Culture Change in Practice: A Leadership Cohort 2024

Culture Change in Practice Leadership Cohort graphic

This workshop-based curriculum focuses on individual skill-building and implementation related to structural firm-wide and firm-level change. Participants will grow their capacity and responsiveness to lead justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts and engage in sustained action. Sessions will explore power and privilege, conflict transformations, integrating and investing in equity work, and initiatives and impact. 

Join us for the fourth edition of Culture Change in Practice: A Leadership Cohort on August 7, August 21, September 4, and September 18, 12-4pm PT at the Center for Architecture & Design (1010 Western Ave).


TARGET PARTICIPANTS – FIRM LEADERS*

We invite a dedicated cohort of new, emerging, and current firm leaders from the broader AEC industry who are invested in facilitating impact and being a part of the next generation of change.

  • *Firm Leaders: lead firms, lead practice groups, lead teams, are direct supervisors, make key decisions and have influence and power in shaping the culture and staffing of the firm or projects 

Past participation is not a limitation! We invite firms to tap into this work year after year. Space is limited!


FULL SERIES COST 

Includes continuing education (12 LU pending approval) + lunch and light refreshments 

$960  AIA Member/Corporate Allied Partner (CAP)/Allied Member
$960  Government + Partners
$804  Associate Member
$1,260  Non-Member

Early Bird Deadline: Register by Wednesday, July 24 to save 15%.
Final Registration Deadline: Friday, August 2, 5:00pm PT.

Participants must attend all four workshops to receive continuing education credit or a certificate of completion. No partial credit will be awarded. 

Want to learn more about the member ticket rate and other benefits associated with membership? Click here. Want to learn more about our program pricing and the other major education programs we offer? Click here.

Reduced Rate Options

While we are striving to prevent or minimize the labor that BIPOC leaders are often asked to carry out in equity-related conversations, we recognize that our world’s power dynamics may unintentionally arise in this space. With that in mind, we encourage BIPOC and other marginalized participants to submit a reduced rate request. In addition, we recognize this fee may present hardship to some firms or individuals who are nevertheless committed to investing in the work. AIA Seattle has reserved limited funds for reduced rate requests, available on a first come, first serve basis (priority given to AIA members).

Please submit the Scholarship / Reduced Rate Request Form via email by Wednesday, July 24, 5:00pm PT. 


WHY PARTICIPATE?

Invest in Equity Work  

Investing in equity work offers significant returns for both individuals and firms. This program will help you build a firm culture that values justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion to deepen employee engagement and firm- and industry-wide impact.

Engage in Responsive Learning 

Creating culture change within architecture and allied firms is a critical step to creating a more diverse and equitable profession and industry. And through this professional change, we hope to influence broader cultural change, due to the significant role architects play in crafting our physical environment. The Culture Change in Practice program was designed by a team of architects and allied professionals as a response to racist violence, inequitable firm culture, and a segregated built environment. The architectural profession is still predominantly white and predominantly male. Of the AIA Seattle’s over 2,400 members, just 24 are Black or African American, and 4 are Indigenous American, while only 32% are women or nonbinary according to AIA members’ self-reported data.

Join a Growing List of Leaders 

The Culture Change in Practice program has already engaged 75+ leaders! Read Testimonials from Past Cohort Participants to understand the value of their experiences. Will you join them? 


MEET THE FACILITATOR

Dr. Anu Taranath, Dr. Anu Consulting: dialogues for justice | Dr. Anu Taranath is a speaker, author, educator, and racial equity consultant who partners with a range of people to deepen conversations on history, harm and healing. A University of Washington Seattle professor for the past 20+ years, Dr. Anu knows that the most compelling conversations on race, identity, power, and belonging take place when people feel valued and heard. She has received the Seattle Weekly’s “Best of Seattle” recognition, the University’s Distinguished Teaching Award, and multiple US Fulbright Fellowships to work abroad. As a consultant she has partnered with over 300 clients from National Geographic Society to the Raging Grannies. Her book “Beyond Guilt Trips: Mindful Travel in an Unequal World” was named a Washington State Book Award Finalist, Newsweek’s Future of Travel Winner in Storytelling, and included in Oprah Magazine’s “Best 26 Travel Books of All Times.” Visit www.anutaranath.com to learn more.


