building improvements.

Green Building Ordinance Update: the King County Council is considering legislation to update the County’s 2013 Green Building Ordinance per its Strategic Climate Action Plan. The ordinance applies to King County-owned or -financed capital projects. The update places greater emphasis on equity and social justice in sustainable development; affirms the County’s carbon neutrality goals; and promotes green building in the private sector. More info here.

Building Code Update – Energy: King County has developed proposed updates to its building code to include stronger energy provisions based on Seattle’s recent energy code update. The changes are for new commercial or multifamily (4 stories or higher) buildings in unincorporated areas. Key improvements include restricting electric resistance and disallowing fossil fuel heating; requiring heat pump water heating; requiring 10% higher efficiency for lighting and windows; and eliminating substandard building envelopes.

The C-PACER and Green Building ordinances will be up for consideration in committee on Oct. 27. The Building Code update will likely be considered longer-term. If you are interested in reaching out to your King County Councilmember on any of these issues, please let Kirsten know.

Seattle Dept. of Construction and Inspections Updates
DADU Addresses: SDCI is now establishing separate, regular addresses and building numbers for detached accessory dwelling units. More info

Plan Review: SDCI announced that it will implement a new plan review process using the Bluebeam software application. The department plans to stop sending standard letter-based corrections for plan reviews and begin providing marked-up documents created with Bluebeam.


OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Seattle Housing Policy Statement
AIA’s Housing Task Force and Public Policy Board have been updating our 2019 Housing Policy Statement. Once approved by the Board of Directors, this statement will guide our work on local and regional housing policy and policy-oriented programming. We are looking for member feedback on the draft statement. You may review the document here; please send your comments to Kirsten.

Seattle Design Commission Seeks an Architect Member
The Seattle Design Commission is looking for an architect member. The Commission reviews city-funded capital projects and projects that seek long-term or permanent use of a right of way. Commissioners typically serve 15 hours a month in meetings that occur during the day. Commissioners receive a small stipend for their time. For more information, contact Michael Jenkins, Executive Director of The Seattle Design Commission, Michael.Jenkins@seattle.gov.

AIA|WA Advocacy Training
AIA Washington Council’s free Advocacy in Action series aims to turn you into an architect advocate on any issue that is important to you. It is designed for emerging professionals and students, but everyone is welcome. In this 3-part webinar (Nov. 4, 11, 18 | 12-1pm), you will discover how to navigate policy discussions in Olympia and elsewhere, build relationships with your elected representatives, and participate in AIA’s policy efforts. LU credits are provided.

Associates: Apply to join AIA National’s Associates Committee
AIA Washington Council is seeking candidates for appointment to serve as Washington’s State Representative to the AIA National Associates Committee (NAC) for a 2-year term. The NAC represents associates, in both traditional and non-traditional paths, by providing information and leadership to AIA components. The NAC representative will be involved in addressing local and national issues and will help to shape and dictate new policy. The appointed representative will also become an AIA|WA Board Associate and ex-officio member of the AIA|WA Board of Directors for the duration of their NAC term. Applications are due November 30, 2021. More information, including qualifications and how to apply, is available here.


EVENTS

AIA’s Public Policy Board Presents: Seattle Housing Policy Update
Seattle needs more housing, and fast. What is on the city’s short- and long-term housing agenda as we enter this pivotal period in our city? Join us for a review of current initiatives and a discussion of what’s missing and how AIA Seattle can help drive the agenda. Oct. 26 @ noon. More info.

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon. All are welcome. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

Bellevue City Council Candidates Forum
Bellevue residents: the Housing Development Consortium (AIA is a member) is hosting an Affordable Housing Forum with Bellevue city council candidates on October 25, 3-4 pm.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Design Review Reform

*This page is not intended for your reference, not the public – please do not forward the link*

 

Seattle Design Review Coalition Documents

Seattle for Everyone issue page

Seattle Design Review recommendations    7/21

Design Review talking points for budget hearings    10/21

Statement of legislative intent (Strauss)    9/21

Posted in Uncategorized

AHC Call for Board Members 2021

White text on purple background: Architecture for Health Committee

The Architecture for Health Committee is pleased to open the call for new members to its board. The committee is seeking two replacements this year:

  • Architect member from Washington
  • Affiliate member from Oregon 

Architect Board Member Thane Eddington and Affiliate Board Member Anthony Morton will be completing their terms this year. We thank them for their considerable contributions and years of generous service!

AHC Board Structure and Terms

The AHC Board consists of five Architects and two Affiliate Members from Washington and Oregon.

Architect Board Member Requirements

  • Practicing member of an architectural professional firm in the State of Washington
  • AIA Member
  • Licensure is not required (committee requirement of three licensed professionals has been met by remaining board members)
  • 5-year term commitment beginning on January 1, 2022

Affiliate Member Requirement

  • Practicing member in a healthcare design and construction field in the State of Oregon
  • Open to engineers, contractors, interior designers, vendors, Owner’s representatives, or similar
  • 2-year term commitment beginning on January 1, 2022

Architect members cycle through the leadership positions during their tenure. Affiliate members do not cycle through the leadership positions but serve in an advisory role and are actively involved in planning and organizing AHC meetings throughout their tenure.

AHC Board Responsibilities

Responsibilities of the board include establishing educational topics, planning programs, arranging for venues and speakers, moderating programs and outreach to professionals and academic communities in the Northwest region.

Programs are held three times a year, including co-sponsorship of the AIA Seattle Medical Design Forum in February. Board meetings are held virtually on a monthly basis.

Application

If you are interested in serving on the AHC Board, please send an email expressing your interest in a position and include a brief description of your background in healthcare design to Connor Descheemaker connord@aiaseattle.org by noon on Friday October 8, 2021. The current board will review applications and make selections at their next scheduled meeting on October 15, 2020.

If you are selected, you must be available for our annual all day board retreat in early December. Note: we anticipate this will occur virtually.

Posted in Architecture for Health Committee

AHC: Call for For Fall 2021 Conference Lightning Talks

White text on purple background: Architecture for Health Committee

OVERVIEW

This year’s AIA AHC Fall Event includes two days of virtual interdisciplinary presentations, design case studies, and conversations continuing the theme of resiliency in design and construction, while maintaining our focus on emotional well-being and mental health for all occupants. How we can overcome obstacles and challenges inherent in wholistic and resilient design in healthcare environments? On November 4th and 5th we welcome AEC and healthcare professionals to join us at this dynamic program.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

The AHC Fall Event audience includes: Architects, Designers, Engineers, Contractors, Healthcare Practitioners and Policymakers, Facility Owners/Managers, Urban Designers and Planners, and Public Health Professionals. The planning task force welcomes emerging professionals to the program, as their partnership is central to defining a sustainable future.

CALL FOR LIGHTNING TALK PRESENTATIONS

Submission Deadline: October 6, 2021 

We seek to convene a series of short “lightning” talk presentations (think PechaKucha format) that will deepen the audience’s understanding of current research and design innovations driving towards a focus on:

  • Resiliency: humanistic
  • Resiliency: built environment
  • Resiliency: natural environment
  • Disaster preparedness
  • Infrastructure innovation
  • Wholistic healthcare environments

Lightning Talks are an opportunity to share ideas and concepts under development and pushing the bounds of convention. We welcome a diversity of proposals from a variety of disciplines deploying design thinking to build a brighter future and strongly encourage emerging professionals and young designers to propose.

White text on red button: Click here to apply

PRESENTATION TOPICS

Proposals should specifically address innovation in the context of healthcare or healthcare environments. Possible subtopics are included below, but the list is not comprehensive, and should not limit submitters.

  • Innovative planning or design strategies that support healthy communities
  • Processes or techniques that integrate disaster preparedness into design (eg. wildfire, earthquakes, active shooter, pandemic).
  • Methodologies for measuring and monitoring care during construction.
  • Integrating mental health of patient care providers in design.
  • Integration and innovation in the natural environment supporting healthcare
  • Aging infrastructure, system redundancy, and the level of resiliency required.
  • Integrating wellness technology into patient care and staff care.

PRESENTATION FORMAT

Lightning talk presentations are short and should be no more than seven (7) minutes in length. Inspired by PechaKucha’s concise format, presentations must limit their slides (number of slides may vary), and set them to advance automatically.

Standard audio, visual, and digital media will be supported.

Presenters must submit their final PowerPoint presentation files to AHC no later than 5:00pm PST on Thursday, October 28. A PowerPoint template will be provided in advance, and late presentations will not be accepted.

We encourage presenters to use the following questions as a guide to prepare their short talks:

  • WHAT is the INNOVATION that your lightning talk will focus on? Is it a process, a tool, a product, a space, an interaction, etc.?
  • WHY the innovation? Identify the problem or challenge that prompted the innovation.
  • HOW was the innovation developed, tested, implemented in the context of healthcare environments?
  • WHO were the stakeholders in research, funding, implementation, etc.? Who was impacted by the innovation? Who was required to embrace the change and/or assume the risks?

