Join Us For 15-Minute Seattle: Creating Livable Places for All

Want to learn more about the 15-minute city concept? Visit the 15-Minute City Resources Page!


UPCOMING PROGRAMS

Housing Innovation in the 15-Minute City 

Kristian Skovbakke Villadsen’s 15-Minute Cities for People

Monday, June 7 | 10:30 – 11:30am PT | Opening Keynote

Housing Density in the 15-Minute City: Policy and Purpose

Tuesday, June 8 | 10:30am – 12:30pm PT | Panel Discussion

Join us June 7-8 for the series kick-off event, Housing Innovation in the 15-Minute City, to examine the concept of complete neighborhoods as an urban design framework and explore how Seattle can support full-service neighborhoods by providing a mix of housing options for homeowners, renters, and people of different ages and walks of life. Registration includes continuing education credit (Full Program: 3 AIA LU HSW; Keynote-Only: 1 AIA LU HSW).

Click here for more info

Designing for Dignity: Rethinking Our Role in Solving Seattle’s Homelessness & Housing Crisis

Thursday, June 17 | 4:00 – 5:30pm PT | Presentation and Group Discussion

Elizabeth Mahan, the winner of the 2018-2019 IIDA (International Interior Design Association) Northern Pacific Chapter’s Spencer de Mille Traveling Fellowship, presents her research on the impact of design on homelessness abroad. Her work explores how design choices impact the housing retention rates of formerly homeless individuals and families and supports the restoration of their dignity. 

Click here for more info

Additional programming coming soon! All sessions and speakers subject to change.


Questions?
Contact Kirsten Smith, Manager of Policy and Advocacy at AIA Seattle

Posted in Advocacy, For the Profession, For the Public, Housing, Urban Design Forum

Advocacy Update – April 2021

Schemata Capitol Hill TOD rendering

NATIONAL NEWS

Housing Supply & Affordability Act
In Congress, Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota introduced the Housing Supply and Affordability Act to encourage cities and rural communities to lift barriers to new housing construction. The bipartisan bill would authorize $1.5 billion for federal grants to local governments that commit to increasing their supply of local housing. Eligible local governments will be able to apply for grants to build out housing policy plans, or local roadmaps, that will identify a pathway to creating greater housing affordability and availability. AIA National has endorsed the legislation. Legislation enacted in Washington in 2019 (by Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon, D-West Seattle) has been successful in providing similar local government funding to boost planning around increased housing capacity.


STATE NEWS

State Legislative Session Nears April 25 Adjournment
With a week and a half to go in the legislative session, bills that have not passed both the House and the Senate are dead for the year (all dead bills will return in 2022). There is an exception for any bill necessary to implement the budget, and the remaining days will be spent by legislators out of public view, negotiating the final Operating, Capital, and Transportation budgets. Although not finalized, the Capital Budget will be the largest ever produced by the state.

You can read AIA Washington Council’s March legislative report here. You can also follow along at AIA|WA’s Legislative Center. Highlights since our last report include:

Climate: HB 1050 to further reduce emissions from HFCs passed both the House and the Senate and is awaiting signature by Governor Inslee; HB 1280 to require large public buildings to undergo all-electric analysis in the planning phase passed the House but did not make it to consideration on the Senate floor and is dead until next year; SB 5141, to add environmental justice requirements to state agency decision making processes, passed both houses and is headed to the governor.

Tax: legislation to implement a capital gains tax passed the Senate and is currently in the House Finance Committee (this bill is budget-related and the normal deadlines do not apply). This remains the only major tax bill that is likely to advance this year, as both the House and Senate Operating budgets (controlled by the Democrats) are tied to a capital gains bill passing.

Growth Management: legislation (HB 1220) to add more robust housing elements to the Growth Management Act, requiring planning for a wide range of housing needs, including homeless housing, passed both houses and will go to the governor. HB 1099, to add a new climate element to the GMA, including a focus on reducing single-occupancy vehicle trips, died twice after a last-ditch effort to add it to a separate bill that was moving. AIA|WA supported both bills, and we will work with stakeholders to get HB 1099 passed next year.

Housing: unlike last year, most bills related to encouraging greater housing availability did not survive this year. One that did, SB 5235, would prohibit owner-occupancy requirements for lots with an ADU and ban local limits on the number of persons who can reside in a home beyond state law. That bill has been sent to the governor. Two housing financing bills, HB 1070 to allow the use of local tax revenue for affordable housing and related services to include the acquisition and construction of affordable housing and facilities; and HB 1189, to authorize tax increment financing for local governments, are on their way to the governor. HB 1277 would create a permanent state-funded rental assistance and housing stability program with a new $100 document recording fee on real estate-related transactions; it passed the House but, because it is budget-related, it has more time to pass the Senate.

Race & Social Justice: a key priority of Democratic leadership, a significant number of criminal justice and police reform bills passed the legislature this year. These include legislation to prohibit private detention facilities; restore voting rights to individuals with felony convictions who have completed their post-sentence requirements; provide greater state oversight over use-of-force incidents; require police officers to intervene when a colleague uses excessive force; and more. You can see the full list on AIA’s bill tracking matrix.

For more information, contact Kirsten. You may view AIA’s bill tracking matrix here.


LOCAL NEWS

King County Commercial Energy Code Update
Following the successful adoption of Seattle’s commercial energy code update, King County is proposing similar improvements to its commercial energy code, which covers unincorporated parts of the county. Draft codes, including a plain-language summary of the proposed updates, can be found on the King County website. If you would like to comment on any part of the proposed code, send your comments to permittinglegislation@kingcounty.gov by April 30.

Light Rail Station Neighborhood Designs Released
Seattle’s Office of Planning and Community Development released a draft plan for the neighborhoods surrounding the future light rail station areas at 130th and 145th streets in north Seattle. They are seeking public feedback via an online open house and survey – responses must be filed by April 16. AIA has worked to support policies that encourage denser housing opportunities around transit stations – the city’s draft plan has been criticized for providing lackluster housing density in station neighborhoods. We will be monitoring the progress of these plans as they develop and provide comments where appropriate.

Charter Amendment on Homelessness Filed
Compassion Seattle, a group of non-profits, business organizations, and community organizations ranging from the Downtown Seattle Association to the Downtown Emergency Services Center and the Housing Development Consortium, filed a city of Seattle charter amendment that would mandate a comprehensive strategy of housing, services, and clearance resources to address Seattle’s homelessness crisis. It would also mandate sweeps of homeless encampments on public property. Critically, the amendment fails to identify sources of funding for the services and housing it would offer. The measure will require 33,000 signatures from Seattle voters to qualify for inclusion on the November ballot. AIA Seattle would likely not take a position on the initiative prior to it reaching the ballot, but AIA’s Committee on Homelessness will be leading that discussion. Everyone is welcome to attend COHO meetings on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at noon. More info here.


OPPORTUNITIES

Built Environment Candidate Forums
Along with ULI, ASLA, and others, AIA Seattle will be hosting two city of Seattle candidate forums on built environment issues in June/July. One forum each will be dedicated to the mayoral race and the council races for positions 8 and 9. If you are interested in helping design the forums, please contact Kirsten.

15-Minute Seattle Series
AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force is developing 15-Minute Seattle: Creating Livable Places for All, a series of programs that will kick off in June. The series will present a comprehensive look at how Seattle can become a city of complete neighborhoods where residents can work, shop, access services, and socialize – all within a short walk from their homes. The Housing Task Force will present the featured event, Housing Innovation in the 15-Minute City, with a keynote by Kristian Skovbakke Villadsen of Gehl in Copenhagen and a separate panel discussion on housing policy that supports the population needed for 15-minute city neighborhoods. We are looking for AIA committees and partner organizations that are interested in providing complementary programming under the 15-Minute Seattle banner (think: other amenities and characteristics of the 15-minute city, like walkability, child care, access to food options, etc.). For more information, please contact Kirsten.

Next to Lead Leadership Training
Next to Lead, a new AIA National leadership training program for ethnically diverse women in architecture, is looking for candidates who are AIA members with at least 5 years of experience in architecture (you do not have to be licensed) for its pilot cohort. This 2-year program is designed to teach essential leadership skills alongside successful, diverse women leaders with decades of experience. It includes a one-year leadership impact residency – a volunteer leadership opportunity within AIA where participants will serve on a collaborative project developed with a local or state component or with the AIA. Applications are due April 30. AIA Washington Council will pay the participant cost for any AIA member from Washington selected for the program. 

Seattle Comprehensive Plan 2024
This fall, Seattle will begin its process of developing the city’s 2024 Comprehensive Plan under the state’s Growth Management Act (GMA), which requires most counties and cities in the state to prepare comprehensive plans that show how they will manage population growth over the following two decades. The GMA defines a set of goals for managing growth and lays out the basic contents of comprehensive plans. But Seattle will have a significant opportunity to craft the scope and content of its plan, and that process will be open to public input throughout the plan’s development cycle. Seattle’s Office of Planning and Community Development will begin the scoping process, and AIA Seattle will be offering programming to get architects and members of the public prepared to participate. If you are interested in helping with this effort, please let Kirsten know.

New WA Energy Code Trainings
The 2018 Washington State Energy Code went into effect February 1, 2021. BetterBuiltNW has produced a series of on-demand training videos, Chasing Opportunities in the Washington Energy Code. The videos take a deep dive into the new requirements, focusing on the following:

  • Efficient Building Envelope Options
  • Build Tight & Ventilate Right
  • H/AC System Inside Options

Watch the videos anytime on BetterBuiltNW’s Youtube Channel. For additional training opportunities on WSEC-R, visit the WSU Energy Program website.

NCARB Committees
The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) is accepting applications for volunteers to serve on committees from July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022. More information about NCARB committees can be found here. Applications are available here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

Carbon Leadership Forum Building Reuse Webinar – April 16, 9-10 am
Join the CLF with guest speakers Larry Strain, Donald King FAIA, and Kristian Kicinski to discuss building reuse. The group will address embodied vs. operational carbon for new and renovated buildings, as well as the community considerations related to these development decisions. Register

Northwest Green Home Virtual Tour – May 1, 8, 15
The Northwest Green Home Tour is the Northwest EcoBuilding Guild’s annual educational event that showcases local, sustainable, and green new homes, remodels, and energy retrofits in the Puget Sound area. Sites are still being accepted for the virtual tour.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Culture Change in Practice: A Leadership Cohort

Culture Change Leadership Cohort graphic

This four-part, peer-based learning program was designed by a team of architects and allied professionals over the past nine months to specifically provide architecture and allied firms the tools and community to meet the explicit goals and metrics laid out in NOMA NW’s Call-to-Action.

The architectural profession is still predominantly white and predominantly male. Of the AIA Seattle’s over 2,600 members, just 33 are African American, and 4 are Indigenous American, while only 31% are women according to AIA members’ self-reported data. Creating culture change within architecture firms is a critical step to creating a more diverse and equitable profession. And through this professional change, AIA Seattle hopes to influence broader cultural change, due to the unique role of architects in crafting our physical environment.

This program builds off AIA Seattle’s Intercultural Leadership Program and Conversations Toward A More Equitable Practice series in 2019, and is part of our Racial Justice Commitments, enumerated following the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Manuel Ellis, Ahmaud Arbery, and numerous others in 2020 and our local Racial Justice Town Hall in June. In the wake of a spring of anti-AAPI violence and a deeply embedded set of built environment-centric challenges, AIA Seattle is using this program as another opportunity to equip ourselves and our members to learn how to be antiracist, and build more equitable relationships in our firms, and in the projects and communities we serve.


TARGET PARTICIPANTS – FIRM LEADERS

We invite a dedicated cohort of 40 firm leaders who have committed to, or are considering, the NOMA NW Call-to-Action Pledge. This peer-to-peer learning cohort, facilitated by Dr. Anu Taranath, will support firms’ ability to live up to the goals of the pledge and equip leaders to catalyze change outward in their own firms.

  • (40) Firm Leaders: lead firms, lead practice groups, lead teams, are direct supervisors, make key decisions and have significant influence and power in shaping the culture and staffing of the firm or projects i.e Principals, Partners, Owners – with the intent of facilitating broader impact within their firms and industry

Space is limited to 40 total registrants. At this time, we request that no more than two (2) individuals per firm participate. 


FULL SERIES COST

PLEASE NOTE: Each registration confirms a spot for one individual based on the size of their firm. Up to two (2) individuals per firm may participate. 

$350  1-7 Employees (firm size)
$800  8-49 Employees (firm size)
$1200  50+ Employees (firm size)
$1200  CAP Sponsors

Click here to register - white text on red button

Registration Deadline: Thursday, May 21, 5:00pm PT. All sessions and speakers subject to change.

Registration includes all four courses in the series. Individual course registration is not available. All registration questions can be directed to Zoe Guckenheimer

In recognition that this fee may present a hardship to some firms who are nevertheless committed to investing in the work, limited reduced rate options are available on a first come, first serve basis (priority given to AIA members). Please submit the Scholarship / Reduced Rate Request Form via email by Friday, May 14, 5:00pm PT.  


COMMITMENT + SCHEDULE

Series registrants commit to participate in all four courses, understanding that the content will be designed sequentially for cohort-based learning. 

Session 1 | Monday, May 24, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

Session 2 | Monday, June 21, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

Session 3 | Monday, October 4, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

Session 4 | Monday, December 6, 9:00am-12:00pm PT 

Guiding questions and readings will be sent to participants prior to, and following, each session.


MEET THE FACILITATOR

Dr. Anu Taranath, Dr. Anu Consulting: dialogues for justice | Dr. Anu Taranath brings both passion and expertise to her work as a speaker, facilitator, author and educator. A University of Washington professor for the past 20 years, she teaches about race, gender, equity, and global literatures. As a DEI and racial equity consultant, she offers coaching, training, facilitation and other types of partnerships. Her book Beyond Guilt Trips: Mindful Travel in an Unequal World was named a Finalist for four book awards including the Washington State Book Award. Included in Fodor’s Travel’s “13 Books to Inspire Your Travels” and Oprah Magazine’s “Best 26 Travel Books of All Times,” Dr. Anu and her book have been profiled in YES!, AFAR, Bitch, Mindful and National Geographic magazines. Please visit www.anutaranath.com for more on Dr. Anu and her work.

 


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR FIRM LEADERSHIP TRAINING SPONSORS

ARUP | Betts, Patterson & Mines P.S. | Coughlin Porter Lundeen | FSi Engineers | AP Design Professionals

 


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PLANNING TEAM

Whitney Lewis, Assoc. AIA, Diversity Roundtable/GGLO | Jennie C. Li, Planning in Color | Meredith Everist AIA, Baylis Architects/AIA Seattle Board Past President | Marijana Misic AIA, Mahlum Architects | Simba Mafundikwa Assoc. AIA, GGLO/NOMA NW | Michael Bryant, Mithun Architects/NOMA NW | Veronica Barrow Assoc. AIA, Veronica Barrow Design/NOMA NW | Richard Murray, Diversity Roundtable/Planning In Color | Patreese Martin AIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson | Susan Frieson AIA, NOMA NW/Weber Thompson | Genevieve MacNeil Assoc. AIA, Gensler | Kristen Riley Assoc. AIA, LMN Architects | Mathew Albores AIA, The Miller Hull Partnership | Mark Chubb Assoc. AIA, Code Unlimited


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Zoe Guckenheimer, Program & Event Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Connor Descheemaker, Member Engagement Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Kristen Lound, Associate Director of Growth & Operations at AIA Seattle

Posted in Uncategorized

2021 Northwest Washington Section Scholarship

AIA Northwest Washington - A Section of AIA Seattle

AIA Northwest Washington Section is proud to offer its annual scholarship fund, designed to encourage and assist local residents pursuing a degree in architecture. The scholarship is open to students (inclusive of those with immediately family) from Whatcom, Skagit, Island, and San Juan counties currently enrolled in an accredited school of architecture, regardless of location. The scholarship is awarded to 2-3 applicants per year, for up to $5000 in funds raised by the annual AIA Northwest Washington/Associated General Contractors of Washington Scholarship Golf Tournament.

Applications for the scholarship are due at 5pm 0n Wednesday, June 30 to the Section’s staff contact, Connor Descheemaker. Complete application and submission details here.

Learn more about the AIA Northwest Washington section and get engaged here.

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington

Advocacy Update – March 2021

Washington State Capitol

NATIONAL NEWS

Biden Reverses Trump’s Classical Architecture Order
In February, President Joe Biden reversed Former President Donald Trump’s move to preference classical architecture in federal buildings as part of the new administration’s review of Trump-era executive orders. Under former President Trump’s executive order, government agencies could mandate an architectural style preference for federal courthouses and other federal buildings. It also promoted “classical” and “traditional” architecture above other designs and required extensive justification to use other styles. AIA National worked to stop the order for more than a year. “By overturning this order, the Biden Administration has restored communities with the freedom of design choice that is essential to designing federal buildings that best serve the public,” said AIA 2021 President Peter Exley FAIA in AIA National’s statement.