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

August 7, 12pm-4pm PT | Workshop 1: Power & Privilege | In-Person @ the Center for Architecture and Design (1010 Western Ave)

We will get to know one another in this session, and learn about the equity journeys of the firms represented. What are some of the general barriers to equity work? How might we handle discomfort in productive ways? How does a deeper awareness of our power and positionality in relation to others help us develop a responsibility toward stewardship, especially as leaders in our firm? This first workshop will explore what exactly equity stewardship looks like, especially since some firm leaders’ life experiences might look quite different from those on whose behalf they are advocating.

August 21, 12pm-4pm PT | Workshop 2: Conflict Transformations | In-Person @ the Center for Architecture and Design (1010 Western Ave)

Conflict is often seen as a barrier and obstacle to progress. We will unpack how we approach conflict, reframe these moments as opportunities to grow and better ourselves with practical skills and tools. Importantly, psychological safety is often a precursor to enable us to have tough conversations and navigate conflict with more stability and strategy. This second workshop will help build more connections between equity work, anti-racism, emotional literacy and leadership strategies.

September 4, 12pm-4pm PT | Workshop 3: Integrating & Investing in Equity Work | In-Person @ the Center for Architecture and Design (1010 Western Ave)

This third workshop will explore the integration of equity work into business practice emphasizing its role in enhancing a firm’s overall culture and success. Participants will deepen their understanding of equity work as a valuable investment and develop personalized action plans, enabling them to immediately apply these tools, resources, and strategies within their firms and individual practices. 

September 18, 12pm-4pm PT | Workshop 4: Initiatives & Impact | In-Person @ the Center for Architecture and Design (1010 Western Ave)

This final workshop will provide cohort participants the opportunity to share learning and collaborate on refining their firm’s equity initiatives based on unique challenges and opportunities. Participants will discuss how we measure impact and long-range success, and track hopes and progress together. By the end of the program, participants will leave with a plan to sustain ongoing efforts, advance these initiatives within their firms, and contribute to structural change.

Cohort participants commit to engaging in all four sessions, understanding that the content is designed sequentially for cohort-based learning. All sessions subject to change.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Examine how inequitable firm management and top-down practices are resulting in negative design outcomes that impact the health and well-being of communities.
  • Share best practices around mentorship and paths-to-leadership for BIPOC and other historically marginalized people who are not typically seen in leadership positions in architecture and allied professions.
  • Explore how to navigate one’s own positioning of power and privilege through equity stewardship and responsible practice.
  • Expand leadership capacities by understanding conflict skills, emotional literacy, and psychological safety to transform collaboration with project teams, clients, and community groups.
  • Understand how to integrate equity work as part of business practice to emphasize its role in a firms overall culture, success, and ability to meaningfully engage with the people and communities we’re designing for. 
  • Develop skills and language to weave justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts into project work – to better equip architects to prioritize the diverse social, physical, and emotional needs of occupants.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PLANNING TEAM

Alyssa M. Mitchell Assoc. AIA, Weber Thompson | Jennie C. Li, Planning in Color/UW Landscape Architecture | John Alex Correa, HEWITT  | Leon Holloway, NOMA NW/DLR Group | Shweta Sinha AIA, Schemata Workshop | Susan Frieson AIA, Diversity Roundtable/JE:DI Council/NOMA NW/AIA Membership Advancement Committee | Marijana Misic AIA, NOMA, AIA Seattle Board of Directors/Mahlum | Meredith Everist AIA, Past AIA Seattle Board of Directors/Baylis Architects 

Initiated in 2021, the Culture Change in Practice program was developed by the Racial Justice Working Group (RJWG) in close collaboration with individuals from NOMA NW, Planning in Color, and Diversity Roundtable. Thank you to all who have contributed to this program over the years! 


PAST FIRM PARTICIPANTS

Architects Without Borders – Seattle | Arup | AssuredPartners | B+H Advance Strategy | Bassetti Architects
Berger Partnership | Betts, Patterson & Mines, P.S. | BuildingWork | Coughlin Porter Lundeen | DLR Group
Dykeman | Environmental Works | FSi Engineers | Gensler | GGLO | HEWITT | Integrus Architecture
Jackson Main Architecture | Johnston Architects | KPFF | GGN | Mahlum | McGranahan Architects
MG2 | Mithun | Nakano Associates  | NBBJ | Olson Kundig | Perkins+Will | Rice Fergus Miller, Inc
Runberg Architecture Group | Schemata Workshop | Schreiber Starling Whitehead Architects
SHKS Architects | Signal Architecture + Research | Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects
The Miller Hull Partnership | third place design cooperative | VIA Architecture
Weber Thompson | Weinstein A+U | Weisman Design Group

 + Will you join this list? 