EVALUATION CRITERIA AND SELECTION PROCESS

Lightning talk proposals will be evaluated by the AIA Seattle AHC Board Members with AIA staff. Successful proposals will:

  • Align with the event theme and objectives
  • Deepen audience understanding of a particular design innovation
  • Offer fresh insight and relevant information through the combination of words and visuals

Speakers should be able to effectively communicate messages to a variety of audience members. While relevant examples of innovation projects can be used for presentation (and credit given to the appropriate individuals/teams), the lightning talk sessions are not a platform for marketing a person or firm’s portfolio, services, or, strategies. Preference will be given to proposals by emerging professionals and young designers.

SUBMISSION PROCESS + KEY DATES

Please complete the submission form by 5:00pm on October 6, 2021. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Schedule and Deadlines

  • September 20, 2021: Call for lightning talks goes out
  • October 6, 2021: Proposals due
  • October 18, 2021: Acceptances issued
  • October 28, 2021: Final PowerPoint presentations due to AHC Committee
  • November 4 or 5, 2021: Presentations at 2021 AIA AHC Fall Event: Resiliency Through Physical Design, 8am – 12pm both days. NOTE: Exact date and time of presentation TBD pending finalization of conference schedule.

Registration

Free registration is offered to all presenters who want to attend the 2-day AIA AHC Spring Event. Please be advised that presenters will be responsible for any expenses incurred.

Inquiries

Please address any questions to:

Architecture for Health Committee

Fall Event Committee

AHCchairs@aiaseattle.org

Click here for full application and details **same as link above**

Posted in Architecture for Health Committee

Advocacy Update – September 2021

September advocacy update image

STATE NEWS

Washington’s Tax System Overhaul Under Discussion
Washington has a multi-year Tax Structure Work Group led by a bipartisan group of legislators and charged with researching, evaluating, and conducting public outreach around developing a new state taxation system that is not the most regressive in the nation. (Legislation is not expected to be considered until 2023.) AIA has been following this process closely with respect to the B&O. The Work Group has now released actual tax system overhaul scenarios with varying combinations of taxes.  Two of these scenarios would leave the B&O unchanged; four would replace it with a new tax or combination of taxes. More info on the scenarios is here.

AIA member input is needed. Getting the tax right from the beginning will be critical for architecture firms. Please consider providing input in one or both of the following ways:

  • Send AIA|WA your initial thoughts on the alternative taxes by the Work Group. Although we do not yet have much information on each proposal, your initial thoughts will be helpful in guiding AIA’s path forward.
  • AIA Task Force: AIA is putting together a workgroup of architects and firms willing to review the tax proposals more closely and identify a preferred alternative(s) by architects. If you or your firm is interested in participating, please contact Kirsten.
  • The state’s Tax Structure Work Group is conducting listening sessions on its proposed scenarios across the state – and input from architects is critical. Consider taking part in one of the 90-minute sessions.

State Contractor COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement
A reminder that all contractors working onsite at projects for state agencies, medical facilities, or in educational settings must provide proof of their COVID-19 vaccination status per Gov. Inslee’s vaccine mandate by Oct. 18. More info is available from AIA Washington Council here.


LOCAL NEWS

Legislation to Rename Seattle’s Single Family Zones Moves Through Council
Legislation to rename Seattle’s single family zoning category from “Single Family” to “Neighborhood Residential” will be voted on at a Sept. 24th City Council Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee meeting. This legislation does not make actual changes to the existing zoning (any changes will be part of the 2024 Comp Plan Update), but it will set the stage for future action by more accurately reflecting the reality that currently exists in single family zones and pointing to a need for greater inclusivity in land use policy. Please consider emailing your councilmember in support: more info here.

Seattle City Council Considers Revised Legislation for Affordable Housing on Land Owned by Religious Organizations  
In July, the City Council passed and Mayor Jenny Durkan signed legislation to allow religious institutions to access additional development capacity when they redevelop their properties for long-term rent- and income-restricted affordable housing. Donald King FAIA and the UW’s Renée Chang FAIA publicly argued that this change eliminated the ability of the Black churches that are working with the Nehemiah Initiative to utilize the program because projects at 60% AMI are so financially perilous that only large developers can secure the major grants and federal tax grants to develop them. Thanks to strong outreach by Donald and his coalition, the Council is taking the unprecedented step of considering new legislation to return to the original policy of 80% AMI. That legislation is up for a vote by the full Council on Monday, Sept. 27. Please consider emailing your councilmember in support: more info here.

AIA Seattle Coalition Releases Design Review Recommendations
AIA Seattle is participating in a coalition working to identify recommendations for reforming Seattle’s Design Review process. The list, containing a range of administrative and legislative changes, was recently released to the public. If you have comments, please let Kirsten know.

2020 ADU Production Report Released
Seattle’s Office of Planning & Community Development and Department of Construction & Inspections released a report on the first year of ADU production under new rules passed in 2019. The city issued permits for 237 AADUs and 276 DADUs in 2020, an increase of 53% and 112%, respectively, over units permitted in 2019. AIA would like to know what trends our members are seeing in terms of ADU design, permitting, and construction. Please send any comments to Kirsten.


OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Seattle Housing Policy Statement
AIA’s Housing Task Force and Public Policy Board have been updating our 2019 Housing Policy Statement. Once approved by the Board of Directors, this statement will guide AIA’s work on local and regional housing policy and policy-oriented programming. We are looking for member feedback on the draft statement. You may review the document here; please send your comments to Kirsten.

Seattle Public Schools Clean Energy Task Force
In February, AIA Seattle supported a Seattle Public Schools Board resolution on transitioning the district away from fossil fuels, which passed. Now, the District is organizing the Superintendent’s Clean Energy Task Force to help chart a path to: 1) transition the district away from fossil fuel use for operations by 2040; and 2) transition to 100% carbon-free renewable energy. If you are interested in helping to move Seattle Schools forward on clean energy, apply to join the Task Force by Oct. 8. More info here.

Seattle Budget School
Seattle’s annual budget process kicks off on Sept. 29, with the mayor and councilmembers identifying and negotiating priorities for the coming year. You can learn more about the budget process and how citizens can have an impact from Omari Salisbury of Converge and Kevin Schofield of Seattle City Council Insight via their YouTube series. Episode 1 – What is the Budget? and Episode 2 – Budget and the Law are available now. Look for more episodes soon.


MISC.

Check out AIA Seattle member David Mead’s video for the AIA Film Challenge. It’s time to MAKE IT ZERO!


EVENTS

Climate Advocacy Action – King County Energy Code
Climate Advocacy Action is back to provide support for local energy codes aimed at getting fossil fuels out of buildings. The 2021 edition will focus on King County’s effort to update its energy code for commercial and large multifamily buildings. King County’s changes will be similar to but slightly different than the Seattle Energy Code update that was the subject of last year’s Climate Advocacy Week. We’re looking for AIA members who live in King County and are willing to join a group meeting with their King County Councilmember. We’ll provide background info, talking points, and a group prep session. We’ll also be hosting a webinar with King County sustainability staff for those who want to learn more about the process.

If you don’t know who your King Council Councilmember is, this is a great way to find out!

  • Climate Advocacy Action Webinar: Oct. 12 @ noon
  • King County Councilmember meetings: October-November
  • More info or RSVP here.

AIA’s Public Policy Board Presents: Seattle Housing Policy Update
Seattle needs more housing, and fast. What is on the city’s short- and long-term housing agenda as we enter this pivotal period in our city? Join us for a review of current initiatives and a discussion of what’s missing and how AIA Seattle can help drive the agenda. Oct. 26 @ noon. More info.

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon.  All are welcome. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

2021 Seattle Elections: Candidate Forums

Housing Development Consortium: Affordable Housing
AIA Seattle members are invited to attend the Housing Development Consortium’s Seattle Candidate Forum on Affordable Housing on Sept. 28th at 4pm. This forum will cover the mayoral race as well as Council positions 8 and 9. More info and RSVP here.

Seattle Times + We Are In: The 2021 Homelessness Debates
Seattle mayoral candidates Bruce Harrell and M. Lorena González will engage in a 1-hour debate starting at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 29. Candidates running for Metropolitan King County Council District 3, Seattle City Attorney and Seattle City Council position 9. Thursday, Sept. 30 @ 5:30 pm. Register here.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Seattle’s City Council Takes a New Look at Policy for Affordable Housing on Property Owned by Religious Organizations

Background
Earlier this year, in compliance with state legislation (HB 1377) passed in 2019, the Seattle City Council passed and Mayor Jenny Durkan signed legislation to allow religious institutions to access additional development capacity when they redevelop their property for long-term rent- and income-restricted affordable housing.

The state law requires such projects to target households at a maximum of 80% AMI (area mean income), but it allows local governments to lower that threshold. The City Council passed an amendment to the bill that lowered the threshold to 60% AMI – so that projects housing households at 61-80% AMI would not receive the development bonuses.

Concerns by Black Churches
Donald King FAIA and the UW’s Renée Chang FAIA publicly argued that this change eliminates the ability of the Black churches that are working with the Nehemiah Initiative to utilize the program because projects at 60% AMI are so financially perilous that only large developers can secure the major grants and federal tax grants to develop them.

Thanks to strong outreach by Donald and a coalition of churches and other organizations, the Council is taking the unprecedented step of considering legislation to return to the original policy of 80% AMI. That legislation is up for a vote by the full Council meeting on Monday, Sept. 27.