STATE NEWS

State Legislative Session Passes the Halfway Mark
We are more than halfway through Washington’s 2021 state legislative session; bills that have not passed out of their house of origin (except for bills necessary to implement the budget) are dead for the year. You can read AIA Washington Council’s February legislative report here. You can also follow along at AIA|WA’s Legislative Center. Highlights for AIA thus far include:

  • Practice: alternative project delivery reauthorization for state contracting continues to move towards enactment. AIA-opposed bills to weaken both professional licensing and local governments’ ability to review architectural and engineering plans have died.
  • Climate: AIA’s priority bill to promote building electrification failed to win enough support among Democrats and is dead for 2021; AIA will work with stakeholders on this bill over the summer and fall to be ready to move it forward in 2022. Embodied carbon legislation also died, but a pilot program may be resurrected in the budget negotiations at the end of the session. Bills that continue to move include HB 1050, reducing emissions from hydroflourocarbons; HB 1184, water quality standards for greywater systems; and SB 5141, environmental justice.
  • School construction: once again, bills to amend Washington’s constitution to lower the threshold for voters to pass school bonds for new construction failed to move forward.
  • Tax: legislation to implement a capital gains tax passed the Senate and is currently in the House. This is the only major tax bill that is likely to advance this year.
  • Growth management: legislation to add climate, equity, and more robust housing elements to the existing planning requirements under the Growth Management Act (HB 1099 and HB 1220) passed the House and are currently being considered in the Senate.
  • Housing: unlike last year, most bills related to encouraging greater housing availability did not survive the house of origin cut-off. One that did, SB 5235, would prohibit owner-occupancy requirements for lots with an ADU and ban local limits on the number of persons who can reside in a home beyond state law. That bill is pending in the House. AIA is also tracking bills that add additional funding mechanisms for local governments to pay for affordable housing.
  • Social justice: AIA is tracking a large number of bills on renter’s rights, criminal justice, legal reforms, and additional equity-related measures and encouraging members to weigh in with their legislators on bills that are important to you. These bills –particularly criminal justice reform – have been prioritized by Democratic leadership. You can see the full list on AIA’s bill tracking matrix.

You may view AIA’s bill tracking matrix found here (‘AIA’s bill tracker’ under Tools).
For more information, contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

Democracy Vouchers Available for Seattle Elections
Seattle residents should have received your four Democracy Vouchers for the 2021 campaign season. Hard copies were mailed in early February. If you signed up for online vouchers in 2019, you will not receive hard copy vouchers but should have received an email from the city linking to the online system. The vouchers are worth $25 each and can be signed over to individual candidates for Seattle mayor, city council, and city attorney anytime through November. Campaigns turn the vouchers over to the city for reimbursement. Seattle residents can send their vouchers to any qualified campaigns they choose for the primary or the general election. However, be aware that campaigns can max out on Democracy Voucher money before the end of election season. More info on how to use your vouchers is available here.

Seattle Comprehensive Plan 2024
This summer, Seattle will begin its process of developing the city’s 2024 Comprehensive Plan under the state’s Growth Management Act (GMA), which requires most counties and cities in the state to prepare comprehensive plans that show how they will manage population over the following two decades. The GMA defines a set of goals for managing growth and lays out the basic contents of comprehensive plans. But Seattle will have significant opportunity to craft the scope and content of its plan, and that process will be open to public input throughout the plan’s development cycle. Seattle’s Office of Planning and Community Development will begin the scoping process this July, and AIA Seattle will be offering programming to get architects and members of the public prepared to participate. If you are interested in helping with this effort, please let Kirsten know.

15-Minute Seattle Series
AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force is developing 15-Minute Seattle: Creating Livable Places for All, a series of programs that will kick off in June. The series will present a comprehensive look at how Seattle can become a 15-minute city where residents can work, shop, access services, and socialize – all within a short walk from their homes. The Housing Task Force will present the featured event on housing innovation in the 15-minute city with a keynote by Kristian Skovbakke Villadsen of Gehl in Copenhagen. Using the concept of complete neighborhoods as a framework, we will explore how Seattle can provide a mix of housing options for homeowners, renters, and people of different ages and walks of life. We are looking for AIA committees and partner organizations that are interested in providing complementary programming under the 15-Minute Seattle banner (think: other amenities and characteristics of the 15-minute city, like walkability, transit, green spaces and public spaces, child care, access to food options, etc.). For more information, please contact Kirsten.


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Pedestrian Advisory Board
The Seattle Pedestrian Advisory Board is seeking two new members to serve two-year terms starting this spring. The Pedestrian Advisory Board advises the Mayor, City Council, and city departments on projects, policies, and programs that improve or affect walking and rolling conditions in Seattle. Members also serve as stewards of Seattle’s Pedestrian Master Plan vision. More info available here. Applications are due March 23.

Seattle Renters’ Commission
The City of Seattle is seeking community members to serve on the Seattle Renters’ Commission (SRC). The Seattle Renters’ Commission advises the City on policies and issues of interest to renters citywide. Members of the Seattle Renters’ Commission must be a renter within the City of Seattle at the time of their appointment and throughout their term. The Commission consists of people living in an array of rental housing types, to include students, low-income renters, LGBTQ renters, people with past felony convictions, people in subsidized housing, and those who have experienced homelessness. Those interested in being considered should complete the online application by Monday, April 12 at 5 p.m.

Washington State Board for Architects
The Washington State Board for Architects will have a Board Member position available starting in June 2021. The seven-member, governor-appointed board is made up of six registered architects who reside in Washington and have at least eight years’ experience in responsible charge of architectural work or teaching – and one member of the public. The Board’s primary function is to protect the public’s health, safety, and welfare through regulating the practice of architecture. Board member responsibilities include:

  • Attending board meetings (approx. 4 a year)
  • Participating in board committees for specific projects
  • Acting as a case manager or as part of the judicial panel in disciplinary cases
  • Representing the board responsibly to the profession and the public
  • Attending national council meetings as needed
  • Reviewing applications as needed

This is a fantastic opportunity for someone looking to participate in shaping the profession; women and architects of color are encouraged to apply. More information about this position is available here. Applications should be submitted by April 15.

NCARB Committees
The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) is accepting applications for volunteers to serve on committees for July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022. More information about NCARB committees can be found here. Applications are available here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

Post-COVID Urbanism by AIA’s Urban Design Forum     March 24
This roundtable event provides a platform to discuss opportunities and challenges regarding the tactical urbanism measures Seattle has implemented to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on our communities. As we prepare for a future beyond the pandemic, we ask, “What is  Post-COVID Urbanism?” How do we maintain a safe, healthy environment that provides a connected system of neighborhoods and that brings economic viability equitably to all businesses? More info

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Letter from Executive Director, Lisa Richmond: Transition

Lisa Richmond Hon AIA

Dear AIA Seattle Community,

I am writing to share some bittersweet news. After 14 wonderful years with AIA Seattle, I will be stepping down as Executive Director at the end of June. After so many fulfilling years in this role, I plan on taking a gap year to spend time with family, travel, and explore new ideas.

Working with AIA Seattle has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. We have accomplished so much together: successfully advocating for local policy change to promote an equitable, well designed, and sustainable city; creating the Seattle Design Festival and the Center for Architecture and Design; leading the Institute through national education programs like AIA+2030 and Materials Matter; and elevating the ideas and interests of AIA members through myriad committees and events.

AIA Seattle is a collective endeavor, the sum of the energy and passion of engaged members, committed leaders and capable staff. Its success is not dependent on any one individual. AIA Seattle will continue to thrive and grow, dedicated to the mission to champion the central role of architects in creating and sustaining a better built environment. The Board of Directors is actively working with an executive search firm and will soon be sharing more information about an executive director hiring process.

I remain totally invested in AIA Seattle’s success, and plan to set your new director up for success. Our whole team is committed to a smooth, successful, and transparent transition process. Look for more information about the hiring process and farewell events in coming weeks.

It has been my great honor and pleasure to serve as your Executive Director, and I will take with me not only pride in the work we have done together, but also the warmth of the relationships we have forged. Thank you for giving me this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Posted in Committees, Design In Public, For the Profession, For the Public

AHC: Call for Spring 2021 Conference Lightning Talks

White text on purple background: Architecture for Health Committee

Call for Lighting Talk Presentations

AHC Spring Conference: Resiliency Through Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health
April 22 & 23, 2021 – Virtual

OVERVIEW

This year’s AIA AHC Spring Event includes two days of virtual interdisciplinary presentations, design case studies, and conversations around how we can address design and construction resiliency, while maintaining an ever-present focus on emotional well-being and mental health for all occupants. How we can overcome obstacles and challenges that prevent us from truly wholistic and resilient design in healthcare environments? How do we measure the environmental, economic, and psychological value of regulation, manage risk, and keep humans at the center of design? On April 22nd and 23rd we welcome AEC and healthcare professionals to join us at this dynamic program.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

The AHC Spring Event audience includes: Architects, Designers, Engineers, Contractors, Healthcare Practitioners and Policymakers, Facility Owners/Managers, Urban Designers and Planners, and Public Health Professionals. The planning task force welcomes emerging professionals to the program, as their partnership is central to defining a sustainable future.

CALL FOR LIGHTNING TALK PRESENTATIONS

Submission Deadline: March 17, 2021 

We seek to convene a series of short “lightning” talk presentations (think PechaKucha format) that will deepen the audience’s understanding of current research and design innovations driving towards a focus on:

  • Community
  • Mental health
  • Well-being
  • Jobsite Safety
  • Resiliency
  • Wholistic healthcare environments

Lightning Talks are an opportunity to share ideas and concepts under development and pushing the bounds of convention. We welcome a diversity of proposals from a variety of disciplines deploying design thinking to build a brighter future and strongly encourage emerging professionals and young designers to propose.

PRESENTATION TOPICS

Proposals should specifically address innovation in the context of healthcare or healthcare environments. Possible subtopics are included below, but the list is not comprehensive, and should not limit submitters.

  • Innovative planning or design strategies that improve health outcomes.
  • Processes or techniques that integrate disaster preparedness into design (eg. wildfire, earthquakes, active shooter, pandemic).
  • Implementation of innovative techniques or technologies for jobsite and occupant safety.
  • Methodologies for measuring and monitoring care during construction.
  • Integrating mental health of patient care providers in design.
  • Aging infrastructure, system redundancy, and the level of resiliency required.
  • Integrating wellness technology into patient care and staff care.
  • Systems solutions addressing present and future pandemic preparedness and vaccine distribution.

PRESENTATION FORMAT

Lightning talk presentations are short, and should be no more than seven (7) minutes in length. Inspired by PechaKucha’s concise format, presentations must limit their slides (number of slides may vary), and set them to advance automatically.

Standard audio, visual, and digital media will be supported.

Presenters must submit their final PowerPoint presentation files to AHC no later than 5:00pm PST on Thursday, April 15th. A PowerPoint template will be provided in advance, and late presentations will not be accepted.

We encourage presenters to use the following questions as a guide to preparing their short talks:

  • WHAT is the INNOVATION that your lightning talk will focus on? Is it a process, a tool, a product, a space, an interaction, etc.?
  • WHY the innovation? Identify the problem or challenge that prompted the innovation.
  • HOW was the innovation developed, tested, implemented in the context of healthcare environments?
  • WHO were the stakeholders in research, funding, implementation, etc.? Who was impacted by the innovation? Who was required to embrace the change and/or assume the risks?

EVALUATION CRITERIA AND SELECTION PROCESS

Lightning talk proposals will be evaluated by the AIA Seattle AHC Board Members with AIA staff. Successful proposals will:

  • Align with the event theme and objectives
  • Deepen audience understanding of a particular design innovation
  • Offer fresh insight and relevant information through the combination of words and visuals

Speakers should be able to effectively communicate messages to a variety of audience members. While relevant examples of innovation projects can be used for presentation (and credit given to the appropriate individuals/teams), the lightning talk sessions are not a platform for marketing a person or firm’s portfolio, services, or, strategies. Preference will be given to proposals by emerging professionals and young designers.

SUBMISSION PROCESS + KEY DATES

Please complete the submission form linked below by 5:00pm on March 17, 2021. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Click here to submit

Schedule and Deadlines

  • March 4, 2021: Call for lightning talks goes out
  • March 17, 2021: Proposals due
  • April 1, 2021: Acceptances issued
  • April 15, 2021: Final PowerPoint presentations due to AHC Committee
  • April 22 or 23, 2021: Presentations at 2021 AIA AHC Spring Event: Resiliency Through Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health 8am – 12pm both days. NOTE: Exact date and time of presentation TBD pending finalization of conference schedule.

Registration

Free registration is offered to all presenters who want to attend the full 2-day AIA AHC Spring Event. Please be advised that presenters will be responsible for their travel, lodging and any other expenses and arrangements.

Inquiries

Please address any questions to:

Architecture for Health Committee
Spring Event Committee
AHCchairs@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Architects, Architecture for Health Committee, Committees, For the Profession

THE STATE OF HIGHER EDUCATION – A LOOK AT TODAY & TOMORROW

White background, with red-to-blue gradient image of small group, duo, and independent education images with VR and computers. Text: The State of Higher Education; A look at Today and Tomorrow; A panel discussion of what is working, what's not, and what to try next. Wednesday, January 20th, 12-1pm PST

While the pandemic shone a spotlight on the vulnerabilities that have plagued higher education, it also represents an opportunity to improve the system holistically. As an extension of DLR Group’s ongoing research into The Evolution of CampusSM, Jackie Eckhardt moderates this Jan 20th discussion touching on aspects of the current realities facing local institutions including panelists’ perspectives from Bellevue College, Central Washington University, and Washington State University-TriCities.

Click here to view a full recording of the live webinar.

 

MODERATOR

Jackie Eckhardt, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | Higher Education Leader | DLR Group

PANELISTS

Christopher Butler, JD, BA-ID | Planning and Design Manager | Bellevue College
Delano Palmer | Director of Capital Planning & Projects | Central Washington University
Ray White | Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration | Washington State University

 

Posted in Committee for Architect for Education, Committees Tagged with: , , , ,

AIA Seattle Announces 2021 Fellows & National Awards

2021 AIA Seattle Fellows and National Awardees collage

Man in light-grey collared short, with parted hair, looking ahead in front of soft-focus industrial background

Brian Court FAIA has brought sustainable design to the forefront of the public realm with his performance-driven design process that works in harmony with natural forces, shaping our environment and establishing a low-impact, regenerative future. Since joining Miller Hull in 2001, Brian has led the design of numerous high profile and complex landmark projects using a deft combination of time-tested and innovative design strategies and emerging technologies. This has earned him the reputation as an advocate for groundbreaking sustainable design.

Brian has a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Washington and continues to give back to the program as a guest reviewer and thesis critic. Pushing the boundaries of current practice make him a highly sought-after speaker and instructor who regularly shares his insight and experience with other designers and students. Additionally, Brian was honored with the distinguished and singular Young Architect Award by AIA Seattle in 2013.

Smiling woman with black, long hair, wearing a striped blue sweater in front of flat-blue background

Grace H. Kim FAIA is an architect and co-founding principal of Schemata Workshop, a Seattle-based architectural practice with a keen focus on building community and social equity. Her clients include a range of public housing authorities and social service providers, as well as municipalities and private clients. Her work is deeply rooted in race, equity and inclusion – and she seeks to include the voices and cultures of people of color and marginalized populations through her projects.

Grace is also the founder of Capitol Hill Urban Cohousing, a collaborative residential community which includes her street level office and a rooftop urban farm.  She walks the talk of sustainability – leaving a small ecological footprint while incorporating holistic ideals of social and economic resilience into her daily life.  She is an internationally recognized expert in cohousing – her TED talk has over 2.4M views.

Grace serves on the Seattle Planning Commission and on the Board of Directors for the Housing Development Consortium – a membership organization that advocates for housing policy at the local and state levels.

Smiling man in jacket over collared red shirt, smiling and glancing to his left, away from camera. Standing in front of a grey background, with orange, die-cut overlap

Eric Lagerberg FAIA, LEED AP has led a career of nearly 30 years, emerging as a global guiding force in the design of retail and consumer-focused environments. A consummate leader, Eric brings the unique perspective of a professional who has worked and lived around the world—as a designer as well as a client. This broad view allows him to see the work from all aspects and to drive solutions that accommodate operational considerations without compromising design.

Lagerberg’s professional experience includes leadership positions at, among others, Starbucks, Callison and CRTKL, the global architecture, design and planning firm. At CRTKL, he directed the efforts of nearly 400 creative professionals across 22 offices internationally. Under his leadership, the practice developed an award-winning portfolio of work for some of the world’s most recognizable (and demanding) brands and retailers. With Eric at the helm of its retail team, CRTKL consistently ranked as the top retail design firm in the world.

A passionate but diligent ambassador for the profession, Eric has taken a global path in his career. In the late 1990’s, he relocated from Seattle to London and, eventually, to Beijing to work with Western retailers expanding into emerging markets—an assignment that tested his skills as an architect as much as a diplomat. Eric’s commitment to quality design, business integrity and client service proved to be invaluable in helping American commercial interests break into what many had considered an impenetrable market. And, in the spirit of a true educator, he wasted no time in sharing his knowledge through lectures, articles and talks that encouraged colleagues, peers and even competitors to test their limits and push boundaries.

Eric received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Architecture from the University of Washington and a Master of Architecture degree from The Ohio State University. He currently lives in Seattle with his wife Park.

Smiling woman with black hair and blue-rimmed glasses, smiling. She is seated on a blue chair, leaning forward, wearing a blue, patterned sweater over a white shirt, in front of an industrial-modern office in soft focusDLR Group Principal Erica Loynd FAIA is a national justice design expert leading teams to elevate conditions for disenfranchised people, creating environments and setting innovative justice standards that support wellness, equity, & transformative programs to successfully return people to their communities. Erica engages clients and organizations to empower change from the top down, addressing physical and operational policies and practices related to mental health, programs, medical treatment, enhanced physical environments, safety for inmates, public, staff, and officers. Her projects have led to $1.7 billion dollars of construction for justice and civic projects and over 5.25 million total square feet of space. Volunteering with AIA WA Council as the state licensure advisor, AIA Seattle’s mentorship programs and membership steering committee, she has worked with architects and aspiring candidates to enrich their careers in architecture. As an expert in government facility design and construction, Erica has been leading the national AIA Academy of Architecture for Justice Knowledge Community to push for innovations in research and operations to better serve all people.

Smiling man with gray hair, standing slightly leaning to his right. He is wearing a light-blue dress shirt, standing against a white wall.