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Senior Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Zoe Guckenheimer, Senior Programs Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Zee Mars, Development Manager at AIA Seattle

Posted in Allied Professionals, Architects, Associates, For the Profession, For the Public, JEDI, Member Firms, Racial Justice Working Group

Board of Directors Nominations 2024

Nominees for the 2024-25 Board of Director's open seats. Vote by July 12.

AIA Seattle’s Board Nominating Committee is pleased to present this slate of accomplished members to fill open seats on our Board of Directors or current board members moving to officer positions or different positions beginning September 1, 2024.

Deadline: July 12, 2024. All AIA and Associate AIA members are eligible to vote. Votes are yes or no for each nominee, and write-in votes are allowed. Voting by at least 10% of the membership is required to validate an election, so please use the vote button below to make sure your voice is heard. 

Vote now!

Click here to vote

Matt Hutchins AIA, CPHD – (President) 2024 – 2025

Matt Hutchins AIA headshot

Matt is a founding Principal of CAST Architecture with a focus on creative infill housing as the nexus of low-carbon living, urban vitality, and social policy. Matt serves as a Director of Public Policy on the AIA Seattle Board of Directors and as the Strategic Councilor for AIA Washington Council. He has co-chaired AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and organized many public programs on urban design, housing, and accessory dwelling units. He was named AIA Seattle’s Volunteer of the Year in 2020. Matt is a Seattle Planning Commissioner and Co-Chair of the Housing and Neighborhoods Committee. In 2017, he co-founded MOAR (More Options for Accessory Residences), a grassroots organization that helped pass Seattle’s landmark ADU reform. Seattle Magazine named Matt one of the 35 Most Influential People in 2019.

Note: Matt is our current President-Elect, rising to the position of President.

Melissa Falcetti AIA  – (President-Elect) 2024 – 2025

Melissa grew up in a logging town of just 250 people in the Cascade Mountains. When she was young, her uncle taught her to use power tools, sparking a lifelong interest in the building industry. She went on to earn two BA degrees from Scripps College and a Master of Architecture degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Melissa is now a licensed Architect in Washington, an AIA member, a Certified Construction Specifier, and has passed the CSI’s CDT exam. She has worked in a variety of roles and companies from a small construction defects/owner’s representative firm to one of the largest design firms in the world.

Note: Melissa is our current Director of Membership.

 

Erik Heironimus AIA – (Director) 2024 – 2025

Erik Heironimus is an experienced Senior Designer and Licensed Architect in the state of Washington with a strong background in urban architecture and mixed-use developments. He has an invested interest in the future of Seattle and a passion for how thoughtful design can positively impact the spaces we craft and the lives of the people that inhabit them. Working on projects regionally and globally, Erik has developed a diverse portfolio and skillset with a recognized ability to deliver innovative projects, regardless of project type or scale.

 

 

Tyler Schaffer AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, ENV SP – (Director) 2024 – 2025

Tyler Schaffer is a principal at LMN Architects. He currently participates within the AIA at several levels. Locally, he is chair of the AIA Seattle Urban Design Forum and is on the Seattle Design Festival Planning Team. He participates in the Comprehensive Plan Workgroup and Transit Oriented Development Workgroup. At the state level, he is on the AIA WA Livability and Affordability Committee and attends the annual Capital Connections event in Olympia. At the national level, Tyler is part of the AIA Construction Contract Administration Knowledge Community Leadership Group. He is eager to further support the members of AIA Seattle!

 

Scott Melbourne PLA, ASLA – (Affiliate Director) 2024 – 2025

Scott Melbourne is dedicated to designing inspired landscapes that bring communities together while strengthening ties between individuals and their environment. During the past two decades he has contributed toward a range of park, university, urban mixed-use, and hospitality projects for public and private clients alike. His award-winning teaching has explored the potential for design to inform decision-making in developing regions of Southeast Asia. After a decade overseas, Scott returned to the Pacific Northwest to co-found MxM Landscape Architecture in 2021. He is the author of Refining Nature: The Landscape Architecture of Peter Walker, published by Birkhäuser.