Outreach to Councilmembers Needed
If you live in Seattle, please consider sending an email to your councilmember asking them to support this legislation. You can send a separate email to Councilmembers Lorena González and Teresa Mosqueda, who represent the entire city, or just copy them on the email to your district councilmember.

Note that Councilmembers Mosqueda and Dan Strauss are the sponsors of this new legislation, so they will vote yes. If you live in Councilmember Strauss’ district, you are welcome to send an email thanking him for his leadership on this issue.

Here’s how:

  1. You can find email addresses here. (Phone calls are also fine.)
  2. Start your email by telling the councilmember(s) where you live (your neighborhood) and asking that they vote yes on CB 120157.
  3. Tell them why passing this bill is important to you or to the city. AIA is focusing its comments around the need for BIPOC communities to be able to control their own development projects. You can see AIA’s and NOMA NW’s letter on the original legislation here and read Donald King’s letter on the current legislation from the Nehemiah Initiative here.
  4. This can be very brief! “Please vote yes on CB 120157” is actually sufficient.

Emails should be sent by Sept. 26.

That’s it!  It can be very brief. If you have questions, please reach out to Kirsten.

Thank you!

Posted in Advocacy

Housing Advocacy: Neighborhood Residential

Legislation to rename Seattle’s single family zoning category from “Single Family” to “Neighborhood Residential” will be voted on at a Sept. 24th Land Use & Neighborhoods City Council Committee meeting. This legislation does not make actual changes to the existing zoning (any changes will be part of the Comp Plan Update), but it will set the stage for future action by more accurately reflecting the reality that currently exists in single family zones and pointing to a need for greater inclusivity in land use policy.

Importantly, changing single family zoning does not mean getting rid of single family homes. It means getting rid of a zoning category that only allows single family homes and prohibits duplexes/triplexes/etc. and smaller multi-family in most residential neighborhoods.

What you can do
Outreach to committee members is needed Sept. 20-23. The legislation will be discussed at a public hearing on Wednesday, Sept. 22 and will be voted on by the committee on Friday, Sept. 24.

It’s as easy as sending an email
Please send an email to your councilmember (as well as Councilmember Gonzalez, who represents the entire city) asking them to support CB 120155 in the Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee this week. You can also call if you prefer.

Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee Members 
4 – Alex Pedersen
5 – Debra Juarez
6 – Dan Strauss
7 – Andrew Lewis
At large – Teresa Mosqueda (Mosqueda is sponsoring the legislation and will be a yes)
At large – Lorena González

*If your councilmember is not on the committee, we’ll ask you to weigh in a bit later, as this legislation is expected to go to the full Council for final approval on Oct. 4.

Messaging
The email can be very brief! Start with where you live (your neighborhood) and ask that they vote yes on CB 120155 in the Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee this week.

Tell them why this change is important to you, which could include:

  • Our existing residential zoning categories are based on historical redlining policies that intentionally excluded people of color. It is important that we reverse this policy, and this legislation starts to do that, even if in name only.
  • Existing zoning is not currently single family only even if it is called that. ADU and DADU units were authorized three years ago to be added to single family parcels. Grandfathered in apartment buildings and ‘plexes also exist in these zones.
  • The upcoming Comp Plan Update is the most critical in our city’s history. This change sets the stage for that process by acknowledging that we need to increase housing opportunity and inclusivity in our land use policies.
  • “Single family” doesn’t accurately or inclusively reflect the diverse households that exist across Seattle—multigenerational households, group households, and multiple families living on a single parcel are all not reflected in this terminology.
  • Add your own!

Public Comment
The opportunity to provide 2-minute public comment via phone is available at both meetings (Sept. 22 and Sept. 24) – if you are interested, contact Kirsten for more info.

If you need help or have any questions, please reach out to Kirsten.

Thank you for taking the time to engage in advocacy on this important issue – your input makes a difference!

Posted in Advocacy, Housing, Public Policy Board

Climate News Roll

AUGUST 2021

AIA Media Outreach
In the wake of the “heat dome,” The Everett Herald ran an op-ed by AIA Seattle Board Member Michael Stevens AIA of Dykeman Architects about the use of heat pumps as a climate-friendly way to cool and heat homes. This was particularly timely in light of the August release of a long-anticipated and particularly damning U.N. scientific report on climate change by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 

 

FEBRUARY 2021

Seattle Schools Chart Path to Fossil Fuel Free
In February, Seattle Public Schools became the first school district in Washington to pass a resolution to transition to 100 percent clean and renewable energy by 2040 by eliminating all use of fossil fuels in district electricity, heating, cooling, cooking, and transportation. The school board also resolved to halt constructing new buildings with fossil fuel infrastructure immediately, to choose electric and other clean appliances for any major renovations and replacements, and to prioritize zero-emission vehicles where feasible for any new vehicle purchases. AIA Seattle sent the School Board a letter in support of the resolution.

 

FEBRUARY 2020

Mayor Issues Executive Order on a Green New Deal for Seattle
In January, Mayor Durkan signed an Executive Order committing Seattle to making sure that all new or substantially altered City of Seattle buildings operate without fossil fuels and developing a strategy to eliminate fossil fuel use in existing city buildings by January 2021. The Executive Order also requires annual Green New Deal reports through 2030 and directs the Office of Sustainability & Environment to engage stakeholders to achieve the following goals of the Green New Deal:

  • Reduce pollution to limit average global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C;
  • Promote economic opportunity and inclusive access to stable, well-paying jobs; and
  • Advance environmental justice by ensuring the benefits and investments of the clean energy transition accrue to those communities and populations historically most burdened by the fossil fuel economy.

AIA Seattle applauds these moves and hopes that the city’s actions will help further work to address emissions from privately-owned buildings, including a ban on new gas hookups that is currently being considered by the City Council.

 

JANURARY 2020

Durkan Announces an Electric Municipal Building Directive
This month Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan signed an executive order that will require all new and substantially altered city buildings to operate without fossil fuels and direct the city to develop a strategy to eliminate fossil fuel use in existing city buildings by January 2021.  Last year, the City Council passed a Green New Deal resolution that said Seattle would seek to eliminate climate pollutants in the city by 2030.  This order instructs the Office of Sustainability and Environment to convene an interdepartmental team, start work on various Green New Deal actions, and engage with stakeholders.  AIA Seattle members will participate in this process and are currently participating on a City Council workgroup aimed at passing legislation to ban gas hookups in new buildings.  This legislation was proposed by former councilmember Mike O’Brien last fall and stakeholders are working with new and remaining councilmembers to find a new legislative champion.  Bellingham is also considering a ban on natural gas for residential heating.

 

NOVEMBER 2019

Natural Gas Ban
A group of AIA Seattle members met with Councilmember Mike O’Brien and a larger group of stakeholders to discuss the electrification of buildings and their work on successful projects that were built without gas. O’Brien is sponsoring legislation to ban gas hookups in new buildings, but the proposal has received significant pushback from labor groups. It is unlikely to pass in the time remaining and, given O’Brien’s retirement, it will need to find a new champion in 2020.

 

SEPTEMBER 2019

Climate Legislation Moves Through Council
The Seattle City Council acted on legislation related to climate change, including the tax on heating oil and the Seattle Green New Deal reported on last month. The full Council previously passed a resolution outlining goals for the Green New Deal and, on Sept. 16, passed an ordinance establishing an Oversight Board to recommend policies, projects, and programs based on the goals outlined in the resolution. The full City Council passed the legislation to tax heating oil and help low-income households convert to electricity on Sept. 23. In addition, the Council’s Sustainability and Transportation Committee has been holding hearings on legislation to prohibit new gas hook-ups in all new buildings permitted after July 1, 2020. AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board approved support for all of these initiatives with clarification that we would like to see the Green New Deal goals prioritized according to how much each will reduce carbon emissions. Individuals interested in joining the Seattle for a Green New Deal effort can find more info here.

 

AUGUST 2019

Seattle Passes Local Green New Deal Resolution
Seattle City Councilmember Mike O’Brien introduced a resolution laying out the agenda for a Green New Deal for Seattle and an ordinance creating a Green New Deal Oversight Board. The resolution endorses the Federal Green New Deal and identifies five goals for a Seattle Green New Deal:

  • Make Seattle free of pollutants that have climate impacts by 2030;
  • Prioritize investments most harmed by economic, racial, and environmental injustices;
  • Advance an equitable transition from an extraction-based economy to one based on “regeneration and cooperation;”
  • Ensure that those with the least amount of power and wealth are positioned to lead during the transition;
  • Create stable, living-wage jobs that prioritize local hiring, and protect jobs with Project Labor Agreements and Labor Harmony Agreements.

Specific initiatives can be reviewed in the resolution text. The resolution was fast-tracked through the Council process and was approved by the full Council on Aug. 12. The ordinance was reviewed at the Aug. 6 Sustainability and Transportation Committee meeting and will be revisited by that committee at a future meeting. AIA Seattle has generally supported the Green New Deal at both the national and local scales.