Richard E (Rick) Mohler, FAIA, NCARB is an Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Washington College of Built Environments with over thirty-five years of professional practice garnering more than a dozen local and regional AIA awards and multiple design competition wins. His teaching, research, practice and advocacy are focused on the nexus of urban housing, transportation and the public realm and he leverages his teaching to address these issues while strengthening connections between the profession, academy, government and community. Rick co-chaired the AIA Seattle Public Policy Board, is co-chair of the Seattle Planning Commission, an Affiliate Fellow of the UW Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies, an Urban@UW Fellow, an NCARB Scholar in Professional Practice and a founding member of Sound Communities, a volunteer group of civic leaders focused on leveraging the region’s $60B transit investment to build complete neighborhoods with an abundance of affordable housing at transit hubs. He is the recipient of a 2020 R+D Award from ARCHITECT magazine for ADUniverse, an online application for Seattle homeowners to determine the feasibility of building an accessory dwelling unit on their parcel and a 2021 ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Award for his “Neighborhoods for All” design studio focused on missing middle housing types taught in collaboration with the Seattle Planning Commission.

The work of these Fellows demonstrates the power of architecture to address issues of urban housing, retail design, justice facilities, cohousing and social equity, and sustainable design.

The Fellowship program was developed to elevate those architects who have made a significant contribution to architecture and society and who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession. Election to fellowship not only recognizes the achievements of architects as individuals but also their significant contribution to architecture and society on a national level.

Out of a total AIA membership of over 90,000, there are approximately 3,000 distinguished with the honor of fellowship and honorary fellowship.

National Awards

Honorary AIA

Man in gray suit with goatee and black tie, wearing square-rimmed black glasses. He is smirking and standing in front of a soft-focus garden

Through his 14-year tenure at Architecture 2030, Vincent Martinez, Hon. AIA, has been working to solve the climate crisis by catalyzing global building decarbonization efforts through the development and activation of robust networks focused on private sector commitments, education, training, and public policies. Vincent also helps set the organization’s vision and currently leads Architecture 2030’s work on urban zero-net-carbon buildings and public policy. Vincent is an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and was the 2018 chair of the AIA Energy Leadership Group, a former member of the AIA Sustainability Leadership Group, and is a current member of the AIA Committee for Climate Action and Design Excellence.

This award is given to an allied professional whose contributions the Institute bear national significance.

The 2021 Fellows and National honorees will be honored by AIA National in the year to come, and celebrated at the AIA Seattle awards ceremony in Fall 2021.

Young Architect

Smiling man withMyer Harrell, AIA, LFA, LEED AP BD+C, Homes is a trusted industry leader in high performance design, drawing on his teaching, research, and volunteer service to inspire commercial design practice. He is a Principal and Director of Sustainability for Weber Thompson, an integrated design firm in Seattle nationally recognized for their commitment to sustainability.

Myer was named AIA Seattle Young Architect in 2011, has served on the AIA Seattle Board of Directors since 2016, and is the current president-elect. Nationally, he serves on the AIA Continuing Education Committee. His past service includes the USGBC Greenbuild Program Working Group, the USGBC Education Events Committee, and the Cascadia Green Building Council Board of Directors.

Myer earned a Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the University of Maryland and a Master in Architecture and Commercial Real Estate Certificate from the University of Washington. He has co-instructed architecture studios at the University of Washington and has been invited as a guest lecturer and studio critic. His current research includes building-integrated agriculture, land-use incentives for deep green projects, and crafting a business case for sustainable design choices.

 

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

Advocacy Update – February 2021

Crane photo

NATIONAL NEWS

Green Infrastructure Investments
During AIA National’s virtual Grassroots conference this week, AIA members from across the country met with their U.S. senators and representatives to discuss Congressional investments in green building infrastructure that can address public health and housing needs related to COVID, the pandemic-related economic recession, and our ongoing climate crisis. Attendees from Washington met with the offices of Senator Patty Murray, Senator Maria Cantwell, and Representatives Pramila Jayapal and Marilyn Strickland to discuss the climate impact of buildings and the importance of green infrastructure investments.


STATE NEWS

State Legislative Session
The state’s first online legislative session has been progressing smoothly. Bills needed to pass out of their policy committees by Feb. 15 to remain alive, and bills that have moved on to fiscal committees must pass out of those by Feb. 22. The virtual format means that architects have been able to testify directly to legislators on bills that impact the professionthank you to all those who have done so over the last several weeks! You can read AIA Washington Council’s January legislative report here; look for an updated version after the fiscal committee cut-off next week. You can also follow along at AIA|WA’s Legislative Center. Highlights for AIA thus far include:

  • Practice: alternative project delivery reauthorization for state contracting is moving quickly through the process. A group of occupational licensing bills which AIA opposed because they impacted architect licenses failed to pass out of committee. One bill which AIA does support, to allow individuals with prior criminal convictions to petition a licensing body to become licensed, did pass out of committee.
  • Climate: bills to address building electrification; embodied carbon requirements for state contracts; reducing emissions from HFCs; water quality standards for greywater systems; and environmental justice all passed out of their policy committees and are pending before fiscal committees this week.
  • School construction: a bill to amend Washington’s constitution to lower the threshold to 55 percent for voters to pass school bonds remains alive; but, because a constitutional amendment requires a two-thirds vote of both houses, it will be difficult to pass.
  • Tax: the big tax bills that have gained media attention – the wealth tax, the capital gains tax, and the high value assets tax – all have extra time to pass out of their fiscal committees. The Senate version of the capital gains tax was heard this week and amended to include higher thresholds and a lower tax rate.
  • Growth management: legislation to add climate, equity, and more robust housing elements to the existing planning requirements under the Growth Management Act remain alive and pending before the House Appropriations Committee.
  • Housing: a slew of bills related to facilitating more housing; preventing eviction; and providing affordable housing funding mechanisms for local governments remain alive. We will have a better sense of which bills have traction after the Feb. 22 fiscal committee cut-off.
  • Social justice: similarly, AIA|WA is tracking a large number of bills on renter’s rights, criminal justice, legal reforms, and additional equity-related measures. Next week’s fiscal committee cut-off will give us a clearer picture of the areas legislators are prioritizing.

For more information, contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

State and Local Codes
A reminder that last month Governor Inslee reversed a decision by the State Building Code Council to further delay the implementation date of the 2018 state building codes, which means they went into effect on February 1.

The Seattle City Council approved the Seattle Construction Codes this month (except for the Fire Code, which is pending), and they take effect on March 15. As of February 1, SDCI will accept permit applications using either the 2015 or 2018 codes. After March 15, SDCI will only accept permit applications that use the 2018 codes.

Seattle Energy Code: on Feb. 1, the City Council approved the Seattle Energy Code updates by a vote of 9-0. This code was the subject of AIA Seattle’s Climate Advocacy Week in December, when members met with city councilmembers to discuss the importance of strengthening the city’s energy code requirements. Thank you to all AIA members who participated in outreach to the Council – your efforts made a difference! Special thanks to Mike Fowler AIA, Chris Hellstern AIA, and Nathaniel Gundersen Assoc. AIA for representing architects and AIA Seattle by providing testimony at Council hearings. And particular kudos to Duane Jonlin FAIA of Seattle’s Department of Construction and Inspections, who shepherded this code through the long technical and political processes.

Seattle Schools Chart Path to Fossil Fuel Free
In February, Seattle Public Schools became the first school district in Washington to pass a resolution to transition to 100 percent clean and renewable energy by 2040 by eliminating all use of fossil fuels in district electricity, heating, cooling, cooking, and transportation. The school board also resolved to halt constructing new buildings with fossil fuel infrastructure immediately, to choose electric and other clean appliances for any major renovations and replacements, and to prioritize zero-emission vehicles where feasible for any new vehicle purchases. AIA Seattle sent the School Board a letter in support of the resolution.


OPPORTUNITIES

Applicants Sought for the Seattle Women’s Commission
The Seattle Office for Civil Rights is currently recruiting to fill seven vacancies on the Seattle Women’s Commission. The Commission seeks candidates with diverse backgrounds in women’s rights, community engagement, law, public policy, advocacy, social services, education, and business and who are committed to racial equity. The Seattle Women’s Commission advises the Mayor, City Council, and city departments on matters that relate to women’s issues. The deadline to apply is March 8. More info here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Celebrating Black History Month

Celebrating Black History Month graphic
We are also committed to a process of transparency in what measurable actions we are taking in pursuit of racial justice. We have established an evolving list for the sake of mutual accountability in our member-led organization. Read the full evolving list of Racial Justice commitments here.

 

Organization Updates:

  • As a corollary to our 2019 Intercultural Leadership Program, AIA Seattle is partnering with NOMA NW and Planning in Color to develop a firm leadership cohort for 2021, focused on architecture (and allied) firm culture change. Through peer-based learning, this group will develop and share with one another best practices to meet the objectives laid out in the NOMA NW Call-to-Action. Stay tuned for details – this program is scheduled for May.
  • Last November, the AIA Seattle Board approved the formation of a JE:DI task force. The intent of this group is to facilitate actionable change in making the profession of architecture within our local community more equitable, just, anti-racist and truly inclusive.Task Force Members include: Rob Misel AIA of Miller Hull and Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA of GGLO (current co-chairs), Amarpreet Sethi, Michele Hill AIA, Michelle Yates Assoc. AIA, Osama Quotah AIA, and Susan Frieson AIA.

 

Diversity Roundtable Committee Updates:

  • The “Diversity by Design” exhibition is being updated for 2021, and will be displayed on screens at King Street Station in August. Submissions are still being accepted here.
  • While “Architects in Schools” program is currently on pause, DRT is working with the Wild Students in collaboration with Sawhorse Revolution, virtually mentoring high school students about the design and build process. In the Spring, they will transform the design of the Garden Shed for Danny Woo Gardens into a set of construction documents that the students can build.
  • Follow Diversity Roundtable’s Architecture Spotlights campaign this month on Instagram. @drt_aiaseattle

 

NOMA Updates:

 

Events and resources throughout the month of February and beyond:

Have another event or resource we should share? Tell us about it here.
Posted in Advocacy, Design In Public, Diversity Roundtable, For the Profession, For the Public, Missions, Visions, Values

Register Now for our Upcoming Decoded Seminars

Join us for five upcoming sessions to learn from Code experts. 

Session 1 | Decoded | Tall Wood: A New Path Forward – Code Provisions and Design Steps
February 24, 2021 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM // Class Credit: 2 LU/HSW

Session 2 | Decoded | 2018 IBC Update Redux
April 28-29, 2021 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM // Class Credit: 4 LU/HSW

Session 3 | Decoded | Practical Guide to Energy Code Compliance
July 29-30, 2021 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM

Session 4 | Decoded | FHA/ADA/IBC Chapter 11
September 21-22, 2021 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM

Session 5 | Decoded | Land Use Code Bonanza
November 30 – December 1, 2021 | ONLINE | 12:00PM – 2:00PM

All session dates and times subject to change.


Special Thanks to our 2021 Code Series Sponsors


Code Committee

Special thanks to the Code Committee for planning this series of sessions!


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Zoe Guckenheimer, Program & Event Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Connor Descheemaker, Member Engagement Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Kristen Lound, Associate Director, Growth & Operations at AIA Seattle

Posted in Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – January 2021

American flags in shade

STATE NEWS

State Code Returned to Feb. 1 Implementation Date  
On Jan. 12, Governor Inslee reversed a Jan. 8 decision by the State Building Code Council which delayed the implementation date of the 2018 building codes from Feb. 1 to July 1, 2021. The governor’s decision returns the implementation date to February 1. AIA does not anticipate further changes to this much-amended date. You may read Gov. Inslee’s letter on his decision here.

The 2018 Seattle codes will maintain an effective date of March 15, 2021, pending Council approval of the Seattle codes in February. Starting February 1, SDCI will accept permit applications using either the 2015 or 2018 codes. After March 15, SDCI will only accept permit applications that use the 2018 codes.

State Legislative Session Kicks Off
A state legislative session like no other – nearly entirely conducted online – began on January 11 and will run for 105 calendar days. AIA Washington Council will be reporting on the session regularly. You can also follow along at AIA|WA’s Legislative Center. Key issues for AIA include:

  • Practice: alternative project delivery reauthorization for state contracting; efforts to reduce the threshold for predesign work on state contracts.
  • Climate: building electrification; embodied carbon requirements for state contracts; reducing emissions from HFCs; water quality standards for gray water systems; environmental justice.
  • School construction: amending Washington’s constitution to lower the threshold for voters to pass school bonds.
  • Tax: capital gains tax; eliminating state tax on COVID-related financial support.
  • Growth management: adding climate, equity, and more robust housing elements to planning requirements under the Growth Management Act.
  • Housing: housing benefit districts; facilitating ADUs; fully funding the state’s Housing Trust Fund; eviction prevention; affordable housing funding mechanisms for local governments.

For more information, contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

Seattle Seeks Green Building Incentives Feedback
The City of Seattle is updating its green building incentives, which encourage energy savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions beyond the code to support Seattle’s clean energy future. These incentives include the Green Building Standard, which allows projects in certain zones to achieve extra floor area, and Priority Green, which allows expedited permitting. OPCD and SDCI are seeking comments on its initial proposal, available here. Please direct your comments by Jan. 29 to:

Brennon Staley
Strategic Advisor | OPCD
brennon.staley@seattle.gov | 206.684.4625

Permanent Supportive Housing New Land Use Code
On January 27, the Seattle City Council’s Select Committee on Homelessness Strategies will consider legislation by Councilmember Andrew Lewis to create a new land use code that will exempt permanent supportive housing from Design Review and eliminate some space requirements like onsite bike parking. The proposal also exempts floor area used for on-site supportive services from calculations for FAR limits and allows for certain SDCI waivers to be made as an administrative decision. AIA Seattle sent a letter to councilmembers expressing support for the overall legislation while expressing mixed opinions about the provisions related to bike parking. If you would like to comment on the legislation, contact your councilmembers.

Rico Quirindongo AIA joins Seattle OPCD
AIA member Rico Quirindongo has joined Seattle OPCD as the agency’s deputy director. In this role he will manage OPCD’s Community Planning, Long Range Planning, and Land Use Policy Divisions; help to align City planning functions and prioritize the City’s capital investments; expand cohesive community outreach strategies to reach traditionally underrepresented populations; and develop the department’s annual work program. Congratulations Rico!


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  •  AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

CODE SESSIONS

Lighting Design Lab’s Cost Effective Code Compliance Classes
These classes are free and cover the Washington and Seattle energy codes.

  • Jan. 26: Building Envelope
  • Feb. 2: Lighting
  • Feb. 9: Water Heating

AIA Washington Council Webinar of the State Commercial Energy Code
Feb. 10, 3:00-4:30pm
This session will cover the significant changes to the 2018 Washington State Energy Code for Commercial Buildings. We will explore the new code in the context of Washington State Energy Code goals, alignment with the new state energy strategy, and the state’s implementation timeline.  More info here.

AIA Washington Council Q&A with State Rep. Davina Duerr
State Representative Davina Duerr (D-Bothell) will be speaking to AIA members as part of AIA|WA’s Capital Connections event. Rep. Duerr is the only current architect in the State Legislature and this will be her first opportunity to speak with AIA members as a group. All members are invited. Rep. Duerr will speak to what it’s like to bring architect thinking to the Legislature; her experiences from her first year and a half in Olympia; and her priorities for 2021. She’ll also answer your questions. Register here.

UDF: Equitable TOD w/ King County Council Chair Claudia Balducci
Claudia Balducci, King County Regional Council Chair and former Bellevue Mayor, will join UDF to discuss King County’s approach to transit oriented development (TOD), specifically related to the expanding light rail and bus rapid transit in the ST2 and ST3 packages, through the lens of the King County Equity and Social Justice Strategic Plan.  More info

King County Stakeholder Meeting: C-PACER
Jan 27, 2-3:30pm, Register
Join King County for an online workshop about the development of the County’s Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy + Resilience (C-PACER) program. Staff will provide a brief overview and context of the C-PACER program, highlight resources and King County’s process, and hold a facilitated discussion to get input from stakeholders.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Benefits of Resilient Design in New Construction

A new generation of buildings featuring resilient design will perform better in earthquakes with less damage, faster recovery, and reduced repair and business interruption costs.

Champion: California Manufacturers & Technology Association

More Panelist to be Announced

Dave Mar, SE, Owner, Mar Structural Design
Lance Hastings, President + CEO, California Manufacturers & Technology Association
Maryann Phipps, SE, President, E Structure
Craig Stockbridge, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, GBD Architects

Regisiter Here

 

 

Posted in Adaptation & Resilience

2020 Advocacy Actions

downtown bike lanes with riders

Local

State

  • We monitored Governor’s Inslee’s proclamations on construction and professional service work during COVID-19 and provided resources to members.
  • We held a Climate Comprehensive webinar to recap AIA’s work on climate issues across many policy levels – including AIA National’s Big Move on climate.
  • We participated in rulemaking for Washington’s Clean Buildings Act (HB 1257, 2019), which required the Department of Commerce to develop a state energy performance standard for commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet. We provided a webinar session for members to learn about the program.
  • We commented on the draft 2021 State Energy Strategy to support the state’s goals related to climate.
  • We passed and supported the rollout of Washington’s C-PACER program, which will provide a private financing mechanism for building owners to complete deep green retrofits and resiliency improvements.
  • We protected architect licensure from legislative attempts to weaken licensing requirements.
  • We supported housing legislation to facilitate more ADUs, help increase housing affordability, and stem the tide of homelessness.
  • We successfully opposed legislation to weaken predesign requirements in state contracting.
  • We continued to advocate against the B&O tax structure for professional services with large subcontractor payments as part of the state’s overall taxation system reform.
  • We supported efforts to address embodied carbon in building materials for state-funded projects.
  • We defended the state energy code and the State Building Code Council’s mission and structure.

National

  • We opposed a Trump Administration proposal to designate “classical” architecture as the preferred style for federal buildings.
  • We supported the YIMBY Act (HR 4307), which passed the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill would address the country’s affordable housing crisis by streamlining affordable housing production and zoning for high-density single-family and multifamily housing.
  • We sent a letter to AIA National’s Board of Directors in support of a proposal by AIA’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct prohibiting members from knowingly designing spaces intended for execution and torture, including indefinite or prolonged solitary confinement.
Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Advocacy Update – December 2020

NATIONAL NEWS

AIA National Approves Rule on Justice Facility Spaces
In December, AIA National’s Board of Directors approved new rules to the AIA’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct prohibiting members from knowingly designing spaces intended for execution and torture, including indefinite or prolonged solitary confinement of prisoners for 22 hours or more per day without meaningful human contact, for more than 15 consecutive days. The Board expressed its opinion that the design of such spaces is inconsistent with the profession’s fundamental responsibility to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public and uphold human rights. AIA Seattle sent a letter in support of this change to the Board.


STATE NEWS

A Legislative Session Like No Other
The state legislative session begins on January 11 and will be conducted largely virtually this year. As always, you can follow along on TVW and by reading AIA Washington Council’s legislative updates during the session. If you are interested in more information about how to follow a particular issue or bill, or if you have questions, let Kirsten know. For more detailed information about how to impact state policy during the session, consider attending AIA|WA’s Navigating the State Legislative Session webinar, described under Events below.

For more information about AIA’s agenda for the session, see AIA|WA’s legislative preview here. Key agenda items from AIA Seattle’s perspective include:

Climate

  • Measures to decarbonize buildings by supporting building electrification
  • Embodied carbon requirements for state-funded buildings
  • Clean energy retrofits for public buildings
  • State Building Code Council – energy code and fending off attacks on its structure or mission
  • Growth Management Act – adding a climate element to planning requirements

Housing

  • Permanent funding source for the State Housing Trust Fund
  • Growth Management Act – amend the GMA’s existing housing element by requiring counties to:
    • Plan for housing based on targets, income, and type
    • Plan for duplexes, triplexes, and townhomes
    • Plan for homeless housing
    • Work to limit displacement from market forces in high-risk areas
    • Further fair housing principles
  • Incentivize and remove barriers to missing middle housing, including ADUs
  • Housing Benefit Districts – planning and land acquisition around high capacity transit stations for complete communities, with a focus on low-income housing

Racial & Social Justice

In addition to understanding and incorporating BIPOC and low-income community concerns in its focus areas, AIA|WA will be tracking policy issues related to race and social justice during the 2021 legislative session. While we may not be able to actively support the wide array of proposals in this category, we intend to make members aware of them and provide information on how individuals and firms can weigh in as they wish. For firms that have signed on to the NOMA Call-to-Action Pledge, this information may be used to help comply with Ongoing Commitment #5:

Become engaged at the state and local levels in public, housing, and education policy. Advocate for policies that promote integrated neighborhoods; legislation that benefits the growth, resources, infrastructure and, therefore, prosperity of all communities and demographics.

Currently, our list includes these areas:

  • Assistance for individuals and families hit hardest by COVID.
  • Criminal justice system reform
  • Police reform
  • Homeownership opportunities
  • Investments and revenue
    • Provide new investments in BIPOC communities and maintain existing social safety net programs.
    • Identify more progressive sources of revenue to invest in long-term commitments
  • Broadband access

If you are interested in helping AIA|WA navigate these issues by providing feedback and helping to weigh policy proposals, please let Kirsten know.

Governor Announces Climate Priorities
Gov. Inslee announced his climate priorities for the state legislative session, including a Healthy Homes, Clean Buildings Act that provides a statewide approach to systematically decarbonize buildings. Although the details are not yet finalized, here are the main components:

  • Requires any new buildings to be zero-carbon by 2030 and puts the state on a path to eliminate fossil fuels from existing buildings by 2050
  • Strengthens state building codes to incentivize electric appliances over gas
  • Creates a heat pump and electrification program to support clean electricity for space and water heating
  • Authorizes public utilities to provide incentives for high-efficiency electric equipment, paving the way for utilities’ existing energy efficiency funds to be spent on climate-friendly appliances rather than gas
  • Requires transition planning by utilities:
    • Requires utilities to produce plans for transitioning their gas workers to new jobs
    • Requires utilities to align long-term plans for their gas systems with the state’s climate goals, and requires planning for an equitable transition away from gas in buildings

The Governor’s budget also includes proposed capital budget investments of $141 million for programs and projects to support the transition to cleaner buildings. This includes:

  • Healthier homes for low-income families: $55 million to weatherize and support energy efficiency investments for 7,000 low-income residences.
  • Clean energy retrofits for public buildings: $66 million to retrofit more than 200 public buildings.
  • Next-generation “smart buildings”: $20 million to shift from fossil fuels to high-efficiency electric heat pumps and other electric equipment.

LOCAL NEWS

AIA Seattle Climate Advocacy Week – thank you!     
Thank you to our members who participated in AIA Seattle’s first Climate Advocacy Week. Your meetings with Seattle City Councilmembers on the city’s commercial energy code showed strong support for the code and for green building in general. The questions you received helped us to understand what councilmembers are concerned about and to share that information with our coalition partners who will be conducting similar meetings. The code will come before the Council’s Land Use and Neighborhoods Committee on January 13 and the full council later in January. We will keep you updated on its progress and additional opportunities to weigh in with your support.

Permanent Supportive Housing New Land Use Code
Seattle City Councilmember Andrew Lewis is working on legislation to create a new land use code for permanent supportive housing with the intent of reducing cost and ensuring time savings. The legislation will exempt permanent supportive housing from Design Review and eliminate some space requirements like onsite bike parking. It also exempts floor area used for on-site supportive services from calculations for FAR limits and allows for certain SDCI waivers to be made as an administrative decision. This legislation will be considered in January. Read more details about the proposal here. AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board has expressed support for this legislation but has mixed opinions about eliminating bike parking in any type of multi-family housing. If you have comments on this proposal for AIA to consider, please let Kirsten know.

Affordable Housing on Religious Organization Property
This month Mayor Durkan announced the development of land use policies to provide religious organizations with more flexibility to develop their land with long-term, income-restricted affordable housing. The state Legislature passed a bill in 2019 requiring cities to allow additional density for affordable housing on property owned or controlled by a religious organization. The affordable housing must be reserved for low-income households with incomes under 80 percent of area median income for at least 50 years. Faith-based organizations own more than 300 acres of land in Seattle. The policy will likely allow taller buildings in multi-family zones and denser development in single family zones. OPCD is working on the details and Durkan is expected to send legislation to the City Council early in 2021.


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Design Review Board Vacancies
Seattle is looking for candidates to fill 15 upcoming openings on the city’s Design Review Boards. Board members evaluate the design of new buildings based on citywide and neighborhood-specific design guidelines. The boards review large mixed-use developments, multifamily housing, and commercial projects. These volunteer positions will start on April 4, 2021, when retiring board members’ terms expire. Design profession representatives are specifically sought for the Northwest Board and the West Board, but other positions (development, landscape design, local residential/community) are also available. Applications are due Dec. 31. More info here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  •  AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

Navigating the State Legislative Session     Jan. 8, 2021
AIA|WA is hosting this webinar immediately before the legislative session begins to review how the legislative process works and help you learn to navigate the state’s legislative website with ease. These skills will allow you to follow the bills and issues you are interested in and better understand how you can maximize contacts to your legislators and best impact the process. More info here.

AIA Washington Council’s Capitol Connections    Jan. 24-29, 2001
Sign up for AIA|WA’s Capitol Connections, architects’ annual lobby day in Olympia, where members get to discuss issues important to the profession directly with their legislators. The event will be entirely virtual this year, with a kick-off webinar briefing, an opportunity to hear from key legislators on our issues, and online meetings with legislators throughout the week. We’ll be talking to legislators specifically about building electrification and housing. Be part of the political process from your home office or dining room! More info here.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Advocacy Update – November 2020

STATE NEWS

State Energy Strategy Draft Released
Washington’s draft State Energy Strategy has been released for public comment. Section D focuses on energy consumption and emissions from the built environment and can be found on pages 63-90. The State Energy Strategy is a roadmap for the state to consider when evaluating how we meet decarbonization goals across buildings, transportation, industry, and electricity sectors. The draft strategy is open for written public comment through Dec. 7, followed by public hearings. It is dense and ambitious, and it could benefit from language that prioritizes the many action items included. More info on the State Energy Strategy is available here. Comments on any part of the strategy may be emailed to energystrategy@commerce.wa.gov. If you would like your comments to be considered as part of AIA’s response, please contact Kirsten.

State Election Results
Look for AIA|WA’s more detailed report on the state legislative elections at the end of this month, but in short: the state legislature appears to have emerged from the general election with the same party make-up it had before the elections in both the House and the Senate. There is a slight question mark in the 5th District (Issaquah/eastern King County), where incumbent Senator Mark Mullet (D) is leading his more liberal Democratic challenger by 73 votes. But with the results staying as they are, one Democrat and one Republican lost their seats in both the House and the Senate. This does not make a big difference the House, and it only makes a small one in the Senate, where the Democrat-Republican split is narrower. In the Senate, the defeated Democratic incumbent, Dean Takko from the 19th District in the southwest corner of Washington, was much more conservative than the Democratic challenger who defeated the Republican incumbent in the 28th District (Tacoma/southern Pierce County), T’wina Nobles, potentially moving the Senate a fraction to the left. Overall, Democrats expected to gain more seats in both houses, and this result may scuttle some of the most progressive legislation on their agenda.


LOCAL NEWS

AIA Seattle Climate Advocacy Week | Nov. 30-Dec. 4
The City of Seattle is updating its commercial energy code as part of its 2018 Construction Code update. These code changes will be considered by the City Council in early December, after the city’s budget process is complete. Once approved, the new codes will go into effect in February or March 2021, depending on Council timing.

AIA Seattle strongly supports the city’s commercial energy code revisions because these changes will help Seattle dramatically reduce fossil fuels in buildings over the next decade. We’re hosting Climate Advocacy Week to support the effort, asking members to help us make sure our city councilmembers know how important buildings are to combating climate change. Climate Advocacy Week includes a kick-off briefing, a climate-focused happy hour, and an opportunity for Seattle architects to join their colleagues in online meetings with your city councilmembers. To learn more or to RSVP, click here. Your advocacy will make a big difference!


OPPORTUNITIES

Seattle Design Review Board Vacancies
Seattle is looking for candidates to fill 15 upcoming openings on the city’s Design Review Boards. Board members evaluate the design of new buildings based on citywide and neighborhood-specific design guidelines. The boards review large mixed-use developments, multifamily housing, and commercial projects. These volunteer positions will start on April 4, 2021, when retiring board members’ terms expire. Design profession representatives are specifically sought for the Northwest Board and the West Board, but other positions (development, landscape design, local residential/community) are also available. Applications are due Dec. 31. More info here.

AIA Washington Council’s Capitol Connections | Jan. 24-29, 2001
Sign up for AIA|WA’s Capitol Connections, architects’ annual lobby day in Olympia, where members get to discuss issues important to the profession directly with their state legislators. The event will be entirely virtual this year, with a kick-off webinar briefing, an opportunity to hear from key legislators on our issues, and online meetings with legislators throughout the week. Be part of the political process from your home office or dining room! More info here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. Most meetings and events have moved online. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom.

For info on how to access either meeting, contact Kirsten.

Clean Buildings Act Overview for Architects | Dec. 11
This AIA|WA webinar will provide an overview of Washington’s new energy performance standard for large commercial buildings. The state Department of Commerce, which runs the program, will provide an overview, followed by a Q&A session. This webinar is designed to help architects understand the new standards (voluntary until 2026) and start thinking through the types of conversations they will need to have with commercial clients about it. More info here.

Navigating the State Legislative Session | Jan. 8, 2021
AIA|WA is hosting this webinar immediately before the legislative session begins to review how the legislative process works and help you learn to navigate the state’s legislative website with ease. These skills will allow you to follow the bills and issues you are interested in and better understand how you can maximize contacts to your legislators and best impact the process. More info here.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

2020 Honor Awards Winners

SEATTLE, November 16, 2020—The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Seattle chapter hosted the 70th annual Honor Awards for Washington Architecture on November 16 to celebrate excellence in design.

The distinguished jury included Marsha Maytum, FAIA, LEED AP (LMSA), Pascale Sablan, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP (Beyond the Built EnvironmentS9ARCHITECTURE), and Tatiana Bilbao (Tatiana Bilbao ESTUDIO). Co-Chairs for the 2020 AIA Seattle Honor Awards were Kevin Snook AIA (ZGF Architects) and Ming-Lee Yuan (Olson Kundig).

From 103 submittals, the jury chose 20 award winners from three categories – built, conceptual, and research & innovation. This was the third year of the Research & Innovation category, recognizing strides in research and innovation coming out of our region, elevating our communities’ awareness of advancement in architectural practice. This was the fifth year of the Energy in Design Award to commend projects that have made quantifiably significant strides in energy reduction while also maintaining the highest qualitative design caliber.

In addition to the awards, it was the third year of the Young Voices Selection (YVS), a program with the aim to engage and elevate the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. The three YVS panelists were Molly Evans (Olson Kundig), Marquesa Figueroa (SRG Partnership), and Higinio Turrubiates (Integrus Architecture).

Across the spectrum of project types, the jury acknowledged the strong design culture represented in our region and were so impressed with the “beautiful and inspired projects that are committed to sustainability and tackling social issues, engaging with the projects communities while also solving site relationships elegantly and simply.”

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to our esteemed jury and Honor Awards Committee! 
Missed the live show? You can catch the replay over on our YouTube channel!

AWARD OF HONOR

TheBurkeMuseumGallery_01.jpgThe Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture by Olson Kundig is Washington’s oldest museum – turned inside-out. The jury admired the building’s personification of architecture and spatial justice and applauded the designers, the design team, and all the community leaders and members who participated in the designing and execution of this incredible project.

 

Cottonwood Canyon Experience Center - Honor Award 2020, by Signal Architecture + ResearchCottonwood Canyon Experience Center by Signal Architecture + Research is an Experience Center marking time in a rural canyon landscape. The jury appreciated that this project embeds all the values that architecture should promote in a very simple, beautiful, orchestrated way. They also noted that it’s a place for social interaction with the possibility of understanding the history, the very core root of this place, while making exactly the space for connection with others and with nature at large.

 

Hugo House - Honor Award 2020, by NBBJHugo House by NBBJ was founded as an urban writer’s retreat. The jury appreciated the way in which this project maintains the important, somewhat eccentric, community spaces that are in our cities and finding new places for them to thrive. The project was beautifully executed, taking simple, durable, cost-effective materials and elevating those materials to a thing of beauty with great creativity and unexpected moments in the design.

 

Wagner Education Center at the Center for Wooden Boats - Honor Award 2020, by Olson KundigThe Wagner Education Center at the Center for Wooden Boats by Olson Kundig is a new front door for a beloved Seattle organization that celebrates the area’s maritime heritage. The jury appreciated how the project’s description is stated, as a building, as a functional armature. The word “armature” evoked a space that holds things together. This space holds the connection of the community and the physical connection between the city, the downtown, and the lake, and most of all, the heritage, cultures, and traditions of boat making in the area.

 

ENERGY IN DESIGN AWARD

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design by The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP is a Living Building Challenge project at Georgia Tech designed to foster environmental education, research, and a public forum for community outreach. The jury appreciated that the project’s mantra – More wood, less carbon – was exposed, expressed, and celebrated through incredible design and observed that a project that performs and gives back to the earth can also be a beacon of beauty and design excellence.

AWARD OF MERIT

Byrd Barr Place by SHKS Architects (Conceptual)
Lincoln High School by Bassetti Architects
Past Present Future: a tense balance by Novaby (Research & Innovation)
Staying Power by Framework Cultural Placemaking and City of Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (Research & Innovation)
The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design by The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP

HONORABLE MENTION

Goldendale State Park Observatory by Patano Studio Architecture
Little House/Big Shed by David M. Van Galen, AIA
Olympic High School by Sundberg Kennedy Ly Au Young Architects

YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Seattle City Light Denny Substation by NBBJ

To view all of the 2020 submissions, visit the:

Click here for online gallery


CATALOGUE

The 2020 Honor Awards for Washington Architecture left us with a lot to celebrate! We had a blast on the red carpet for our first-ever virtual live event celebrating 20 award winners and our greater design community.

Now, we are thrilled to share the first-ever AIA Seattle Honor Awards Catalogue!

In this publication, you will find…
– A letter from fashionable co-hosts and Honor Awards Committee Co-chairs Kevin Snook and Ming-Lee Yuan;
– The full list of submitted projects and firm names for this year’s awards;
– A closer look at the Energy in Design Award and the 17 qualifying projects;
– Hallmark spreads for each awarded project, including juror quotes for the winners of Award of Honor, Energy in Design, and Award of Merit;
– Features from our 2020 Honor Awards sponsors highlighting their relationship to the Honor Awards and more!

 


Special thanks to our 2020 Honor Awards Sponsors:2020 Honor Awards Sponsors

 

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Honor Awards

Recipient Announced for 2020 Northwest Washington Section Scholarship

AIA Northwest Washington - A Section of AIA Seattle

The Northwest Washington Section Scholarship Fund has awarded one scholarships totaling $4000 to a local student pursuing Architectural education.

2020-21 Recipient:
My name is Matthew Robinson, I was born and raised in Bellingham Washington and I am 22 years old. Growing up I spent my time running around in the forests of Chuckanut Mountain and playing wiffle-ball with my neighbors during the beautiful Northwest summers. I still enjoy being outside, taking advantage of the vast assortment of trails and parks in both Washington and Oregon whenever I can. I attended Sehome High School where I played both basketball and baseball before making the decision to go to college at the University of Oregon in Eugene. I am currently entering the fifth year of my Bachelors of Architecture education, with a Minor in Landscape Architecture. I enjoy traveling, listening to music, hiking, spending time with family and friends, and cheering on my favorite sports teams.