Seattle Proposes Speeding Up Oil to Electric Heating Conversions
Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan announced a plan to speed up the conversion of homes that burn oil for heat to cleaner electric heating as part of the city’s 2018 Seattle Climate Strategy. The Mayor is expected to send the City Council legislation this month that would impose a tax on heating oil and require heating oil tank owners to decommission or upgrade all existing underground oil tanks by 2028. Revenue from the tax will provide rebates and grants for Seattle homeowners to install energy efficient electric heat pumps. Although AIA Seattle has not weighed in on this specific proposal, we have supported this concept as part of our work with Shift Zero to move Washington closer to a zero net carbon built environment.

 

NOVEMBER 2019

Natural Gas Ban
A group of AIA Seattle members met with Councilmember Mike O’Brien and a larger group of stakeholders to discuss the electrification of buildings and their work on successful projects that were built without gas. O’Brien is sponsoring legislation to ban gas hookups in new buildings, but the proposal has received significant pushback from labor groups. It is unlikely to pass in the time remaining and, given O’Brien’s retirement, it will need to find a new champion in 2020.

 

OCTOBER 2018

OSE Issues Benchmark Report
The Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment released a new benchmarking analysis report to update trends from energy performance data reported to the City from 2014-2016. The report highlights key building energy and emissions metrics for the 3,300 benchmarked buildings and reveals that continuously benchmarked buildings have reduced emissions, saved money, and improved performance over time. AIA supports funding for energy benchmarking at both the city and state levels.

 

SEPTEMBER 2018

AIA Supports I-1631
Both AIA Seattle and AIA Washington Council have endorsed I-1631, the November ballot measure initiative to put a fee on carbon and reinvest the funds into projects that will reduce carbon communities and assist heavily impacted communities. Here are some ways to get involved:

AIA Seattle Phone Bank
AIA Seattle is hosting an I-1631 phone bank for volunteers who would like to help solicit support for the initiative. The campaign will provide phone numbers and talking points, and we’ll be calling fellow citizens to encourage their support. Wednesday, Oct. 10, 6-8:30 pm (attend anytime); pizza provided.

Support I-1631 Signs for Your Firm
AIA Seattle has “This Business Supports Clean Air” window signs in support if the I-1631 carbon fee ballot measure available for any members or firms that would like one. Signs can be picked up at our office at the Center for Architecture & Design, 1010 Western Ave., Seattle. Hours are 10-6, Monday-Thursday and 10-5 Friday.

 

JULY 2018

Seattle 2030 Challenge Pilot Program
The Seattle City Council and Mayor Jenny Durkan enacted legislation creating the 2030 Challenge Pilot Program in July. The Pilot will provide up to two additional floors and a 25% floor area ratio bonus (30% for unreinforced masonry buildings) in exchange for major renovation projects meeting the performance goals of the 2030 Challenge for energy usage, water management and transportation. For more information, see the city’s Pilot Program website.

 

APRIL 2018

Mayor Jenny Durkan Announces Climate Priorities
AIA Seattle Executive Director Lisa Richmond joined Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan as she announced short- and long-term actions to achieve benchmarks laid out in the Paris Climate Accord. Her proposal to study congestion pricing in downtown Seattle received the most attention, but Durkan also identified plans to require electric charging stations in new construction, phase out fossil fuels in city vehicles and fund the conversion of 18,000 homes from oil heat to electric. She called out building energy use as the second largest source of climate emissions, repeating a previous commitment to a 20-building pilot project that will offer additional height and space incentives for energy use upgrades and announcing the expansion of Seattle City Light’s pay-for-performance energy efficiency program to encourage building owners to invest in deep energy upgrades. Durkan also pledged to double previous funding to cut energy use and carbon emissions in municipal buildings.

 

MARCH 2018

AIA Letter to Mayor Durkan on Climate
In response to Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan’s comments on climate as part of her State of the City address in February, AIA sent Durkan a letter thanking her for making climate change a priority of her administration, emphasizing the importance of policies that encourage high-performing buildings and stressing the need to include climate issues on all City department agendas.

Posted in Uncategorized

Welcome to Melissa K. Neher – Our New Executive Director!

Melissa Neher Executive Director headshot

Melissa is from upstate NY, and from a small town start has lived all over the world, including London, Japan, Chicago, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Sydney. Melissa and her family made Seattle home in 2009, embracing the natural beauty, outdoor lifestyle and community values of a thriving region.

Melissa has decades of experience in nonprofit leadership as a problem solver. She began her career as a social worker for adults with physical disabilities, realizing early on that systemic inequity was the underlying cause of most of the challenges her clients faced. Melissa sought systemic solutions through advocacy by attending law school. As a social justice lawyer, Melissa advocated for underserved and marginalized communities, including asylum seekers and migrant workers.

Melissa witnessed firsthand the transformative power of the built environment when a legal clinic she co-founded received a donation of space for their work with asylum seekers. More than just a safe place for vulnerable people, the space became a place to make connections and build community. Before her time at Architects Without Borders Seattle, Melissa secured support for Refugee Women’s Alliance’s (ReWA’s) expanded flagship facility in Rainier Valley for immigrant and refugee populations at a time when such communities were disproportionately impacted by regressive federal policies.

Melissa enjoys working side by side with architects as problem solvers and community builders, and is dedicated to and excited to lead the combined vision of AIA Seattle and Seattle Design Festival’s culture of design that fosters equitable, resilient, thriving communities. She views climate change as an urgent social justice issue, and AIA Seattle as a leader for advocacy and responsible action in the sphere of the built environment.

Please join us in welcoming Melissa to the organization! We are excited to be working alongside Melissa, as we navigate a “new normal” in our region and profession. She will have a running start implementing our new five year strategic plan, supporting the board of directors and managing a dedicated and resilient staff. Together we will continue to bring members the programs, resources, and connections they need to thrive, and continue our collective work on our strategic imperatives: Climate, Housing, and Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion.

Sincerely,
Myer Harrell AIA
President ’21-22
Weber Thompson

Brendan Connolly AIA
Past-President ’20-21
Mithun

Marisa H. Zylkowski
Past-President, Seattle Design Festival ’20-21
Rushing

Melissa K. Neher’s pronouns are she/her. She begins her time with AIA Seattle + Seattle Design Festival today, September 13. She received her BA in Public Relations with a minor in Art History from James Madison University, and her Juris Doctorate from University of San Diego School of Law where she was a lead articles editor for San Diego Law Review and received the Outstanding Public Interest Advocate award. Melissa can be contacted via email and phone number listed on our staff page.  

Posted in Committees, Design In Public, For the Profession, For the Public

Career Ladder Webinar

Asian American Designers Union (AADU) is a committee that was established under AIA Seattle earlier this year. Conceived as a support system that connects, empowers, and advocates for Asian American designers here in the Seattle area, AADU assists in promoting diversity and equality within the architecture and design industry, and connects professionals from different industries, within the US and abroad, to foster relationships and shared experiences.

As the first discussion of a new series hosted by AADU-S, Career Ladder which will be held virtually on September 29th, from 12- 1:00 pm, invites Asian American designers and other designers in leadership positions to share their experiences and career insights with students, recent graduates, as well as young and seasoned professionals. Acknowledging the intersectionality of all our experiences and struggles, the event welcomes the voices and stories of all members of the architecture and design community. We are hoping that this will be a space to reconnect designers and professionals within our communities, to advocate for the Asian American presence and experience in the design industry, and to render a better understanding of the influences that diverse Asian cultures have had on architectural approach and practice.

Panelists:

Alex Rolluda | Owner | Rolluda Architects

Chi Aoyama | Associate Principal | Mithun

Grace Kim | Founding Principal | Schemata Workshop

Hui Tian | Owner | Studio 19 Architects

Moderator:

Kailin Wang | AADU-S

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US: +1 253 215 8782 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 929 205 6099
Webinar ID: 827 9602 8027
Passcode: 515338
International numbers available: https://us06web.zoom.us/u/kGFZyZcRH

Posted in Asian American Design Union, Uncategorized

Day of Dialogue: Design for Early Learning

Over four segments, this year’s Day of Dialogue will provide a forum for leading-edge thinking around the design of spaces for early learning, with a focus on the impact these spaces have on the child, educator, family and community. Where do our youngest children spend their days, and how can these spaces designed to foster children’s learning, health, social interaction and happiness? How can kids’ and families’ early learning experiences be made more equitable and inclusive? How can we include delight, wonder, play, and access to the natural world in every space designed for young children?

REGISTER HERE!!

The symposium seeks to:

· Cultivate relationships between design professionals and early childhood education professionals, with an eye toward closing the distance between design thinking and pedagogy.

· Use design to foster increased inclusion and resilience in our facilities

 

Presentations and discussions will allow attendees to examine new ideas and perhaps even challenge long-held beliefs. Short videos will provide a brief break mid-session, and highlight some of the region’s exemplary programs and spaces. A post-symposium program will create and fund partnerships between design professionals and early learning practitioners to foster continued cross-field dialogue.

 

Participation will benefit those working in the following areas: early learning program design and administration, child development, public policy, social services, architecture, interior design, landscape architecture.

 

Outcomes/Learning Goals include:

· Recognition of the importance of healthy spaces for children, educators and families

· Engagement with appropriate materials and effective uses of space for early learning

· Review of child development as it relates to facility design

· Increased design responsiveness to identity, equity and cultural context

· Development of interdisciplinary connections and partnerships between educators and design professionals

REGISTER HERE!!