About the Northwest Washington Section Scholarship Fund
The goal of the AIA Northwest Washington Section Scholarship is to encourage and assist local residents of Whatcom, Skagit, Island and San Juan Counties who are pursuing a degree in architecture in an accredited School of Architecture. Entering its 9th year, the scholarship fund primarily funded by funds raised at the annual Scholarship Golf Tournament. Despite the cancellation of the 2020 tournament, the Section remains committed to funding the program throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to help students in the region.

About the Northwest Washington Section of American Institute of Architects Seattle Chapter
AIA Northwest Washington is section of AIA Seattle that provides events and programs for AIA members in Skagit, Whatcom, Island and San Juan counties.

About the Seattle Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1894, AIA Seattle is a not-for-profit professional association of architects, allied professionals, and laypeople. AIA Seattle provides the architecture community with resources and relationships to make a difference through design.

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington, For the Public, Students

2020 NWW Design Awards Winners Announced

Collage image of six award winners, described in text below

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Northwest Washington Section hosted its virtual Design Awards on October 15 to celebrate excellence in Design.

The jury included Karen Braitmayer (Seattle, Studio Pacifica), Linda Smeins (Bellingham, Professor Emeritus, Western Washington University), and Susan McCants (Seattle, Splice). The jury worked with AIA Northwest Washington members Dave Christensen AIA (Christensen Design Management) and Julie Blazek AIA (HKP Architects), who guided the Design Awards process.

From 17 submissions, the jury chose six projects for recognition with Merit, across commercial and residential design. The jury remarked that the submissions highlighted the scope and quality of architectural design accomplished by the architects of our Northwest Washington region, and while each of the projects had elements deserving commendation, they agreed that six of the submissions are worthy of the Merit Award.

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to our esteemed jury and Design Awards committee!

Click here to view the full Design Awards catalogue.
Click here to view the full recording of the awards ceremony and keynote lecture.

Bloom House interior with large windows onto natural landscape, with wood-paneled floors and ceiling

 

Bloom Residence by Pelletier + Schaar was awarded for its accessible design that takes advantage of sweeping views on Camano Island, Washington. The jurors commented the project is a strong example of how a modest residential project can be elevated through the use of light, materials and a clear plan diagram. It is notable in what it accomplishes on a small scale.

 

 

David Pelletier, Pelletier + Schaar, Architect of Record
Pearl Schaar, Pelletier + Schaar, Lead Designer/Project Manager
Tracy Tiffany, Tiffany Construction, Contractor
Gabriela Siia, ZVELT Engineering Design PLLC, Structural Engineer
Photo credit: Tim Sherrill

Wood cabin in forest enclave with expansive patio. Lake Cavanaugh Addition project described at right.

Lake Cavanaugh Addition by HKP Architects was awarded for its addition of a guest cabin and activity space to the two existing cabins in Mt. Vernon, Washington. The solution was to add the third cabin connected to the others with a covered walkway. The jury was impressed by the way the three cabins blend with the landscape and form an iconic Northwest scene, plus the consideration the walkways provide for aging-in-place.

 

Design Team:
Brian Poppe, HKP Architects, Partner-in-Charge
Austin Miles, HKP Architects, Project Manager
Omar Velasco, HKP Architects, Project Support

Collaborators:
Jordan Janicki, DCG Engineers, Structural Engineering
Danny Ochoa, DCG Engineers, Civil Engineering
Misty Philbin, The Philbin Group, Landscape Architect
Patricia Lenssen, ASLA, SITES AP, Pacific Landscape Architecture, Project Manager
Kenny Chriest, Cavanaugh Custom Homes, General Contractor
Simply Yards, Landscape Contractor
Photo credit: Mike Penney, Mike Penney Photography

Rust-hued guest house adorned by three planters, with back patio, placed in front of setting sun. Described at right.

Mazama Meadow Guest House by Designs Northwest Architects was awarded for its “appealing” overall design of this vacation retreat in North Central Washington. The jury responded to the feeling of being part of the nature outside but in the comfort of your home. The challenges of the location were addressed by cooling design strategies to keep the home comfortable throughout the year, and the use of low maintenance materials for sustainability.

 


Dan Nelson
, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
Matt Radach, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Designer
Impel Construction, General Contractor
Alpine Welding, Metalwork
Photo credit: S. Brousseau Photography

Cabin-shaped library, set beyond asphalt parking lot. Many wood supports and pointed roof, described at right.

Orcas Island Public Library Expansion by HKP Architects was awarded for its “graceful” and “organic” expansion of the library in Eastsound, Washington. Challenges included the form of the existing building, and the steep slope on the west side of the property. The jury was struck by the successful siting of the addition to create a main entry and drive court, as well as interior spaces that provide a range of loud to quiet environments, and use of natural daylight.

 

 

Juile Blazek, Christine Baldwin, HKP Architects, Architect
MIG/SvR, Civil and Landscape
Lund Opsahl LLC, Structural Engineers
Harris Group, Inc., Mechanical Engineers
K Engineers, Electrical Engineers
The Greenbusch Group, Acoustical and AV
Materials Testing & Consulting, Geotechnical
Adams Consulting & Estimating, Hardware Consultant
Applied Building Information, Specifications
Photo credit: Mike Penney Photography

Stacked, mixed-use building of various shades of brown and red, with mixed materials. Retail on the groundfloor, with a staircase leading to a plaza and apartment spaces on the upper floors. Described at right.

Plaza Mixed Use by Designs Northwest Architects in association with TCA Architecture was awarded for its “notable” complex of micro and studio apartments, plus retail space, in Kirkland, Washington. The jury remarked it meets high standards for sustainability, while providing needed affordable housing. They were impressed with the spaces to encourage community, and the high level of finishing.

 

 

Dan Nelson, Designs Northwest Architects, Principal Architect
William Lippens, Designs Northwest Architects, Project Architect
Brian Harris, TCA Architecture, Principal Architect
Jason Warner, TCA Architecture, Senior Project Manager
Kirkland Sustainable Investments LLC, Contractor
Swenson Say Faget, Structural Engineer
Vanessa Pantley, Interior Design
Kathleen Bradley Reader, Bradley Design Group, Landscape Architect
Photo credit: Swift Studio and John McKinney

Twin pitched-roof buildings in gray-brown, accented by blue-yellow-red overhangs jutting out the front of the buildings, behind a strip of asphalt, in front of blue, party cloudy sky. Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Dental Clinic Expansion described at right.

 

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Dental Clinic Expansion by HKP Architects was awarded for its dental clinic expansion with a “tasteful aesthetic look” in La Conner, Washington. The jury focused on the appealing colors, the sustainable strategies incorporated, and consideration of accessibility while maintaining the cultural design of the existing building. The design also responded to the challenges of the steeply sloped site and an archeologically sensitive boundary.

 

Juile Blazek, Austin Miles, HKP Architects, Architect
DGC, Inc., Civil and Structural Engineers
Berona Engineers, Mechanical Engineers
TFWB, Electrical Engineers
Henry Schein/A-dec, Dental Equipment
Roen Associates, Cost Estimating
Photo credit: Mike Penney Photography


Special thanks to our 2020 Design Awards sponsors!

Title - Freeland & Associates; Platinum - HB Hansen, GeoTest, Tiger Construction, Fisher Construction, Aldrich; Gold - TFWB Engineers, GeoEngineers, Lund Opsahl, Dawson, FSI Engineers, The Greenbusch Group, HKP Architects, Ram Construction, Kingworks Structural Engineers, K Engineers, Judd & Black Appliance

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington, For the Public

Advocacy Update – October 2020

 

VOTE!

Don’t forget to submit your ballot by Nov. 3. If you are not registered, the deadline is Oct. 26 for mail or online registrations, but you can register to vote up to Nov. 3 if you show up in person at your county elections office. Ballots must be postmarked or placed in a drop box by Nov. 3. Statewide drop box locations are here; King County’s drop box locations are here. Voters’ guides: King County’s is here; check your county’s elections office webpage for other counties. Finally, remember that you can verify that your ballot was received and accepted. King County’s verification page is here; check your county’s elections office webpage for other counties. Ballots will be mailed starting on Oct. 14.


STATE NEWS

State Energy Strategy Draft Due Oct. 30
Washington is developing a 2021 State Energy Strategy to support the state’s goals related to climate. The call for an updated state energy strategy was part of 2019 legislation establishing a new clean electricity standard for Washington, the Clean Energy Transformation Act (SB 5116). The State Energy Strategy is a roadmap for the state to consider when evaluating how we meet our decarbonization goals across buildings, transportation, industry, and electricity sectors. The process is led by the Department of Commerce, advised by an external Advisory Group, and shaped by technical analysis and support from the Clean Energy Transition Institute. More info here. The draft strategy documents will be released on Oct. 30, followed by public hearings. AIA offered comments during the strategy development process and will offer additional comments on the draft once it is released. If you’d like to be part of AIA’s review, please contact Kirsten.


LOCAL NEWS

City of Seattle Budget Process
Seattle kicked off its 2021 budget process in late September with the release of Mayor Durkan’s proposed budget and department presentations to councilmembers. Council hearings and public meetings will be held through the deadline for passing the budget, Nov. 23. The city’s budget calendar is here. You can participate by signing up to provide public comment at a meeting, emailing your councilmembers, or checking their websites for district-specific open meetings and other opportunities for feedback. You can also sign up to receive email newsletters from any of the councilmembers on their websites – these newsletters often have the latest information on district events and councilmember positions.

Seattle City Council Passes Climate Notes Resolution
On Sept. 21, the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a resolution by Councilmember Alex Pedersen that would require Council staff to evaluate the carbon impacts of city projects starting in January 2021. This information will be part of the briefing information distributed to councilmembers on each legislative proposal. Specifically, the resolution asks staff to include information on how each project would impact carbon emissions and whether the project would help or hinder the city’s resiliency to climate change.

AIA Seattle Climate Advocacy Week: Seattle Energy Code
The City of Seattle is updating its commercial energy code as part of its 2018 Construction Code update. You may review the detailed code revisions on the city’s website and read a summary of the changes from AIA Seattle’s Shift Zero coalition partner, the Northwest Energy Coalition, here. These code changes will be considered by the City Council in early December, after the city’s budget process is complete. Once approved, the new codes will go into effect on Feb. 1, along with the statewide code updates.

AIA Seattle strongly supports these code revisions because we believe these changes will help Seattle dramatically reduce fossil fuels in buildings over the next decade. We’re kicking off plans for AIA Seattle’s Climate Advocacy Week, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, when we’ll be asking our members to help us make sure our city councilmembers know how important buildings are to combating climate change and how the energy code changes will put us on a path to reaching the city’s climate goals. Moreover, we’ll be engaging in the same outreach to our King County Councilmembers, who will also be considering the Seattle Energy Code updates during this timeframe. Join us in a week of advocacy – we’ll have learning events, a climate happy hour, and an opportunity for you to join your fellow architects in online meetings with your local representatives. To learn more or to RSVP, click here. Your advocacy will make a big difference!

Seattle Stormwater Code Update
The Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections continues to work on its 2021 Stormwater Code and Manual update, which is scheduled to be effective in July 2021. Revised documents will be posted in November and in January-February 2021. More info is available here.

King County Increases Sales Tax to Provide More Homeless Housing
The King County Council voted on Oct 13 to approve a 0.1 percent sales tax increase to provide additional homeless housing. The tax is expected to raise $70 million a year and will take effect Jan. 1. The County is taking advantage of an opportunity granted by the state legislature earlier this year, which gave local governments the option to adopt a one-tenth of one percent sales tax increase if the money raised is allocated to address affordable housing. King County is opting to use the additional revenue to purchase hotels, motels, or nursing homes that can then be converted into immediate housing for the homeless. The total amount raised will be less than originally planned, however, as the city councils of eight of the county’s 38 cities voted to reserve the right to increase the sales tax in their cities but to use the money for their own projects. Those cities include Bellevue, Issaquah, North Bend, Maple Valley, Snoqualmie, Renton, Covington, and Kent. AIA supported King County’s action as part of a board coalition led by the Housing Development Consortium.


OPPORTUNITIES

AIA Washington Council’s Advocacy in Action
AIA Washington Council is looking for the next generation of architect advocates! AIA|WA is offering a free, 3-part webinar series on how architects can effectively advocate for the issues that are important to you – whatever you care most about, there’s a way to make a difference. Advocacy in Action will focus on demystifying advocacy, illustrating how to get involved and make an impact on issues such as climate change and housing. The series is designed for emerging professionals and students, but everyone is welcome.  Read more about this series and register here.  You will receive one learning unit for each seminar, and the series is open to all architects and designers in Washington (you do not have to be an AIA member).

Home Electrification Google Group
Interested in residential electrification personally or professionally? Join this Western Washington Home Electrification Google Group to share tips with architects and others who are working through the ins and outs of home electrification.

Fire Code Technical Advisory Group
The State Building Code Council (SBCC) is seeking an architect to serve on the Council’s International Fire Code Technical Advisory Group (TAG) the for the 2021 code adoption cycle (Oct. 2020 – June 2021). Technical Advisory Groups review new editions of the model codes to identify significant changes and review existing and proposed state amendments. Applications to serve on a TAG consist of a letter of interest and a resume, plus an endorsement from AIA Washington Council. For more information, contact Kirsten. You may also contact the SBCC at sbcc@des.wa.gov.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings

The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday of each month at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm via Zoom. The October meeting will be held on Oct. 20, however. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

AIA Seattle Community Engagement Forum – Oct. 19-21
Establishing Meaningful Relationships with Communities You Serve will help you build the knowledge, resources, and skill-sets to form more authentic relationships and coalitions with community and create not only beautiful, functional and successful buildings and spaces, but also transform our profession from one that works for community to one that works with. More info.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Uncategorized

Design After Quarantine Series

Join us for an extended look at how design is impacted by the COVID pandemic.

BACK TO THE OFFICE: RETURN STRATEGIES
June 2020

These town halls, one for medium-large firms and one for small firms, explored how firms and individuals were strategizing about our profession’s move to working from home and a return the office while navigating the COVID pandemic.
Event page (event videos are available here)

FUTURE OF DESIGN
November 2020 – February 2021

Our Future of Design panels will explore how the COVID experience is changing the way we think about and design buildings and spaces. As we try to understand the role of architecture post-pandemic, we’ll look at how design is already changing to accommodate market demands and societal shifts as we adjust to living, working, and staying healthy in our built environment. Our panelists will discuss what they are hearing from clients as well as new ideas, innovations, and best-practices that designers can use to make our built environment healthier, more equitable, and resilient.

Residential
The Future of Residential Design | November 5
We’ll explore the ways in which the look and function of single- and multi-family residences are being altered by the pandemic today and what changes are on the horizon for tomorrow.
Video available via the above link.

Healthcare
The Architecture for Health Committee presents: Looking Back to Look Forward | Nov. 4-6
With a global pandemic, racial injustice, and climate change at the constant forefront of our minds, by now it is clear that we are all living through a major turning point in history. Join us in conversation on what we have learned in the past year and the opportunities to move health care forward together.

Workplace
The Future of the Workplace Design | January 15, 2:00-3:00 pm
Join our panel for a discussion of how the workplace has changed as a result of COVID and what that means for design. More than ever before, architects are being asked to design for occupant health with extended concepts of sustainability. We’ll look at how these strategies are affecting cost of construction, owners’ pro forma analysis, and space utilization and growth projections. We’ll also look at how workplaces themselves are changing, with less focus on a central workspace and a greater emphasis on flexible spaces and working remotely.

Education
The Committee on Architecture for Education presents: The State of Higher Education – A Look at Today and Tomorrow | Jan. 20, 12-1 pm
Join our panel for a discussion on the current realities and what’s next for higher education as institutions and industry experts navigate the evolution of campus together. While the pandemic shone a spotlight on the vulnerabilities that have plagued higher education institutions for years, it also represents an opportunity to improve the system holistically. Our panel will discuss how their campuses are addressing their respective moving targets and share lessons learned and success stories. What didn’t work? What worked? What to try next?

K-12 Design After the Pandemic | February tbd

 

FUTURE OF CITIES
2021
Posted in Uncategorized

2020 Committee & Volunteer Awards

image collage of the AIA Seattle Volunteer Award winners. Names in description

This year we recognize Matt Hutchins AIA; the Seattle Design Festival Core Team; and the Committee on the Environment, co-chairs: Shannon Bunsen and Gaurav Mehta.

AIA Seattle Volunteer Award: Matt Hutchins AIA

Matt Hutchins is a founder and principal of CAST architecture. In that role, Matt has spent more than twenty years working to increase the vitality of the city and the environment. With AIA Seattle, he has been a steadfast advocate and public educator on topics such as abundant urban housing options, backyard cottages, Residential Small Lot Zoning, sustainable building and zoning reform are a large component of his mission. He co-chairs AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and serves on the Public Policy Board, and served in the past on the Housing Design Forum Committee, and co-facilitated the chapter’s ADU tour and City Leader Breakfast.

Design in Public Volunteer Award: Seattle Design Festival Core Team

The Seattle Design Festival is produced by a passionate group of volunteers who shape the Festival each year, and who help hold us accountable to our goals, mission, and vision. Comprised of both design professionals and enthusiasts this group works together for eight months to develop the call for proposals, identify partners, review submissions, and on occasion completely pivot the Festival to virtual platforms. Pictured here are our core 2020 Committee members (clockwise, starting upper left) Elana Darnell, Julia Edwards, Adam Ury, Trevor Dykstra, Lisa Sato, Matt McWilliams, Yasir Altemeemi, George Zatloka, and Uris Giron (not pictured Michelle Gagnon-Creeley).

Committee Award: Committee on the Environment | Co-chairs: Gaurav Mehta and Shannon Bunsen

Formed as an offshoot of the national AIA Committee on the Environment, Seattle’s COTE chapter has worked for well over a decade to promote sustainability, and enhance the environmental performance of the built environment. In the past year, our COTE chapter has collaborated with numerous groups and organizations including Urban Design Forum and Seattle University, and is in-progress on programs with Design & Wellbeing and ASHRAE. Following the arrival of COVID-19, the group has maintained and even grown its network, moving seamlessly into online formats for events like their annual Earth Day Slam, and seminars on equity and renewables, and integrated design. Their leadership has stood at the forefront of AIA Seattle’s committee adaptations during an uncertain time, showing how to effectively transition to the new normal.

Thank you all for your incredible work and high level of leadership and involvement with AIA Seattle!

Join us October 2, 2020 to celebrate the Award Winners at the 2020 President’s Dinner.

Posted in Committee on the Environment, Design In Public, For the Profession, For the Public, Housing, Public Policy Board

AIA Seattle Announces 2020 Honorees

AIA Seattle - 2020 President's Dinner

Honorees are nominated by their peers and selected by the Fellows & Honors committee each spring. AIA Seattle is delighted to recognize these recipients for their exceptional contributions to the profession and our community.

Please join us in congratulating the 2020 Honorees! This year, amidst our many local and global crises, we are committed to celebrating the best of our profession. Our virtual awards program will take place on Friday, October 2, and we look forward to honoring this year’s awardees in-person at the earliest opportunity to do so safely. Click below for details on the program.

Click here to view the recorded awards ceremony and acceptance speeches.

 

2020 HONOREES

Gold Medal

Walter Schacht FAIA

Bald white man in a beige sweater with light blue collar peeking out, smiling and standing in front of an out-of-focus outdoor backgroundWalter Schacht, FAIA has practiced architecture for over thirty years with a central focus on the public realm. He thinks strategically about the relationships between people, place and process. His clearly planned, carefully detailed civic buildings reflect a search for meaning inspired by their community, context and culture. Walter’s partnership with architect Cima Malek-Aslani is the foundation of his practice.

Walter works with his colleagues and clients to promote public policies that advance the profession and the community. He served as AIA Seattle President, on AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board, AIA Washington Council and chaired Washington State’s Capital Projects Advisory Board. In 2013, Walter was inducted into the AIA College of Fellows for his distinguished body of work and activism. In 2015, he received AIA Seattle’s Community Service Award and AIA Washington Council’s Jennie Sue Brown Award for service to the profession.

Young Architect Award

Sarah Haase AIA

Light-skinned women with wavy, light-brown hair smiling and standing in front of a wrought-iron fence

Sarah is an architect interested in designing and advocating for a socially and culturally conscious built environment. A generalist and a strategist, Sarah believes the best designs come from deeply engaging with the users and context of the projects’ communities and environment. Her current work with Schemata Workshop falls under the umbrella of community-based design, with clients such as non-profit affordable housing developers, social service providers, and public transit agencies.

Originally from Germany, she moved to Seattle after graduating with her B. Arch and Minor in Leadership and Social Change from Virginia Tech. Sarah has been advocating for a broader understanding and application of the positive impact of design through organizing the annual Seattle Design Festival, serving on the board of Design in Public, speaking on panels about equitable housing, assisting with Youth Workshops with the Seattle Architecture Foundation, and participating in the Housing Development Consortium’s Affordable Housing Leadership Cohort.

Garrett Reynolds AIA

White man with spiky brown hair, smiling in a white, collared shirt in front of an out-of-focus office backgroundGarrett Reynolds, AIA LEED AP BD+C is an architect at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. His work strives for elegant, clear design solutions that thoughtfully respond to the unique circumstances of place. He takes pride in being a generalist architect with strong interests in building tectonics, conceptual design, and research – all with a focus on craft and detail. His interest in housing of all scales and types has resulted in a highly varied portfolio of work at BCJ and Mithun including a large mixed-use project in Portland’s Pearl District, a significant private residence in Big Sur, and a family retreat in Iowa.

Garrett is highly involved in the Seattle design community. He co-chaired the 2016 Urban Housing Forum and chaired the 2020 Virtual Housing Design Week. He continually strives to incite conversation around Seattle’s livability and positive urban growth strategies. He led BCJ’s submission to the City of Seattle’s DADU Competition and has written numerous articles on the topics of housing, transportation, and urban livability that have been published in ARCADE, Seattle Magazine, and the Daily Journal of Commerce. Garrett received the AIA Seattle Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship in 2015 and the Donald and Joanna Sunshine Architecture Fellow Alumni Award in 2020.

Honorary AIA Seattle Membership

Casey Schuchart

Man in suit with red tie, in front of glass backgroundCasey is a fifth-generation construction professional whose career has been honed through time spent working in the field, estimating, project engineering, project management, and division management roles. He was instrumental in the delivery of the Bullitt Center; a six-story office building deemed the ‘greenest’ commercial building in the world. As the President of Schuchart, Casey leads the team through the execution of business initiatives and strategies. Casey earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of San Diego and an MBA from Seattle University. Casey currently serves as the immediate Past President for the Seattle Architecture Foundation, while also serving as a board member for the Seattle Aquarium and the Lakeside Alumni Board.

 

 

Ellen Sollod

Gray-haired woman in black jacket in front of tri-color background

Ellen Sollod is a civic artist and activist who has worked to integrate art into the public realm for over four decades–as an artist, policy maker, art planner and administrator.

Her public art can be found throughout the Pacific Northwest in light rail stations, streetscapes, bridges, parks, plazas, educational facilities and even a waste water treatment plant. Her permanent works are deeply rooted in the site, often referencing its hidden history.

As an art planner, Ellen has laid the groundwork for many other artists to bring their artistic vision to life.

As a policy maker, she served on the Seattle Design Commission, Seattle Public Art Advisory Committee and as the Executive Director of the Seattle Arts Commission.

Ellen was a NAIUSI fellow and has received awards from Allied Arts and 4 Culture.

She has maintained throughout her practice a deep and abiding commitment to the public realm and to collaboration with design teams and the community.

Marshall Foster

Brown-haired man in a jacket, over open-collar blue shirt, in front of outdoor backgroundMarshall Foster is the Director of Seattle’s Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects (OWCP). OWCP leads the “Waterfront Seattle” program, which is creating 20 acres of new parks and public spaces on Seattle’s Central Waterfront, and is supporting the Pike Place Market and Seattle Aquarium in completing major expansions. The Office is also leading efforts around the redevelopment of Key Arena and Memorial Stadium at Seattle Center.

Prior to that Marshall served as the Seattle’s Planning Director from 2009 through 2014, where he oversaw plans for South Lake Union’s expansion, along with community plans for the Rainier Valley, Capitol Hill, the University District and Northgate. He holds a Master’s Degree in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley, and lives with his wife and two children in West Seattle.

Greg Briggs

Light brown hair man in suit-and-tie in front of mute backgroundGreg Briggs grew up the son of a civil engineer and was exposed to engineering as an early teen working at his dad’s firm. Fascinated with the design of buildings led him to get his master’s degree in Structures from North Carolina State after receiving his BSCE from Oklahoma State. As a structural engineering consultant for over 30 years primarily in Seattle, he has had the opportunity to work on many significant projects and with several great architects in Seattle and across the globe. His project types have varied from museums, performing arts, institutional and historic renovations as well as many others. He recently served as the principal engineer-of-record on the landmark Climate Pledge Arena renovation project.

The Islandwood project on Bainbridge Island was pivotal early in his career in understanding sustainable design and the role of the structural engineer. This inspired him to become a founding member of the Structural Engineering Institute’s Sustainability Committee and authoring articles and co-authoring a book, as well as lecturing on the topic.

Community Service Award

Richard Browning AIA

Smiling grey-haired man in green/brown sweater, in front of black background

Rick Browning is a fourth generation Floridian who ran far away from home and then spent his career as an architect and activist trying to protect the Pacific NW from the environmental degradation he had witnessed in the Sunshine State.

With his own Portland based firm he worked on projects such as the retrofit of all seven non-freeway Willamette River bridges for better bike, pedestrian and disabled user access. He chaired the committee which oversaw Portland’s first Bicycle Masterplan and served on myriad other committees and task forces.

In Seattle, Rick chaired the Chapter’s Urban Design Forum and more recently the Chapter’s Transportation Task Force. He also served on both the Chapter’s governing Board and Public Policy Board. Pro bono work has included spearheading a task force to create an Urban Design Element for the City’s Comp Plan and many individual battles to equitably repurpose public right-of-way.

Allied Organization Award

Housing Development Consortium

Multiracial, mixed-gender group of people posed in front of a blue sheet, smilingFounded in 1988 by 10 Seattle-area nonprofit housing providers, HDC’s membership has grown over the last 32 years to encompass all the major affordable housing developers, financial institutions, architects, general contractors, attorneys, accountants, service providers, public housing authorities, and government agencies, working in the affordable housing space in King County, Washington. United around our shared vision – “That all people live with dignity in safe, healthy, and affordable homes within communities of opportunity” – our membership-based network collaborates effectively to provide a wide range of stable and affordable housing opportunities for our region’s low income and most vulnerable residents. Each night, more than 125,000 individuals go home to more than 45,000 affordable homes created or preserved by HDC members. By bringing together organizations, government agencies, and businesses around shared values, we are better positioned to support the sector’s ability to make a positive, community-wide impact. Guided by our members and volunteer Board of Directors, we weave a powerful network of strategic alliances across sectors and industries to respond to diverse community needs and provide capacity-building, networking, and advocacy opportunities all geared toward creating a sector that is more equitable, productive, efficient, and effective as good stewards of public resources.

Emerging Professionals Travel Scholarship

Queena Yi Assoc. AIA

smiling, sandy-haired woman in black sweatervest, in front of green treesQueena Yi, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is an architectural designer with over six years of experience and is anticipating licensure this year. Her previous work experience at Katerra and Perkins + Will, where she managed senior housing projects and a WeWork | WeLive project, provided the foundation for this Travel Scholarship proposal. Previous to pursuing a career in architecture, Queena worked for over a decade at various startup tech companies in San Francisco and Seattle. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the University of California at San Diego and an M.Arch from the University of Washington. During her studies at the UW, Queena received a Scan Design Fellowship to study at the Royal Danish Academy in Copenhagen for one year. Her time in Copenhagen provided the groundwork for her thesis project, Memento Mori | A Non-Sectarian Memorial Site in Seattle, which was later selected for the AIA 2015 Emerging Professionals Exhibit. Queena has been active in the design community by participating in the UW PAC, Design in Public, and Seattle Architecture Foundation at various capacities.

View the 2020 Travel Scholarship announcement for more information about Queena’s proposal.

REGIONAL & NATIONAL HONORS

2019 Regional Emerging Firm Award

Best Practice

Black-and-white photo; man on left in a zipfront hooded sweatshirt and goatee; woman on left with buzzcut, and striped, shortsleeve shirtBest Practice is a design-intensive firm located in Seattle, WA. Despite our size (we are 8) and relatively young age as an office (founded in 2011), we relish tackling a diverse range of work, from small boutiques or residences to large scale offices & cultural projects. We believe that meaningful design is a balance between inspiration and the real-life needs of each project. From there, intuitive and experiential design often emerges. Our strength lies in our ability to creatively collaborate – with each other, with our fabricators, with our clients, all to provide innovative solutions that explore the precarious balance between function, content and beauty.

We are very fortunate to have a close working relationship with many local designers, artists, scientists and engineers… seeking like-minded people to partner with on project components is one of the best parts of working in a city like Seattle. These talented individuals lend their craft and insight to our projects, helping us realize a vision that provides a measure of unique, locally crafted feeling in all of our works. While we like to dream big with our work, we are no strangers to the realities of budget & time, and affirm that organization, planning and proper procedures help produce successful projects.

2019 Regional Firm Awards

Weinstein A+U

Group photo outdoors in clear-blue sky; multi-gender group with hands raised in celebration on a rooftopWeinstein A+U is a 25-person generalist architectural firm located in Seattle Washington. Founded by Ed Weinstein in 1977, the firm provides comprehensive design services on a broad array of building types including education, social service, institutional, public sector, public safety, commercial, mixed-use, multi-family residential, single family residential, adaptive re-use, and urban design. By integrating an urban design perspective, the firm is especially effective in the design of complex urban projects.

Our work is rational, intelligible, and straightforward. We combine rigorous site and program analysis with a disciplined design process. We endeavor to design buildings that fit their circumstances, earn broad community support, are constructed efficiently and cost effectively, and serve as exemplars for design excellence.

We are especially proud that the recognition for design excellence that we have received for such diverse projects testifies to the significance of our fundamental mission: to design thoughtful buildings that reflect the values of the communities we serve.

2020 Young Architect Award

JoAnn Hindmarsh Wilcox AIA

2020 Honorary AIA

Lisa Richmond Hon. AIA

2020 Associates Award

Stacey Crumbaker Assoc. AIA

View the 2020 National Awards announcement for more information.

2020 AIA College of Fellows

Chris Eseman FAIA
Dave Goldberg FAIA
Christopher Meek FAIA IES

View the 2020 Fellows announcement for more information.


THANK YOU TO OUR 2020 PRESIDENT’S DINNER SPONSOR

President's Dinner Sponsors - Integral Group logo

Posted in Fellows and Honors, For the Profession

Advocacy Update – August 2020

Its About Time - Housing

FEDERAL NEWS

AIA National Policy Platform
AIA National has released a federal policy platform in advance of this year’s presidential elections. General categories include:

  • A future economy
  • Climate action
  • Healthy and equitable communities

STATE NEWS

Clean Energy Transformation Act
The Washington Department of Commerce has released its second set of draft rules for the state’s Clean Energy Transformation Act (CETA) (SB 5116, 2019), which commits Washington to an electricity supply free of greenhouse gas emissions by 2045. Written comments from the public are due by Sept. 14. More info about CETA and the draft is available here. AIA Washington Council supported this legislation in 2019 but has not taken an active role in the rulemaking as it does not directly relate to AIA’s built environment-related climate priorities.

Clean Building Performance Standards
Washington’s Clean Buildings Act (HB 1257, 2019) requires the Department of Commerce to develop a state energy performance standard for commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet. After a year of stakeholder input, the proposed rules are expected to be published on Sept. 2. Additional input will be solicited as part of a public hearing process, with the final rules established by Nov. 1. AIA|WA will hold a webinar to explain the new rules in November. More info on the state’s Clean Buildings program here.


LOCAL NEWS

Bike Parking Changes in SDCI Omnibus Bill
The Seattle City Council’s Land Use & Neighborhoods Committee approved omnibus legislation related to SDCI that included changes to bike parking requirements for affordable housing. These changes reflect significant lobbying by Seattle’s bike lobby and affordable housing advocates. Subject to approval by full Council, the changes would:

  • Restore short-term bike parking requirements for affordable housing.
  • Limit the exemption from bike parking requirements for affordable housing to only projects serving 30 percent AMI and below (permanent supportive housing).
  • Remove the proposed bike parking exemption for 30-60 percent AMI affordable housing projects.
  • Allow the SDCI Director to waive bike parking requirements for 30-60 percent AMI affordable housing projects if:
    • The waiver would allow more affordable units to be produced.
    • Reasonable alternatives for bike storage are provided; authorizes SDCI and SDOT to promulgate a joint Director’s Rule to define reasonable alternatives.
  • Clarify that the SDCI Director can waive bike parking for non-profit senior housing or housing for persons with disabilities, regardless of whether it is in a congregate residence.
  • Limit the number of stair steps to access bicycle parking, whether interior or exterior, to five.

SDCI Rolls Out Virtual Design Review Board Meetings
SDCI has begun a gradual rollout of virtual Design Review Board meetings for Early Design Guidance meetings only and plans to reassess the process for all projects in September. More info is available here.

SDCI Virtual Inspections Survey
SDCI is seeking users of its virtual inspection process to complete a brief survey on their experience. SDCI is also seeking users to participate as stakeholders on its Virtual Inspections Project team. More info here.

2018 Code Updates
REMINDER: the 2018 Seattle Construction Code adoption is delayed until Feb. 1, 2021 to match the state’s adoption schedule. Seattle is holding public meetings to discuss the Seattle Energy Code amendments, providing local stakeholders with an opportunity to further improve the amended language. Contact Kirsten if you would like to attend any of the following sessions:

  • Thursday, August 27, 9:30 AM – 12:00: General, Envelope, Lighting & Electrical
  • Thursday, September 10, 9:30 AM – 12:00: C406 Efficiency Credits & C407 Modeling
  • Thursday, September 17, 9:30 AM – 12:00: Mechanical & water heating
  • Thursday, September 24, 9:30 AM – 12:00: As required for unresolved issues

Written comments may also be sent to Duane Jonlin FAIA.

Bellevue Reduces Parking Rules for Affordable Housing Near Transit
The Bellevue City Council approved of Ordinance 6513, imposing reduced parking standards for affordable housing developments near transit. AIA Seattle has supported removing or eliminating parking requirements in areas served by frequent transit to boost affordable and other housing in areas where residents are less likely to own cars.

Portland’s Residential Infill Project Passes
Portland passed comprehensive zoning reform on Aug. 11, allowing four homes to be built on any residential lot in the city and up to six homes per lot if at least half the homes are affordable to low-income residents. The reforms, called the Residential Infill Project, also remove parking mandates from 75 percent of the city’s residential land and increase allowable lot coverage for buildings over one unit – duplexes will be allowed to three-fifths the square footage of their lot and triplexes and fourplexes up to 0.7.

AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and its Public Policy Board are working to strengthen AIA’s efforts to promote flexibility in single family zones. The Housing Task Force has established a Slack channel to engage AIA members in conversation around re-imaging single family zoning. Contact Kirsten if you are interested in participating in the Housing Task Force or the Slack channel.


OPPORTUNITIES

ADU Showcase
AIA’s ADU Showcase, the online version of our cancelled ADU Tour, is accepting applications. Projects must be built, designed by an AIA member, and located in one of AIA Seattle’s operating counties. Firms/sole practitioners are limited to one entry each.  More info is available here.


EVENTS

Seattle Design Festival: It’s About Time We House Everyone
Join AIA’s Housing Task Force for an interactive exploration of missing middle housing (and more) in Seattle or your city. Check out our examples and add your own housing finds. Join the conversation as we strive for a more equitable, livable, and sustainable city for all. Website here. Check out all Seattle Design Festival events here.