Schedule and Themes:

Monday, September 13, 2021 8-10 AM Design Thinking: Common Language

We will ground the symposium in thoughts about how intention, planning and design thinking can benefit all users of a space, and how kids, parents, teachers, staff, administrators, and the community will do better if the spaces they all use are well-designed. We introduce the link we want to foster between professionals in early learning and architecture; invite Diane and Alissa to discuss the origins of this idea; and talk with the panel about fostering empathy, flexibility, and impact through design. Finally we preview the last session, which will focus on including kids in the design process and creating a common language for collaboration.

 

Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 8-10 AM Design Lens: Welcoming ALL Kids and Families

Inclusion has many facets in early learning, both explicit and implicit. As with many aspects of our daily lives, early learning spaces need to sharpen their focus on welcoming all children and their families, and on the process by which all voices are heard. And at a larger scale, we must ensure that ALL families – and all members of those families – have access to excellent resources during early childhood. We will consider the role of practitioners, administrators, parents and designers in the development of environments that allow for equitable participation by members of diverse communities.

 

Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 4-6 PM Design Lens: Resilient People, Places and Programs

Resilience is important at all scales. Facilities and programs must be designed to ensure that their facilities, operations and financial models are resilient and sustainable. Resilience must also be cultivated in individuals, in families and in classrooms. This past year has highlighted our ability (or lack thereof) to pivot, to be nimble, to cultivate agility. What does it mean to design for resilience? What do spaces for young children look like when they are created with agility and flexibility in mind? What factors test our resilience, and how can we support each other as we prepare for the next challenges?

 

Saturday, September 18, 2021, 10 AM-noon Design Partnerships

As we prepare to connect designers and early learning professionals, we will turn our attention to partnerships. We will consider partnerships that include the adults who lead and manage learning environments, as well as designers, builders, agencies, foundations, cities, counties, state governments, and of course the children themselves. We will touch on the process of building partnerships, engaging design teams, and infusing everything you do with your mission, vision, values and core purpose in mind.

Event Sponsors:

  • DLR Group
  • Enterprise Community Partners, Inc.
  • Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center
  • Bamford Foundation
  • AIA Seattle – Committee on Architecture for Education
  • Natural Pod – Learning Furniture

Organizers:

  • Alissa Rupp, FAIA, FRAME | Integrative Design Strategies
  • Diane Kroll, Imag(e)ine
Posted in Committee for Architect for Education

AHC Honor of Distinction – Call for Nominations

White text on purple background: Architecture for Health Committee

Early in 2020, the AHC Board introduced an initiative to dedicate time and resources to recognize members of our AHC community who have gone above and beyond in their careers to contribute, mentor and lead. This AIA AHC Honor of Distinction is intended to recognize a single individual who has distinguished themselves in the design and construction healthcare arena. The time has come to introduce this honor and make a call for nominations!

Please take some time to think about individuals who have inspired you to excel in the Healthcare Design and Construction Industry. We are seeking nominations for individuals who have contributed to exceptional Design Excellence, Mentorship, Advanced Learning and Public Service throughout their career. Follow the link below to learn more about this recognition and to submit a nominee. The Board will review all applications and select the Honor of Distinction recipient to be recognized at our upcoming Fall Event.

Download the Nomination Instructions and Application Here.

 

 

 

Posted in Architecture for Health Committee

Advocacy Update – August 2021

LOCAL NEWS

2020 MHA Report Released
Seattle’s Office of Housing released its first annual report on the city’s Mandatory Housing Affordability and Incentive Zoning program, including long-anticipated data on housing projects’ use of payment versus performance under the program. While any adjustments to the MHA pricing will likely occur only as part of the city’s major Comprehensive Plan update (2021-24), AIA is interested in member comments on what you are seeing in this report. Please contact Kirsten.

Legislation to Rename Seattle’s Single Family Zones Moves Through Council
Legislation to rename Seattle’s single family zoning category to “neighborhood residential” was discussed during the Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee meeting on July 28 and will be up for a public hearing in the same committee on Sept. 22 followed by a committee vote tentatively scheduled for Sept. 24. If you would like to weigh in with your city councilmember(s) on this issue, you can do so via email or phone. You can also testify via phone at either of the Sept. 22 or Sept. 24 committee meetings. This change would impact the name only; it would not impact what is currently allowed in single family zones. Any changes to existing zoning will be part of the major Comprehensive Plan Update scheduled to be completed in 2024.

Council Committee Passes Legislation to Fill Downtown Storefronts
Legislation to allow additional uses for downtown storefronts was approved by the City Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee on July 28 and will move to the full City Council for approval in September. The legislation is aimed at finding uses for empty downtown spaces by allowing additional uses that are currently allowed in other neighborhoods but not downtown. The ordinance would be temporary, lasting for 12 months (unless Council extends it), but any permits authorized under it would be permanent. Additional info is contained in the Director’s Memo. This is a good time to contact your city councilmember(s) if you would like to comment on this legislation.

Small Lot Development Standards Legislation Introduced
Seattle’s Office of Planning and Community Development has proposed legislation to support development on small lots in the Downtown Mixed Residential zones of Belltown. The purpose is to simplify building forms, allowing more consistent floor layouts that will enable modular and panelized construction. The goal is to facilitate more housing in Belltown’s DMR zones by implementing one of the recommendations of the Affordable Middle-Income Housing Advisory Council on innovative construction. This legislation is currently pending before the Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee.

Seattle’s Stormwater Code Update Takes Effect
Seattle’s updated Stormwater Code and Manual went into effect on July 1. There are some significant changes, which you can review on SDCI’s Stormwater Code website. SDCI will hold Q&A sessions on the code every Wednesday in August from 2-3 pm.

Regional Housing Strategy Open for Comment
In July, the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) released its draft Regional Housing Strategy (RHS). The strategy is a collection of regional and local measures to preserve, improve, and expand the region’s housing inventory. It is intended to support the region’s many housing actors and future housing planning actions, including Washington’s Growth Management Act and PSRC’s (King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties) Vision 2050, that help direct the four-county region’s growth. You can read more about the Strategy itself here. The PSRC is seeking public comment on the draft document, which you can access here.

Shoreline Moves Forward on Energy Code Proposal
On August 16, the Shoreline City Council voted to direct city staff to develop an ordinance that would adopt stronger energy code provisions for commercial and large multifamily buildings. Shoreline is taking the lead from Seattle’s 2021 code language, which largely eliminates fossil fuels from new commercial buildings. See the Shoreline City Council notes here. AIA Seattle submitted a letter in support of this action. Thank you to C. Ray Allshouse AIA, Shoreline’s building official, and Duane Jonlin FAIA, Energy Code & Conservation Advisor for the City of Seattle, for helping to move this proposal forward.


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board Seeks New Members
The Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board is a public volunteer board that advises the Mayor, City Council, and City Departments on projects, policies, and programs that improve or impact bicycling conditions in Seattle. Three seats are currently open on the Board. More information is available here. Applications are due by Friday, August 27.


EVENTS

Join us at the Seattle Design Festival! Aug. 21-22
The Seattle Design Festival Block Party is a two-day street fair celebrating the powerful ways design affects our lives. This fun outdoor event is an opportunity for the design community and the public to come together and interact through large-scale design installations, performances, and design activities all centered around the Festival’s 2021 theme, EMERGE. Join us Aug. 21-22 at Lake Union Park!

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

Upcoming Events – Dates TBD
These online events will occur in September or October but do not yet have a firm date. If you would like to be notified when one or more are scheduled, please let Kirsten know.

  • Seattle Housing Policy Update – AIA’s Public Policy Board will provide an update on the many pieces of housing policy swirling around Seattle right now (late September).
  • Seattle Budget Process 101 – Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda’s staff will lead us in an overview of how Seattle’s annual budgeting process works and how you can provide input and advocacy (mid-September – the budget process itself will run October-November).
  • Climate Advocacy Week – this event is back to provide support for local energy codes designed to get fossil fuels out of buildings. The 2021 edition will focus on King County’s effort to update its energy code for commercial and large multifamily buildings. King County’s changes will be similar to but slightly different than the Seattle Energy Code update that was the subject of last year’s Climate Advocacy Week. We’ll be looking for AIA members interested in joining a virtual group meeting with their King County Councilmember and presenting a webinar for those who want to learn more about the King County process and other building electrification measures locally and statewide (early October).

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

AIA Seattle Announces 2021 Honorees

Honorees are nominated by their peers and selected by the Fellows & Honors committee each spring. AIA Seattle is delighted to recognize these recipients for their exceptional achievements and to showcase the diversity of professionals who make our region’s design community so purposeful and beautiful. Please join us in congratulating the 2021 Honorees!


Individual Awardees Celebration Monday, November 8 at Town Hall Seattle

This year, we are excited to recognize and celebrate our individual awardees for their outstanding contributions to the profession and our community at the Individual Awardees Celebration on Monday, November 8 at Town Hall Seattle.