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design is closed until the governor’s Stay Home Stay Healthy order is lifted. All meetings and events are either canceled or moved to an online or conference call format. Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Tuesday at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force is meeting on an ad hoc basis via Zoom. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

Embodied Carbon 101 (Boston Society of Architects): Process + firm culture
Monday, August 24 from 12-1 pm PDT. With moderator Barbra Batshalom (Sustainable Performance Institute) and speakers Colin Booth (Placetailor), Steven Burke (Consigli), Amy Hattan (Thornton Tomasetti), Andrea Love (Payette), and Kimberly Seigel (Perkins+Will). Register here.  See the BSA’s embodied carbon series recorded events here.

GoGreen Virtual Conference Seattle
Sept. 8-9. More info.

Zero Carbon Conference: Scaling our Decarbonized Future – International Living Future Institute
Online Oct. 7-8  More info.

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

2020 Honor Awards

AIA Seattle Honor Awards for Washington Architecture 3x2

The Honor Awards for Washington Architecture is AIA Seattle’s annual marquee program, drawing hundreds of attendees to an event of unique rigor and breadth. This nationally-recognized program provides an important opportunity for the design community to share and celebrate its achievements, both among practitioners and with the community-at-large. Award winners were revealed for the first time at the live event. This year was AIA Seattle’s 70th Annual Honor Awards, with the first-ever virtual program and accompanying publication.


CATALOGUE

The 2020 Honor Awards for Washington Architecture left us with a lot to celebrate! We had a blast on the red carpet for our first-ever virtual live event celebrating 20 award winners and our greater design community.

Now, we are thrilled to share the first-ever AIA Seattle Honor Awards Catalogue!

In this publication, you will find…
– A letter from fashionable co-hosts and Honor Awards Committee Co-chairs Kevin Snook and Ming-Lee Yuan;
– The full list of submitted projects and firm names for this year’s awards;
– A closer look at the Energy in Design Award and the 17 qualifying projects;
– Hallmark spreads for each awarded project, including juror quotes for the winners of Award of Honor, Energy in Design, and Award of Merit;
– Features from our 2020 Honor Awards sponsors highlighting their relationship to the Honor Awards and more!

 


View the full list of submitted projects here:

Click here for online gallery


JURY CONSIDERATIONS

Every year, jurors praise submissions that reveal the story behind the marketing images. What concepts and considerations drove the design? What were the challenges and opportunities along the way? How did the design team arrive at the solution? Submitters are encouraged to use the project narrative, captions, and inclusion of process work as opportunities to tell a design story.

In addition to the jury’s own criteria, the AIA Seattle community has identified four considerations for the submission review process:

  • Inspiration | How does the project manifest its stated intent–in form and function–revealing innovation in both thought and practice?
  • Problem-solving | How does the project creatively address challenges inherent in its site, budget, program, materials, collaboration, and context? What are the organizing principles informing design?
  • Environmental Sensitivity | How does the project exhibit serious intent to minimize negative environmental impact and enhance its relationship to the environment?
  • Social Impact | How does the project enhance the community in which it is situated? How does it help promote a vibrant and equitable community?

Additionally, the newly introduced Common App offers BUILT project submitters Ten Measures for Design Excellence to consider in telling the project story.


MEET THE JURY

Marsha Maytum, FAIA, LEED AP | Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects | San Francisco

Marsha Maytum FAIA, LEED AP, is a founding Principal at Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects (LMS) in San Francisco, winner of the 2017 National AIA Architecture Firm Award. Marsha has focused her career on community, cultural, and socially-responsible projects that promote sustainable design, including the creation of new buildings, rehabilitation of historic buildings, and adaptive reuse of existing structures. LMS has received over 175 regional, national and international design awards, including ten AIA COTE Top Ten projects. Marsha is a frequently invited juror and critic and has lectured nationally on the topics of sustainable design and adaptive reuse. She is a member of the National AIA Committee on the Environment Advisory Group, and served as its 2019 Chair. Marsha has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Oregon, the University of California, Berkeley and California College of the Arts.

Pascale Sablan, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP | S9ARCHITECTURE | Beyond the Built Environment, LLC | New York

With over 13 years of experience, Pascale Sablan has been on the team for a variety of mixed-use, commercial, cultural & residential projects in the U.S. and globally. Currently a Senior Associate at S9ARCHITECTURE in New York. Pascale is the 315th living African-American female registered architect in the U.S. She is an activist architect who works to advance architecture for the betterment of society, bring visibility and voice to the issues concerning women and diverse designers. She founded the Beyond the Built Environment organization positioned to uniquely address the inequitable disparities in architecture. She was awarded the 2018 Pratt Alumni Achievement Award, BD+C 40 Under 40; featured on the cover of the 09/2017 issue. Pascale is a 2018 AIA National Young Architects Award Recipient. Pascale has given lectures at Colleges and Universities nationally; cultural institutions such as the United Nations and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

 

Tatiana Bilbao | Tatiana Bilbao ESTUDIO | Mexico City

Tatiana Bilbao began her eponymous studio in 2004 with the aim of integrating social values, collaboration and sensitive design approaches to architectural work. Prior to founding her firm, Bilbao was an Advisor in the Ministry of Development and Housing of the Government of the Federal District of Mexico City, during this period she was part of the General Development Directorate of the Advisory Council for Urban Development in the City. The work of the office intersects with research allowing to design for diverse circumstances and in reconstruction or crisis scenarios. Bilbao holds a recurring teaching position at Yale University School of Architecture and has taught at Harvard University GSD, AA Association in London, Columbia University GSAPP, Rice University, University of Andrés Bello in Chile, and Peter Behrens School of Arts at HS Dusseldorf in Germany. Her work has been published in The New York Times, A + U, Domus, among others. Bilbao has been recognized with the Kunstpreis Berlin in 2012, was named in 2010 as an Emerging Voice by the Architecture League of New York, the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture Prize by the LOCUS Foundation in 2014, as well as the Impact Award 2017 Honorees for ArchitzierA + Awards, Tau Sigma Delta Gold Medal of 2020 and the Marcus Prize Award 2019.


YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Initiated in 2018, the Young Voices Selection (YVS) program aims to elevate and engage the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. Three young designers, nominated by firm leaders within AIA Seattle’s Firm Network and selected by the Honor Awards Committee, will be given the opportunity to review, deliberate, and select ONE Built project submission. This chosen project, the “Young Voices Selection,” will be recognized at the (virtual) live event and selected by this year’s Young Voices…


QUESTIONS?

Questions about the (Virtual) Live Event? Contact AIA Seattle Program & Event Coordinator, Zoe Guckenheimer.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Seattle Associate Director, Growth & Operations, Kristen Lound.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2020 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Posted in For the Profession, Honor Awards, Uncategorized

2020 Northwest Washington Design Awards

AIA Northwest Washington’s Steering Committee invites you to share your most dynamic, new work!

Join us as we celebrate the best architectural designs available from the AIA members in Whatcom, Skagit, Island, and San Juan Counties for the Northwest Washington Design Awards. These projects represent the finest standards in sustainability, innovation, building performance, and overall integration with client and surrounding community.

The awards presentation will follow the keynote speaker presentation: Who has the Power to be Inclusive? by Karen Braitmayer FAIA, founder of Studio Pacifica, and world-renowned accessibility expert and 2019 Whitney M Young, Jr. Award winner.

Join us for this timely and essential conversation about equity in design! It is a rare opportunity to hear Karen’s perspective on the issues we deal with every day.

Karen will be sharing with us her view on who has the power to be inclusive in Architecture. Is it the press, who can influence the vision of what is beautiful design? Is it the architecture schools, who help create that pipeline to the profession? Is it the profession as an agent of change or the architect themselves as the ultimate control of who is included in the design process, the team, and the creator of the design? Please join us as we explore these topics as well as Karen’s insight on accessibility within the profession.

Don’t miss it!


HOW TO SUBMIT

Call for Submissions opens: August 3, 2020
Submission Deadline: DEADLINE EXTENDED to September 8, 2020 at 5pm PDT

We invite you to submit to AIA Northwest Washington’s 2020 Design Awards. The intent of the Design Awards is to encourage excellence in architectural design and planning and to provide an avenue through which architects may gain recognition by their peers and the public. The ultimate goal is to raise the standards of architectural design excellence by both the architectural community and the public. We encourage you to join the conversation and tell your design story.

Submission deadline: September 8 at 5:00pm PDT. Finalize and complete payment before this deadline.

Please submit for the following categories:

  • Residential
  • Commercial
  • Unbuilt Project

Submission Fee: $150 for first project submitted, $100 for each additional project. (If submitting multiple projects, submit each project separately.)

Complete this application and upload the four (4) described documents to the below link.
**This application sheet details all submission requirements, and includes a form that you will submit to the below link.

SUBMISSIONS CLOSED

**At the discretion of the AIA NWW Design Awards Committee, late submissions may be accepted after 5:00pm PDT on September 3, and a late submission fee will be applied. No fees will be refunded for submissions that are disqualified or incomplete.


VIRTUAL EVENT ON OCTOBER 15

The Northwest Washington Design Awards is a marquee program, drawing over 100 attendees and featuring an awards presentation and keynote presentation. Full details on the virtual program can be found here. This program provides an essential occasion for the San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom county architecture community to celebrate its progress and growth within itself, and in conversation with the community at-large.

Click here to register


QUESTIONS?

Questions about Submitting? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Coordinator, Karen Bacon.

Questions about attending the Virtual Event? Contact AIA Seattle Member Engagement Manager, Connor Descheemaker.

Sponsorship Questions? Contact AIA Northwest Washington Steering Committee chair, Dave Christensen.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2020 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Special thanks to our 2020 Design Awards sponsors - TFWB Engineers, GeoEngineers, Lund Opsahl, Dawson, FSi Consulting Engineers, The Greenbusch Group Inc., Ram Construction, HKP Architects, Judd & Black Appliance

Posted in AIA Northwest Washington

AIA Seattle Racial Justice Commitments

Racial Justice Commitments graphic

As AIA Seattle reflects on our pursuit of racial justice, we are committing to a process of transparency in what measurable actions we are taking. As a member-led organization, we are establishing this evolving list for the sake of mutual accountability — so you may see what we are doing, and tell us where we should be moving in the future.

  • In support of our stated equity, diversity, and inclusion goals, AIA Seattle now has a policy that women, non-binary people, or trans people and people of color will be represented in all continuing education programs (including all panel discussions when more than two speakers are invited). This month, the Board of Directors approved a policy that AIA Seattle will no longer host or promote CE programs where the speakers are all cis-men or all white.
  • In June 2020, AIA Seattle began a partnership with UW College of the Built EnvironmentPlanning in Color, and NOMA Northwest, to create action-oriented group conversations toward racial justice. The first session, held June 30, focused on establishing the current state of the architecture profession around racial equity, and included a series of lightning talks and group discussions to establish topics for future bimonthly group discussions in the year ahead. This group is actively working on continued events in this series. Stay tuned for those to get finalized and on the calendar this fall.
  • In June 2020, AIA Seattle compiled a collective list of Racial Justice Resources centered on direct action, education, engagement, and uplifting Black-led organizations and efforts with the through-line of design, architecture, and space. This list has continued to get updated and we invite our members and community to contribute to the collective dialogue, learning, and action.
  • Our Chapter Joins American Institute of Architects in Condemning Anti-Asian Violence and Hate. The AIA issued this statement on March 17, 2021. These violent attacks and hateful mindsets are not new, but the current surge is disturbing. We encourage our members to reach out to colleagues and contacts who may be hurting. Be there to listen and find ways to support them. We’ve added a place to report incidents of violence, harassment, discrimination as well as a site for additional reading, resources, statistics, and ways to support the Asian community to our Racial Justice Resources list.
  • We acknowledge that we operate on unceded lands of various nations of Coast Salish peoples, most locally the federally-unacknowledged Duwamish, who still live and produce on this land. As an organization focused on creating and sustaining a better built environment, and a culture of design that fosters equitable, resilient, and thriving communities, we recognize that we are guests on this land, and are seeking to become better stewards, paying rent to Real Rent Duwamish.
  • In 2019, AIA Seattle piloted the Intercultural Leadership Program (ILP) to support equity, diversity, and inclusion goals, with the specific vision that the AEC professions will have a culture of attracting, retaining, and promoting women, non-binary people, and people of color. As a part of the intensive ILP trainings, our staff, the board, and a cohort of 30 members completed the Intercultural Development Index (IDI) assessment which illuminated our organizational tendency to minimize cultural differences. In dominant culture groups, minimization is primarily motivated by comfort, and the desire to focus on common ground. While well-intentioned, we know the impact of this can be harmful. ‘This is how we do things here’ rather than getting curious and excited about different ways of doing. Since the ILP program, AIA Seattle has been focused on cultural self-awareness, noticing and naming differences that make a difference, and understanding power dynamics. As we work to move toward the mindsets of acceptance and adaptation, we are growing our capacity to support a more just, equitable, diverse, and inclusive profession.
  • AIA Seattle facilitates the Diversity Roundtable committee, begun in 1986. This group hosts year-round a variety of racial justice-centric programming, including the Architects in Schools program and the annual Solstice event, focused on celebrating diversity in the profession.
  • Along with our Diversity Roundtable committee’s Architecture in School program, AIA Seattle annually sponsors the ACE Mentorship program at the $1,000 level, and Seattle Architecture Foundation at the $2,500 level to support their work with K-12 students learning all about the architecture, engineering, and construction professions and our collective goal of promoting a robust pipeline of diverse emerging architects.
  • AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board is critically reevaluating the policy issues AIA works on with an intentional racial justice and social justice lens. We are adding a race and social justice section to all of our policy position statements to ensure we are answering important questions related to who is telling the story, who makes the decisions, who benefits and how, and how will this build or shift power.
As we establish new protocols, goals, and activities, we will add them to the top of this list. Have suggestions? Please contact us at info@aiaseattle.org or raise a resolution for our Public Policy Board or Board of Directors to consider via one of our member committees.
Posted in Uncategorized

YAF + UDF Release Design Competition

The Young Architects Forum and Urban Design Forum recently released a design competition that is live now! This competition seeks ideas and proposals for incrementally reshaping our region’s automobile-centric areas towards walking and transit. The competition is open to anyone from anywhere and we hope to showcase the work in a publication and open a discussion about the future of Seattle’s development.

Click here to view a recording of this program’s Seattle Design Festival panel discussion.

Visit regionofshortdistances2020.wordpress.com/ for more information! Sign up for updates here!

Posted in Urban Design Forum, Young Architects Forum Tagged with: , , , ,

It’s About Time We House Everyone

Seattle needs more homes, of all shapes and sizes, for more of our neighbors. AIA Seattle is working to shape policies that rethink the city’s majority single-family zoned areas, which have often restricted access for communities of color, renters, low-income residents, and others these zones were created in the 1950s. We must provide more housing in these zones, connecting people to jobs and transit for a more equitable city. Luckily, there are great options for adding housing that fits into existing single family neighborhoods, providing homes for seniors, immigrants, 20-somethings, teachers, retail workers, those currently unhoused, and many more. These housing types, often called “missing middle,” include duplexes/triplexes/quads (‘plexes), courtyard apartments, cottage clusters.

Missing middle housing integrates a wider range of housing into existing neighborhoods as a modest strategy to meet growing urban housing needs. These types are compatible in scale with single-family homes and provide housing options along a spectrum of affordability to support walkable communities, locally-serving retail, and public transportation options.

Infill housing options currently exist in Seattle’s single-family zones and include accessory dwelling units (ADUs) and detached accessory dwelling units (DADUs). Other options require us to think beyond our current zoning policies, looking forward and backward in time for what else is possible. Seattle communities like Wallingford, the Central District, and Queen Anne historically developed as streetcar neighborhoods with diverse multifamily housing styles built along transit lines. Although the streetcar is now history, relics and modern improvisations on grandfathered-in missing middle housing can be found intermixed within and at the edges of single-family zones. For this program, we’ve added in townhouses/rowhouses and live/work spaces, which typically exist within low-rise (less than 4 story) multifamily residential and mixed-use zones, to help us see where residential density exists today and how it might change in the future.

 

Seattle Design Festival: Your Mission

Learn more about missing middle housing in Seattle – where we’ve been, where we are, and where we need to go – while making discoveries of your own and helping to build a group-sourced map of housing alternatives that provide more options for everyone in our cities. Join AIA’s Housing Task Force for an interactive exploration of missing middle (or just more dense) housing in Seattle or wherever you live. Check out our examples and add your own finds. Join the conversation as we strive for a more equitable, livable, and sustainable city for all. It’s about time we house everyone!

Things you can do:

  • Check out our reading list on missing middle housing..
  • Help construct our map of missing middle housing locations in your neighborhood or city – see below.
  • Get creative by imagining other “middle housing” possibilities for our neighborhoods. Photograph inspiring existing homes and designs or draw/paint/collage and label what you would like to see and tag @thirdplacedesigncoop on Instagram. Don’t forget to follow us!

Start Mapping!
Help us track down missing middle housing and other alternatives to detached single family homes in your neighborhood or other neighborhoods across your city. This challenge asks you to head outside (please wear a mask!) to capture photos of ADUs/DADUs*, ‘plexes, courtyard apartments, cottage clusters, townhouses/rowhouses and live/work spacesy. Take photos and send us the GPS coordinates (you can use a free GPS app such as GPS Camera 55) or the street address.

Here’s what to look for:

1. ADUs/DADUs*
2. ‘Plexes (duplexes, triplexes, quads, multi-plexes (5+)
3. Courtyard Apartments
4. Cottage Clusters or Bungalow Courts
5. Live-work units
6. Townhouses/Rowhouses
7. Create your own example!

Click on the map below to see examples. Email your photos to Kirsten at kirstens@aiaseattle.org. We’ll map your find here and give you credit. Prizes for the number of finds, the most difficult to find (cottage housing!), the most creative finds, and more will be awarded.

Find these in your community!  Send your pics and location info to: kirstens@aiaseattle.org

*Disclaimer
DADUs are by definition in someone’s backyard. Please do not trespass to capture your DADU photo. Many DADUs are visible from side angles or via an alley behind the house. When in doubt … find another DADU!

 

Posted in Design In Public, For the Public

Missing Middle Housing Reading List

The Housing Imperative

Nine Totally Necessary Evolutionary Changes for Seattle’s Residential Neighborhoods     The Urbanist     4.16.20

Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving     Washington Post     12.9.17

Bring Back Missing Middle Housing     AARP     2019

History of Seattle Zoning: This Is How You Slow-Walk into a Housing Shortage     Sightline     5.23.2018

Single Detached House Zoning

It’s Time to End Single-Family Zoning    Journal of the American Planning Association     12.6.2019

Lessons from Oregon’s Missing Middle Success      Sightline     11.4.19

How Minneapolis Ended Single-Family Zoning     The Century Foundation     10.24.2019

How Seattle Designed Neighborhood Plans to Inhibit Inclusivity     The Urbanist      10.17.19

Washington Legislature Opts for Incentives Over Mandates to Promote Housing Density in HB 1923     The Urbanist     5.14.19

Cities Start to Question an American Ideal: A House With a Yard on Every Lot     New York Times     6.18.19

Americans Need More Neighbors     New York Times     6.15.19

Is it Time to Ditch 1950’s Era Single-Family Zoning?     The Urbanist     12.4.18

Rapidly growing Seattle constrains new housing through widespread single-family zoning     Seattle Times     5.10.18

ADUs

Will Wall Street invade Seattle’s single-family neighborhoods? Not likely, experts say     Crosscut     7.18.20

ADUs In, McMansions Out, and Could Fourplexes Be Next?     The Urbanist     7.2.2019

Washington Just Advanced the Nation’s Best ADU Reform. Here’s Why It’ll Help.     Sightline     2/28/2019

Seattle Planning Commission Reports

Neighborhoods for All     Fall 2018

Evolving Seattle’s Growth Strategy     Winter 2020

Rectifying Seattle’s racist past requires a denser future, says report     Crosscut     12.12.2018

Architects as Advocates

Elevating the Role of Architects as Advocates for Equitable Housing     Next City     9.20.18

Resources

Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections: Zoning

Posted in Uncategorized

2020-21 Board of Directors

AIA Seattle’s Board Nominating Committee is pleased to present this slate of accomplished members to fill open seats on our Board of Directors beginning September 1, 2020. Voting opened July 13 and closes on August 3, 2020. All AIA and Associate AIA members are eligible to vote. You can vote yes or no for each nominee, and write-in votes are allowed. Voting by at least 10% of the membership is required to validate an election.

Your vote enters you to win a $50 gift certificate to the Intentionalist Marketplace!

Click here to vote

Myer Harrell AIA – President-Elect
Member since: 2006

Myer Harrell HeadshotMyer is a Principal at Weber Thompson, a mid-size multidisciplinary architecture and design firm in Seattle. As the firm’s Director of Sustainability, he manages the firm’s building performance initiatives including participation in the AIA 2030 Commitment. His current project focus is as the architectural project manager for urban commercial office projects, including three buildings pursuing Living Building Challenge Petal Certification. Myer was named the 2011 AIA Seattle Young Architect, and currently serves on the AIA Seattle board of directors and the AIA Continuing Education committee. He received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture with Philosophy citation at the University of Maryland in 2002, a Master in Architecture at the University of Washington in 2005, and completed a Commercial Real Estate Certificate at UW in 2016. He has co-instructed undergraduate and graduate architecture studios at UW and currently contributes as a guest lecturer and studio critic.

Statement of Interest: AIA is the voice of the architecture profession, and as one of the larger chapters, AIA Seattle regularly exhibits leadership within the Institute. Through top-notch programming we discuss and advocate for relevant issues of housing and homelessness, sustainable and low-carbon design, responsible transportation, resilience, and community engagement, among many other topics. I am constantly humbled by the knowledge, experience, and passion of member volunteers, and I admire the tireless work of staff. In recent years we have started good work in equity, diversity, and inclusion, but there is still much to be done. Pervasive systems of racial oppression continue to plaque our region and our nation. We won’t have a truly just profession until the identities of architectural graduates, licensed architects, firm leaders, etc. reflect the identities of the general population. And, we must affect change while we adapt to a world being changed in real time by the current global pandemic.

Carrie Anderson AIA – Director
Member since: 2020

Carrie Anderson AIACarrie Anderson has sixteen years of experience in custom residential architecture in the Puget Sound region, from small remodels and additions to multi-million-dollar new construction. She received her bachelor’s degree from University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee in 2002 and graduate degree from University of Washington in 2006. Since that time, she has been a passionate advocate for sustainability as an active member of the Northwest EcoBuilding Guild and International Living Future Institute. Carrie has presented at the Northwest Green Building Slam & Summit as well as the Northwest Green Home Tour. When not social distancing, Carrie is an avid sailor and softball player. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Seattle Times, Luxe Magazine and numerous other publications.

Statement of Interest: I am excited to serve on the AIA Seattle Board in order to get off the sidelines and take a proactive role in advocating for the issues I’m passionate about including, but not limited to climate change, social justice and equality. I’m also eager to represent my friends and colleagues in the industry by listening to their concerns and bringing them to the attention of the board.

Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA – Director
Member since: 2015

Whitney Lewis headshotWhitney Lewis is an East Coast native who’s called the West Coast home for the last 10 years and Washington state the last 5. After relocating to the Seattle area in 2015, she has been focused in the multi-family housing market specifically affordable housing. Currently, Whitney volunteers as one of the co-chair’s of AIA Seattle’s Diversity Roundtable where she is working to promote the committee locally and at a national level. Whitney is also finishing a three year term as a member of the Membership Steering Committee. When not volunteering, Whitney has been working at GGLO within their affordable housing group for the last year and a half. In and outside of work she seeks to make connections to encourage and promote diversity and equity in architecture and the built environment.

Statement of Interest: I have been a member of AIA Seattle’s Diversity Roundtable for the last five years, first working to better understand my role and how I can get involved and then how I can utilize and connect not only myself but committee members to one another so that together we can make real change. I’ve seen this as a co-chair of Diversity Roundtable and membership steering committee member. Within Diversity Roundtable, my mission has been to continue to promote the committee locally and showcase what we’re doing on a national scale. With the membership steering committee, I have had the opportunity to engage and connect member committees to help facilitate events that focus on inclusivity and equity for designers, architects and architects of color. I want to continue to advocate and elevate these issues as a member of the AIA Board to support and help AIA Seattle work towards leading the way in conversations of engagement towards a more equitable future.

Amarpreet Sethi – Affiliate Director

Amarpreet Sethi headshotAmarpreet Sethi is a Principal and Energy and Sustainability leader at west coast engineering firm, tk1sc. Her work experience in Architecture, Building Science and Engineering allow her to provide valuable contributions in the field of high performance building design holistically. Her knowledge of climate-responsive design, daylighting, HVAC systems enable her to assist in sustainability, especially in the early stages of design. Amarpreet has worked in multiple market sectors to assist in meeting goals of decarbonization and Net Zero. Driven by a passion to provide valuable contributions to clients’ sustainability goals through Building Optimization, Amarpreet has been doing building performance analytics for over 18 years. Amarpreet’s focus on sustainable design first began while completing her Architecture degree in 2001. She went on to achieve a Master of Science in 2003 and worked as part of Mechanical Engineering teams for 15 years prior to joining tk1sc in 2019.

Statement of Interest: I am thrilled to be requested to be part of the board of directors at AIA Seattle. I’ve presented at multiple educational series at AIA focusing on sustainability and building performance through the years and have found the experience very rewarding. I believe I bring a unique background to the board which will help in the conversation around the 2030 challenge, Energy and sustainability as well as health and wellness and systems. I am excited to have a voice through AIA and hence be able to have an impact to move our AEC industry towards a holistic future of energy efficiency through health and wellness and innovative design. I feel strongly that energy and health and wellness need to be discussed as a whole and not exclusively to drive towards passive solutions and this requires an architecture and engineering design partnership. A large portion of this also entails educating our userbase and owners to ask for what adds value beyond the business as usual and change the status quo.

Katie Oman – Affiliate Director
Member since: 2020

Katie Oman headshotKatie is an expert in capital project planning for arts & culture with twenty years’ experience in planning, decision making, and economic analysis for nonprofit and public sector clients across the country. Her approach combines deep technical expertise in the complexities of cultural projects with a sensitivity to the unique needs, values, and aspirations of cultural organizations and their communities. Katie spent a decade as a theatre planning consultant prior to shifting her focus to cultural economics and its intersection with design, working to help clients and design teams make informed decisions about investment in cultural infrastructure. Past projects and clients include Seattle Rep, Minnesota Historical Society, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, American Repertory Theatre, the City of Vancouver, and many others. Katie holds a B.A. in Architecture from Princeton University and an M. Phil. in Public History and Cultural Heritage from Trinity College Dublin.

Statement of Interest: Coming from a design background, but now working in a design-adjacent field, I am a big believer in the power of architecture (and architects!) to influence how communities and cultures develop and thrive. As the US continues to reckon with the legacy of its past and continuing structures of racial injustice and economic inequality, I believe architects are well-positioned to be at the forefront of re-imagining the *symbolism* of cultural buildings in our communities – not to mention their function. Creative approaches to urbanism, placemaking, and design will be at the forefront of our social, economic, and cultural recovery – I’m excited to become a part of this community and help continue these conversations.

Michael Stevens AIA – Director
Member since: 2008

Michael Stevens_headshotMichael is a principal at Everett-based Dykeman Architects. Born and raised in rural West Virginia, Michael relocated to the Northwest in 1999. He has over 20 years of experience in architecture and planning. He has been involved in a variety of projects including public, retail/mixed-use, education, residential, and civic projects. He is a thoughtful leader, an accomplished listener, and an excellent facilitator and client advocate. Michael earned a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania, with a planning focus, augmenting a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Kentucky. Additionally, Michael has served on the City of Marysville City Council since 2010, providing a unique perspective on the impacts of public policy on the built environment. Michael believes the best architecture is the product of a successful collaboration between the design team and the client. He has a broad knowledge of the profession and utilizes his many experiences to develop cohesive designs for his clients.

Statement of Interest: I began my career as an architect in Seattle. I look forward to fostering opportunities to promote a mutually influential relationship between Seattle and the north Puget Sound region architectural communities. I believe AIA Seattle has a relevant voice in public policy issues as they impact the built environment; continuing to exercise that voice in a proactive and consistent manner is paramount to our profession.

Posted in For the Profession, Home Page

Advocacy Update – June 2020

Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone Black Lives Matter Mural

BLACK LIVES MATTER

AIA Seattle joins powerful community voices raised to condemn the murder of George Floyd and the broader system of racism, violence, injustice, and inequity that it represents. In the coming weeks, you will hear more about our broader actions to incorporate anti-racism into our design work, our intercultural understanding, our community leadership, and our workplace practices. On the advocacy front, AIA Seattle’s Public Policy Board has been discussing its work with heightened awareness of the need to make AIA’s policies and policy actions explicitly anti-racist. Initial discussions have centered around incorporating more member voices; inviting those doing the work at the intersection of urbanism and social justice to help us learn; and acting on our understanding that issues around community planning, Design Review, public spaces, transit, housing, sustainability and more must address, support, and offer wellness and safety to everyone in our communities. We welcome all members to join us in this process and invite your comments, questions, and ideas.

Read AIA Seattle’s Statement on Racial Justice and AIA National’s statement here. AIA Seattle’s Racial Justice Resources page can be found here.


STATE NEWS

2018 State Code Delay (Again)
The State Building Code Council (SBCC) considered a further delay to the 2018 state code update at its June 12 meeting. The update, originally scheduled to take effect on July 1, was previously delayed by an executive order from Gov. Inslee to Nov. 1, 2020. Builders and developers, concerned about the economic impacts of COVID, have argued that the implementation date should be delayed further, to Sept. 2021. Gov. Inslee denied a similar request from some state legislators in May, but the SBCC has the authority to enact a delay on its own. At its recent meeting, SBCC members voted against further delay, but because of an issue with the way the vote was conducted (one council member was not heard when he cast his vote), a revote will be conducted. A new vote is not yet scheduled, but, when it happens, there are expected to be enough votes to pass a further delay in the implementation of the new state codes to February 2021. AIA Washington Council sent a letter to SBCC members arguing against further delay. If the state code implementation date is delayed, Seattle will most likely also delay.


COVID-19 UPDATE

Construction Inspections
On Friday, June 5, King County received approval from the State Department of Health to move into a Phase 2 Restart for all private construction activities that are low-risk and adhere to strict COVID Job site Requirements. The City of Seattle also issued requirements for construction projects seeking inspections, available here.

Essentials for Reopening Architect Offices: June 19 Webinar
AIA Washington Council is hosting a webinar on the Essentials for Reopening Architecture Offices on Friday, June 19. The panel discussion will review the policies you will need to have in place, liability issues to address, and planning for keeping your staff, your clients, and you safe and healthy.

COVID Resources
View AIA Seattle’s full list of COVID resources and opportunities here. State and other resources related to reopening the workplace are here.


OPPORTUNITIES

ADU Showcase
AIA’s ADU Showcase, the online version of our canceled ADU Tour, is now open for applications. Projects must be built, designed by an AIA member, and located in one of AIA Seattle’s operating counties. Firms/sole practitioners are limited to one entry each. More info is available here.


EVENTS

AIA Seattle Committee Meetings
The Center for Architecture and Design remains closed, but many meetings have been moved to an online format.  Check AIA’s events page for more details on specific events.

  • AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force continues to meet monthly on the second Thursday at noon via Zoom. For info on how to access the meeting, contact Kirsten.
  • AIA Seattle’s Transportation Task Force is meeting on an ad hoc basis via Zoom. To be added to the Task Force’s email list, contact Kirsten.

Architects in Action – July 9
Formerly known as the annual State Government Network Meeting, Architects is Action is AIA’s premier policy and advocacy event. It offers an opportunity to discuss pressing legislative issues, explore advocacy techniques and tools, and learn directly from your peers from across the country. This year’s event will be entirely virtual and is open to all members. More info here.

 

We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Kirsten Smith
Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | kirstens@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Racial Justice Resources Page

This compilation will continue to get updated and we invite you to contribute to our collective dialogue, learning, and action.

Please contact Zoe Guckenheimer, AIA Seattle’s Program & Event Coordinator, if you would like to add to this list.

Direct Action:

Black lives matter. Consider taking action by donating, protesting, petitioning, calling and emailing representatives, providing mutual aid support, providing shelter, offering your skills, and/or getting involved with organizations. As information and needs are changing rapidly, consider doing research to inform your action.

Organizations Empowering Black Communities
Asian Violence Resources 

Architecture & Design / Race:

Member & Firm-Specific Resources
Get Engaged
Design Organizations Empowering Black Communities
Readings

Anti-Racist Education:

Personal Resources:

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Diversity By Design Exhibition at King Street Station

Diversity Roundtable invites Architects and Architecture firms to celebrate the work of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) designers, designers of all genders, LGBTQI+ designers, designers with disabilities, immigrant designers, and more. Projects will be digitally exhibited at ARTS at King Street Station.

A stipend will be provided to firms with 15 or fewer employees for the time spent creating their submissions. Funds will be equally distributed among the participating firms, and the amount will depend on the number of participants.

For details on submission or questions contact Richard Murray at diversitybydesignseattle@gmail.com

Important Dates

July 10, 2020 Participant Confirmation Deadline

August 7, 2020 Digital files due to Richard Murray with Diversity Roundtable

Mid-September 2020 Exhibition opens at ARTS at King Street Station*
*pending local, state and federal guidelines related to COVID-19

Click here for a downloadable poster to share in your office.

Posted in Committees, Diversity Roundtable, Seattle International Architects Forum, Women in Design

AIA Seattle Statement on Racial Injustice

AIA Seattle Racial Injustice Statement

Dear AIA Seattle Members and Community At-Large,

AIA Seattle joins powerful community voices raised to condemn the murder of George Floyd and the broader system of racism, violence, injustice and inequity that it represents. We see the sustained anguish of Black people in our profession and in our broader community. Black lives matter. We know there is hard work to be done.

Social justice is inextricably linked to the built environment. It is evident in the racist history of redlining in Seattle and other practices that were put in place to undermine communities of color, and it remains evident today in the displacement experienced by communities of color. Leaders of National Organization of Minority Architects Northwest, Leon Holloway and Veronica Barrow, assert in their eloquent statement released today:

Architects are civic stewards who aim to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public through the built environment. As members of NOMA NW and of the AEC community, we believe it is our duty to design and build equitable spaces for all, without prejudice or bias, and to minimize the effects of racism within our profession. We must leverage our positions of privilege to help our most vulnerable citizens, neighbors, and colleagues – who too strive for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

As we experience daily images of pain and conflict, it is easy to feel powerless. But architects are not powerless. The work architects do matters, because it centers the experiences and needs of people. Cornel West says that justice is what love looks like in public. Architect Bryan C. Lee Jr. adds that design justice is what love looks like in public spaces.

Architects choose this profession out of a passion to make our communities better. Never has that urge been more important. We can and must act to make a difference — through our commitment to anti-racism, our design work, our intercultural understanding, our community leadership, and our workplace practices. We must begin by listening to the diverse communities we serve.

We accept the hard work ahead, and take it on with humility. Please help us. Add to our learning and our dialogue with your thoughts and ideas. Speak up where you believe we should be better. Let us join together in this somber moment, as designers and as human beings, to use our time and skills and voices in service to a better world.

Sincerely,
Lisa Richmond
Executive Director
AIA Seattle + Design in Public

Meredith Everist
President, AIA Seattle Board of Directors

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