Individual Awardees Celebration | Town Hall Seattle’s Forum

  • 4:30pm – Doors Open for Individual Awardees Celebration (Forum Entrance off Seneca St)
    • Bar opens (21+)
  • 5:15pm – Individual Awardees Celebration Begins | Town Hall Seattle’s Forum
  • 6:30pm – Program Ends
    • Those also attending the Honor Awards Live Event will make their way to the lobby

Click here for more info

Interested in continuing the night with us at the Honor Awards for Washington Architecture Live Event? Learn more and get tickets here.


2021 HONOREES

Gold Medal

Anne Schopf FAIA

Anne Schopf FAIA has been recognized, over her 37-year career, with more than 80 international, national, regional, and local design awards, including four AIA COTE Top Ten Awards. Anne joined Mahlum Nordfors McKinley Gordon in 1990 and became Design Partner in 2004, helping to transform the practice into a Design First Firm. She continues to drive the firm’s vision of creating healthy and sustainable environments for the communities they serve. Elevated to Fellow of the Institute under Category 1 Design, Anne was awarded the Medal of Honor from AIA Northwest Pacific Region in 2013, and under her leadership, Mahlum received the AIA NWPR Firm Award in 2014.

Anne’s deep commitment to design excellence and building performance has led her to participate at a national AIA leadership level with both the Committee on the Environment and the Committee on Design. With the aim to transform the culture of design into one that examines environmental performance and social impact as an imperative, Anne has driven performance metrics into design awards programs nationwide through the development of the Common App, sparking local AIA Components and Knowledge Communities to incorporate performance metrics as a part of their submission and jurying process. Anne has also successfully sponsored over 25 international architects for elevation to Honorary FAIA. In Seattle, Anne served as Chair of the Honor Awards program, previously sat on the Board of Directors, participated in numerous committees, and served as AIA Seattle’s President in 2010.

 

Young Architect Award

Chris Hellstern AIA

Chris is the Living Building Challenge Services Director, architect and author with The Miller Hull Partnership in Seattle with a variety of project experience including five certified Living Buildings and several more currently in design. Chris has dedicated his career to progressing sustainability within the built environment. Having completed numerous projects including public and private facilities he works with teams to initiate, plan and coordinate the execution of sustainable goals ranging from Zero Energy certification to Living Building Challenge Certified projects.

His book, Living Building Education, chronicles the story behind his first Living Building, the Bertschi School. Chris founded the Seattle 2030 Roundtable and co-founded the Healthy Materials Collaborative. A Living Future Accredited professional and a Living Building Challenge Hero, Chris is a university guest lecturer and speaker at numerous conferences across the country. He works on state and local environmental policy with AIA Washington, publishes articles and volunteers with local school groups mentoring students about sustainable practices and advocacy. As an Affiliate Instructor with the University of Washington, Chris teaches a graduate sustainability course for the College of Built Environments.

Margaret Knight AIA

Woman in black, sleeveless top and curly hair, turning her head and smiling, in front of unfocused nature background

Margaret is a licensed architect in the state of Washington, has served on AIA Seattle’s Board of Directors, and is a past chair of AIA Seattle’s Diversity Roundtable (DRT). As a woman of color, Margaret is passionate about encouraging and promoting diversity within the architectural profession.

Following her graduation from Cornell University, Margaret conducted participatory design workshops in Kenya, to create productive public spaces outside of Nairobi. Since joining Schemata Workshop in 2015, Margaret has worked on several community-focused projects centered around EDI issues impacting Seattle area communities. From affordable housing projects to neighborhood design guidelines in Seattle’s Central Area and Chinatown-International District, Margaret is passionate about the role community engagement can play in the design process, especially in communities of color. She believes that representation matters, and has focused her efforts outside of the office on exposing minority youth to the design profession through Architects in Schools programming, Hip Hop Architecture camps, and Sawhorse Revolution collaborations. Margaret speaks publicly about the power of community engagement and the importance of diversity, and strives to incorporate these themes in all of the work that she does.

Honorary AIA Seattle Membership

Jennifer Guthrie FASLA, PLA

Smiling photo of woman with dark-with-gray hair parted on her right-hand side, wearing a black shirt with white lapel in front of gray, abstracted backgroundJennifer Guthrie is a founding partner of GGN and a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Jennifer’s design leadership merges a guiding, experiential vision with innovative and precise detailing. Her work ranges broadly, encompassing urban districts of green streets and mixed-use housing, public squares, rooftop gardens, urban farms, and cultural institutions. Examples of these diverse project types include the University of Washington’s West Campus Residences & Streetscape, the Lurie Garden at Millennium Park in Chicago, the Spring District in Bellevue, and the Long Beach Civic Center in California.

GGN was the recipient of the 2017 ASLA National Landscape Architecture Firm Award. Additionally, Jennifer and her partners received the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award for Landscape Architecture in 2011. Jennifer’s work has received numerous national and regional Honor Awards from ASLA and AIA. She is a former President of the Landscape Architectural Foundation Board and she currently serves on the CEO Roundtable.

Kristine Kenney ASLA, LEED AP

Smiling, blonde woman with long hair and blue blouse with blue brooch, standing in front of brick wall

University Landscape Architect & Director of Campus Planning + Architecture
University of Washington

Kristine is an accomplished and dedicated steward of the University of Washington campus, where she directs the planning and physical development of the built environment, both inside and out. With a strong commitment to solving complex issues through creative solutions, Kristine is adept at strategically navigating and cultivating cross-functional discourse amongst campus leaders, trade experts, and design professionals to effectively balance limited resources with unlimited ambitions. Throughout her career, she has been recognized by her peers with professional awards commending the positive and inclusive culture she fosters, resulting in high-impact, results-oriented teams. Within the design profession, she has earned great respect for her tenacious advocacy and encouragement to continually strive for design excellence, resulting in numerous project design awards at the University of Washington. One of her proudest accomplishments is the vision and insight she provided over a ten-year timeframe, resulting in the reenvisioned lower Rainer Vista, an iconic and campus-defining landscape. In her free time, Kristine enjoys relishing in the seasonal beauty of the Pacific Northwest, whether that’s getting her hands dirty in the garden or actively immersing herself in nature with family and friends.

Nicole DeNamur WELL AP

Black-and-white portrait of woman with dark, short hair, bangs, and glasses, in a dark, collared shirt and hands in pockets, leaning against a concrete wall in front of trees.

Nicole DeNamur is an attorney, WELL AP and Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, EcoDistricts AP and LEED Green Associate. She helps her clients identify and manage the risks of sustainable innovation so they can do great work without the surprises. Before launching her consulting company – Sustainable Strategies – Nicole practiced construction and insurance coverage law in the Seattle area for more than a decade. She leverages this experience to guide her clients as they pursue robust sustainability goals, and her strength lies in her ability to view sustainability issues through a legal and risk management lens.

Nicole’s work focuses on creating collaborative spaces and uniting diverse groups to mitigate climate change through the built environment. She also specializes in issues related to the intersection of buildings with human health and wellness. Nicole is particularly focused on creating safe, accessible and inclusive spaces that allow all occupants to thrive. In addition to her consulting work, Nicole is an award-winning contributing author and has developed and taught graduate-level courses at the University of Washington and Boston Architectural College.

 

Tory Laughlin-Taylor

Portrait of smiling woman with tight, curly hair and dark glasses, wearing a blue sweater in front of greenery

Tory Laughlin Taylor is a real estate advisor in affordable housing development, engaged in organizations and strategies that leverage values-driven capital to deliver enduring affordability in our Puget Sound communities. For over three decades she has been financing, building and operating multi-family housing for low-income working people, driven by the conviction that economic access to desirable housing is the foundation of a healthy equitable society. In her career she has originated over 1,000 units of permanently affordable housing for people earning about half of median income.

A Seattle native, Tory has a BA from Harvard College and an MBA in Real Estate Finance and Development from George Washington University. She has served on the Seattle Design Commission, the Seattle Housing Levy Oversight Committee, and the Washington State Affordable Housing Advisory Board.

 

 

Community Service Award

Kate Simonen AIA, SE

Smiling studio portrait of woman with short light-brown hair, wearing a blue jacket over a black sweaterKate Simonen, AIA, SE is the executive director of the Carbon Leadership Forum and Professor and Chair of the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington. Connecting significant professional experience in high performance building design and technical expertise in environmental life cycle assessment she works to spur collective action to bring net embodied carbon to zero through cutting-edge research, cross-sector collaboration, and the incubation of new approaches. Kate directs the research of the Carbon Leadership Forum and convenes collaborative initiatives such as the Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (the EC3 tool) and the Structural Engineers 2050 Challenge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allied Organization Award

Sawhorse Revolution

Founded in 2010, Sawhorse Revolution fosters confident, community-oriented youth through the power of carpentry and craft. We are inspired to create equitable change within a framework of “feet-on-the-ground” education and job-training, empowerment, and leadership, in and for our community. Sawhorse programs team teens with professional carpenters and architects to build and design projects that make a real difference in their community. We partner with schools and low-income housing organizations in central and south Seattle to ensure our free programs reach youth furthest from educational justice – so that they can make a real difference in their own neighborhoods. To date, Sawhorse students have built 58 structures, partnered with 100+ community groups, and Sawhorse has served over 800 youth in Central and South Seattle. The structures we build with our students stand as testaments to the long-term benefit of our programs; these projects can be anything from a series of projects built for BIPOC-led food justice organizations, to 25+ tiny homes for the homeless placed in city-sanctioned encampments, to a 225 sq. ft social justice lending library. By responding to a variety of local needs, we give students leadership and agency in their own communities, allowing them to apply their creativity collaboratively to change the worlds around them.

 

NATIONAL HONORS

2021 Young Architect Award

Myer Harrell AIA

2021 Honorary AIA

Vincent Martinez Hon. AIA

2021 AIA College of Fellows

Brian Court FAIA
Grace H. Kim FAIA
Eric Lagerberg FAIA, LEED AP
Erica Loynd FAIA
Richard E. (Rick) Mohler, FAIA, NCARB

View the 2021 Fellows and National Awards announcement for more information.

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

2021 Honor Awards

AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture is a nationally-recognized program that explores and honors projects designed by architects throughout the state of Washington. This annual program provides an important opportunity for the design community to share and celebrate its achievements both among practitioners and with the community at-large. Awarded projects are revealed for the first time at the live event.

Click here for online gallery


2021 HONOR AWARDS ON NOVEMBER 8 AT TOWN HALL SEATTLE

This year’s program on November 8 will return to in-person celebrations of our greater design community, recognizing both project teams and — for the first time — individual awardees. The program consists of two distinct events, connected by the themes of recognition and celebration, both hosted on November 8 at Town Hall Seattle.

Individual Awardees Celebration | Town Hall Seattle’s Forum

  • 4:30pm – Doors Open for Individual Awardees Celebration (Forum Entrance off Seneca St)
    • Bar opens (21+)
  • 5:15pm – Individual Awardees Celebration Begins 
  • 6:30pm – Program Ends
    • Those also attending the Honor Awards Live Event will make their way to the lobby

Click here for more info

Honor Awards Live Event | Town Hall Seattle’s Great Hall

  • 5:30pm – Lobby Opens for Honor Awards (Lobby Entrance off 8th Avenue)
  • 6:15pm – Live Pianist Performance by Jovino Santos Neto Begins in the Great Hall
  • 7:00pm – Honor Awards Program Begins
    • Livestreaming of the Honor Awards Program begins for remote ticket-holders
  • 9:00pm – Program Ends

Click here for more info


THE JURY PROCESS

Jury Deliberations will take place virtually this year. Each juror individually reviews all projects submitted before group deliberations. Over the course of two days (this year online), the jury will agree on criteria and selections for award recognition. Awards are the final determination of the jury.


MEET THE JURY

Katherine Darnstadt AIA, NOMA, LEED AP | Latent Design | Chicago

Katherine Darnstadt is the founder of Latent Design, a progressive architecture and urbanism firm leveraging civic innovation and social impact to design more equitable spaces and systems. Since founding her practice in 2010, Katherine and her firm have prototyped new urban design systems to advance urban agriculture, support small business, created spaces for youth makers, advanced building innovation, and created public space frameworks. She and the firm have been published, exhibited and featured widely, most notably at the International Venice Architecture Biennial, Architizer A+ Awards, Chicago Ideas Week, NPR, American Institute of Architects Young Architects Honor Award winner and Crain’s Chicago 40 Under 40. She currently teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and previously at Northwestern University.

Sharon Johnston FAIA | Johnston Marklee | Los Angeles

Sharon Johnston, FAIA, is founding partner of Los Angeles-based firm Johnston Marklee and Professor in Practice at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Since its establishment in 1998, Johnston Marklee has been recognized internationally with over 50 major awards. Projects by Johnston Marklee span thirteen countries and are diverse in scale and type. Recent projects include the Menil Drawing Institute in Houston; a renovation of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; the new Dropbox global headquarters in San Francisco; and the new UCLA Margo Leavin Graduate Art Studios in Culver City. Publications on the work of the firm include House Is a House Is a House Is a House Is a House (Birkhauser, 2016); 2G N. 67 and El Croquis N. 198. In 2019, Sharon was named Architectural Record’s Women in Architecture: New Generation Leader. Together with partner Mark Lee, Sharon was Co-Artistic Director of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Helena Zambrano AIA, CPHC | Mahlum | Portland

Helena is a licensed architect in the United States and Mexico with over 10 years of national and international experience. She is a Project Architect at Mahlum with a passion for environmental systems, and a strong advocate for the use of evidence to inform design. Emphasizing the design of daylit spaces, Helena’s work has been recognized with local, national, and international design awards. Prior to joining Mahlum, Helena was Sustainability Director at Overland Partners in San Antonio, TX.  She currently serves on the AIA’s National Committee on the Environment, in which capacity she worked to establish the Framework for Design Excellence and led the development of both the “COTE Super Spreadsheet” and the ‘“AIA Common App”, two tools that raise the status of sustainability metrics and reframe the way design awards recognize architecture.


BROADEN CONVERSATIONS ABOUT RESILIENCE IN DESIGN

Every year, jurors praise submissions that reveal the story behind the marketing images. What concepts and considerations drove the design? How did the design team creatively address the project parameters? What is the project’s benefit or impact? Ultimately, what makes this an award-winning project? We encourage submitters to use the project narrative, captions, and the inclusion of process work as opportunities to graphically tell a design story. 

In addition to the jury’s own criteria, the AIA Seattle community has identified four considerations for the submission review process:

  • Inspiration | How does the project manifest its stated intent–in form and function–revealing innovation in both thought and practice?
  • Problem-solving | How does the project creatively address challenges inherent in its site, budget, program, materials, collaboration, and context? What are the organizing principles informing design?
  • Environmental Sensitivity | How does the project exhibit serious intent to minimize negative environmental impact and enhance its relationship to the environment?
  • Social Impact | How does the project enhance the community in which it is situated? How does it help promote a vibrant and equitable community?

Additionally, the Common App offers BUILT project submitters Ten Measures for Design Excellence to consider as you tell your project story. 


YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Initiated in 2018, the Young Voices Selection (YVS) program aims to elevate and engage the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. Three young designers, nominated by firm leaders within AIA Seattle’s Firm Network and selected by the Honor Awards Committee, will be given the opportunity to review, deliberate, and select ONE Built project submission. This chosen project, the “Young Voices Selection,” will be recognized at the Live Event in November and selected by this year’s Young Voices…


QUESTIONS?

Questions about attending the Live Event? Contact AIA Seattle Programs Coordinator, Andrea Aguilera

Questions about the Live Event? Contact AIA Seattle Programs Manger, Zoe Guckenheimer.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Seattle Associate Director, Growth & Operations, Kristen Lound.


THANK YOU TO OUR 2021 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

 

Alaska AirlinesBetterBricks | Dovetail | Hoffman Construction CompanySellen ConstructionUSI Insurance ServicesAHBL  | Berger Partnership | Cary Kopczynski & Company, Inc. | Atlas Supply / Dowsil | Eakman ConstructionFSi EngineersGLY Construction, Inc.Hargis Engineers, Inc. | Inform Interiors | KPFF Consulting Engineers | Lane PowellMagnusson Klemencic AssociatesMalsam Tsang Structural EngineeringMicrosol Resources Corp. | PCL Construction Services, Inc.PCS Structural Solutions | Quantum Consulting Engineers | | RJM Precision Instruments |SchuchartSkanskaSwenson Say Fagét | Thomas Fragnoli ConstructionThornton Tomasetti | GRAY

Posted in For the Profession, Honor Awards, Uncategorized

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: 2021 Northwest Washington Design Awards

Well-lit, beachside home interior with blue sky in background. Purple text band with white font on top reads: Call for Submissions. Purple text band with white font on bottom reads: AIA Northwest Washington. Purple text bubble in bottom-right with gold font reads: 2021 Design Awards

AIA Northwest Washington’s Steering Committee invites you to share your most dynamic, new work!

We invite you to submit to AIA Northwest Washington’s 2021 Design Awards. The intent of the Design Awards is to encourage excellence in architectural design and planning and to provide an avenue through which architects may gain recognition by their peers and the public. The ultimate goal is to raise the standards of architectural design excellence by both the architectural community and the public. We encourage you to join the conversation and tell your design story.


HOW TO SUBMIT

Call for Submissions opens: August 2, 2021
Submission Deadline: DEADLINE EXTENDED to September 9, 2021 5pm PDT.

We invite you to submit to AIA Northwest Washington’s 2021 Design Awards. The intent of the Design Awards is to encourage excellence in architectural design and planning and to provide an avenue through which architects may gain recognition by their peers and the public. The ultimate goal is to raise the standards of architectural design excellence by both the architectural community and the public. We encourage you to join the conversation and tell your design story.

Submission deadline: September 9 at 5:00pm PDT. Finalize and complete payment before this deadline.
Please submit for the following categories:

  • Residential
  • Commercial
  • Unbuilt Project

Submission Fee: $150 for first project submitted, $100 for each additional project. (If submitting multiple projects, submit each project separately.)

Complete this application and upload the four (4) described documents to the below link.
**This application sheet details all submission requirements, and includes a form that you will submit to the below link.

 

White text on red background: click here to submit

**At the discretion of the AIA|NWW Design Awards Committee, late submissions may be accepted after 5:00pm PDT on September 9, and a late submission fee will be applied. No fees will be refunded for submissions that are disqualified or incomplete.


NEW THIS YEAR: 25-YEAR AWARD

The 25-Year Award showcases buildings that set a precedent. The award is conferred on a building that has stood the test of time for 25+ years and continues to set standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance.

Any AIA|NWW member, group of members, or committee may submit their own project(s) or submit by nominating a project by a different architect or firm.

Submission Fee: None

Complete this application for the 25-Year Award and upload the three (3) described documents to the below link.
**This application sheet details all submission requirements, and includes a form that you will submit to the below link.

White text on red background: click here to submit


LIVE EVENT ON OCTOBER 7

The Northwest Washington Design Awards is a marquee program, drawing over 100 attendees and featuring an awards presentation and keynote presentation. Full details on the virtual program can be found here. This program provides an essential occasion for the San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom county architecture community to celebrate its progress and growth within itself, and in conversation with the community at-large.

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QUESTIONS?

Questions about Submitting? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Program Manager, Karen Bacon.

Questions about attending the Virtual Event? Contact AIA Seattle Member Engagement Manager, Connor Descheemaker.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Steering Committee chair, Dave Christensen.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2021 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

blue and black text on white background, with flag-like "F" logo: Freeland & Associates Civil Engineers; www.freelandengineering.com

 

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington

Advocacy Update – July 2021

NATIONAL NEWS

California Gas Ban Lawsuit Dismissed
A federal court in San Francisco dismissed a preemption challenge to the ban on gas hookups in new construction in Berkeley, California. California has more than 40 cities that have implemented gas bans or other restrictions, and this outcome will inform further efforts there and in other states. Seattle attempted a gas ban for new construction in 2019, but the effort, led by former Councilmember Mike O’Brien, was unsuccessful. Seattle’s new energy code does not ban gas but restricts the use of gas (and electric resistance) for space heating and water heating in commercial and taller multifamily buildings. Other gas uses, such as cooking and decorative fireplaces, are not impacted.


STATE NEWS

Stamping Questions Return to the Attorney General
AIA Washington Council submitted formal comments to the Attorney General’s office in response to a request, likely spurred by an engineering firm in the Yakima area, for an official opinion allowing engineers to stamp a full set of drawings, including architecture drawings, that fall outside of the exemptions outlined in state statute. This request was apparently triggered by a separate opinion released by the Attorney General’s office earlier this year, which found that engineers are not allowed to stamp documents that are architectural in nature. (AIA|WA made the request for this opinion.) While local governments allowing engineers to stamp architectural drawings has largely been an issue on the east side of the state, an unfavorable opinion by the Attorney General’s office will impact western Washington as well. Complicating the matter is the fact that state statute does not clearly define engineering or architectural work – rather, it says only that architectural work is work that requires an architect’s education and training, and it provides similar language regarding engineering work. There is no timetable for the Attorney General’s office to respond, and it could take more than a year.

State Begins Outreach to Owners on the Clean Buildings Performance Standard
The Washington State Department of Commerce reminds owners and operators of commercial properties 50,000 sq ft and above to review the list of buildings that are subject to Washington’s Clean Buildings Performance Standard. Building owners should expect to receive a letter later this summer notifying them that their building is likely subject to the standard and providing additional direction on next steps – and they will have questions for their architects. Reporting and compliance requirements are phased in beginning June 2026 based on building size. Owners may be eligible for the state’s Early Adopter Incentive program, regardless of whether they are required to make energy efficiency improvements to comply with the standard or not. The program offers performance-based incentive payments to building owners who get a head start on compliance or who simply choose to make qualifying improvements to their buildings.


LOCAL NEWS

Seattle Approves Policy for Affordable Housing on Property Owned by Religious Organizations – with a Disappointing Change
In compliance with state legislation (HB 1377) passed in 2019, the Seattle City Council passed and Mayor Jenny Durkan signed legislation to allow religious institutions to access additional development capacity when they redevelop their property for long-term rent- and income-restricted affordable housing. The state law requires such projects to target households at a maximum of 80% AMI (area mean income), but it allows local governments to lower that threshold. AIA strongly supported this legislation, but we have concerns about the final version, which was amended to provide development bonuses only to projects at 60% AMI or below.

Donald King FAIA and Renée Chang FAIA have publicly argued that this change eliminates the ability of the Black churches that are working with the Nehemiah Initiative to utilize the program because projects at 60% AMI are so financially perilous that only large developers can secure the major grants and federal tax grants to develop them. AIA is working on a letter to be cosigned by the National Organization of Minority Architects Northwest (NOMA NW) to Mayor Durkan and City Councilmembers echoing these comments and arguing that the final legislation will deny the independent, bottom-up community organizations that have the opportunity to most impact BIPOC lives and communities access to the program that was intended to serve them. AIA is calling on the City Council to recall the legislation and revisit the AMI threshold.

Growth Strategy Racial Equity Toolkit Report Released
In 2019, a budget proviso requested by Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda provided funding for a racial equity toolkit analysis of Seattle’s urban village growth strategy. That report was delayed by the Durkan administration, in part due to COVID. It was finally released this week and was presented to the City Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee by Rico Quirindongo AIA, Director of the Office of Planning and Community Development. You can watch that Council hearing here. The document itself is here. The report will help guide Seattle’s Comprehensive Plan Update that kicks off this year and will inform a deeper analysis of Seattle’s existing urban village growth strategy using the city’s Racial Equity Toolkit. We encourage AIA members to review the report and send any comments to Kirsten – or directly to your Councilmembers.

Renaming Seattle’s Single-Family Zones
In June, City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda announced that the renaming of Seattle’s single-family zoning category to “neighborhood residential” will kick off with a public hearing during the Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee meeting on July 28. AIA Seattle has supported this change because it provides a better reflection of the current make-up of these zones and is an important step in the direction of greater equity among neighborhoods. While this is a small adjustment, it will be important to secure this change as Seattle heads into its major Comprehensive Plan update. Importantly, this proposal will be part of the annual Comprehensive Plan update legislation considered by the Council this year, not the multi-year Comprehensive Plan update that has yet to begin.

Mayor Durkan Proposal to Fill Downtown Storefronts
In June, Mayor Durkan announced legislation to allow additional uses for downtown storefronts in an effort to fill empty spaces and revitalize downtown. The ordinance would be temporary, lasting for 12 months, unless Council extends it. The proposal would expand the uses that would be allowed in these spaces to include bike parking, art installations, gyms, medical offices, museums, and other items not currently allowed under the city’s usage guidelines. The ordinance is not yet scheduled to go before Council. AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board argues that this program should do more to encourage more affordable spaces and should specifically target the BIPOC community. They also question why this change should be temporary. If you have comments to add to the discussion, please let Kirsten know. AIA Seattle will likely send a letter to Mayor Durkan and councilmembers on this topic, and we’d like your feedback.


OPPORTUNITIES

Built Environment Candidate Forums
If you missed our Built Environment Candidate Forums for city of Seattle candidates, you can view the recordings here:

Ballots will be mailed this week and must be mailed back by Aug. 3. Please vote!

Lid I-5 Newsletter
Support Lid-I-5’s campaign for federal funding as part of federal highway mitigation legislation; walk the freeway during Lid I-5’s July 28 tour; read the City of Seattle’s recently-released I-5 Feasibility Study.


EVENTS

Join us at the Seattle Design Festival! Aug. 21-22
The Seattle Design Festival Block Party is a two-day street fair celebrating the powerful ways design affects our lives. This fun outdoor event is an opportunity for the design community and the public to come together and interact through large-scale design installations, performances, and design activities all centered around the Festival’s 2021 theme, EMERGE. Join us Aug. 21-22 at Lake Union Park!

AIA Seattle Advocacy Committee Meetings

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force meets monthly via Zoom on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Housing, Public Policy Board

Letter from Executive Director, Lisa Richmond: Farewell

Lisa Richmond Hon AIA
Dear AIA Seattle Colleagues,

As most of you know, next Wednesday, June 30 is my last day with AIA Seattle, and these final days are bittersweet. I have enjoyed every moment of my time within this community. You have inspired me daily with your commitment to excellence, your passion, your creative ideas and willingness to share them. Thank you for welcoming me into the fold 15 years ago.

AIA Seattle will be announcing a new Executive Director within the next few weeks. I know you will embrace them as a valued member of our AIA family.

The next 12 months will be an exciting time for AIA Seattle. In addition to welcoming a new director, we will see the fruition of plans and changes that have been in the works over the past year. Our Board of Directors is finalizing three new Imperative Statements, formally committing to leadership on Climate, Equity and Housing. We will be implementing a refined brand strategy and more efficient governance model for the Seattle Design Festival, recognizing the power, momentum and recognizability of the festival to the public. And coming out of COVID, the staff is ramping up for in-person programming this fall and a full complement of events, classes, exhibits and advocacy efforts in 2022.

I’m taking a gap year to reflect and renew before stepping into the next chapter of my career. My time will include travel and outdoors adventures, volunteering, education, and maybe even some continuing connection with AIA. If you’d like to keep in touch, you can also find me on Linkedin.

All the best to you, and thank you for giving me the opportunity to call AIA Seattle home.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond Hon. AIA
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Posted in Committees, Design In Public, For the Profession, For the Public