 

Kirsten Dahlquist AIA, LEED AP – (Director) 2024 – 2025

Kirsten is an Architect and Associate at Rice Fergus Miller. Her work varies among food banks, health and wellness facilities, and community gathering centers, many of which are for tribal nations. Throughout her 16 year career Kirsten’s work has focused on imagining solutions for the systemic social challenges of the 21st century through community engaged design, collaboration and place-keeping. Locally, Kirsten serves as chair of the Bremerton Design Review Board and is a Kitsap County Council for Human Rights councilmember. She holds a B. Arch from Florida A&M University and a M. Arch from the University of South Florida.

 

Shweta Sinha AIA – (Director) 2024 – 2025

An architect, who first came to the US for graduate studies, Shweta brings influences from Indian culture, spaces, and architecture. She has worked In Los Angeles and Princeton on a wide range of projects from museums to community schools and was founding principal of an architecture firm in Bangalore, India. Her most recent experience in the PNW, is in housing projects that provide affordable, innovative living in urban neighborhoods. Shweta is an active member of the AIA Racial Justice Working Group, where she works towards creating a more equitable architectural practice and ultimately, a rich and diverse built environment.

Posted in For the Profession

AIA YAF + WID 2024 Happy Hour Series: Measure What Matters Hosts Line Up

AIA YAF + WID 2024 Happy Hour Series: Measure What Matters Happy Hour – check out the list of hosts!

  • May – MG2
  • June – TBD
  • July – NAC Architecture
  • August – ZGF
  • Sept – Integrus
  • Oct – Fora Landscape Architects
  • Nov – Mithun

 

Posted in Uncategorized, Women in Design, Young Architects Forum

Request for Proposals – Accessibility Evaluation Tool & Staff Training

In alignment with our JE:DI Imperative, AIA Seattle recognizes the need for a comprehensive Accessibility Evaluation Tool. This tool will aim to help AIA Seattle staff develop and deliver accessible and inclusive programs, encompassing both in-person and virtual events. Additionally, staff training is essential to ensure the effective implementation of the accessibility tool and related strategies as foundational to AIA Seattle’s work.

Review the full request for proposal document here

Proposals Due June 17. For inquiries or clarifications regarding this RFP, please contact Senior Programs Manager, Zoë Guckenheimer.

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, JEDI, Missions, Visions, Values

Advocacy Update – May 2024

Photo: AIA Seattle Staff and Board Members at the 2023 Housing Forum. 

City of Seattle Comp Plan Engagement Period Extended

The City of Seattle has extended the public engagement period for the Draft One Seattle Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement to May 20th. Get engaged and drop your comments, give a thumbs up or down to others’ comments, and advocate for a livable City in the engagement hub.

AIA Seattle shared recommendations for a livable City in a letter to Mayor Harrell, Councilmembers, and City Staff. Members are encouraged to use AIA Seattle’s recommendations to get active in the engagement hub!

AIA Seattle also signed on to the Complete Communities Coalition Letter to advocate for a bolder Comprehensive Plan. The Complete Communities Coalition is dedicated to fostering an affordable, equitable, and sustainable Seattle.

Do you have a Multi- Family Housing Project to Share?

The City of Seattle Mayor’s Staff is looking to our members to learn more about your work on market rate and affordable multi-family housing projects. They would like to hear from you to better understand the project process from start to finish. If you have a project you’d like to share, contact City of Seattle staff directly: karin.eastby@seattle.gov and caia.caldwell@seattle.gov

Learning and Connection Opportunity: AIA Seattle’s Housing Forum

Housing: A Stage for Life seeks to respond to the evolving housing landscape and explore how housing can center specific community needs and support people through various life stages. This year’s program will spotlight policy interventions, innovative project case studies, community perspectives, and inspiring designs that foreground users while addressing actionable solutions to develop more plentiful, quality, diverse, and sustainable housing options in Seattle and beyond.

Join us for Housing: A Stage for Life on Monday, June 17, 2024, at 415 Westlake in Seattle (8 LU/HSW).


We’d love to hear from you! For more information on advocacy topics, please contact:

Melissa K. Neher | Executive Director, AIA Seattle

Posted in Advocacy

COHO | Nickelsville Kitchen Design Project

Image: Rendering of the structures COHO has designed and will build for the Nickelsville Northlake village.

Imagine having an apartment or a home without a kitchen.  For some, kitchens sound like a basic need, but for many they are a luxury.  Many of our unhoused neighbors live without a kitchen, and even those in transitional housing, such as tiny house villages, do not have access to a comfortable cooking space.  AIA Seattle’s Committee on Homelessness (COHO) is partnering with Nickelsville, Seattle’s only self-managed tiny house village, to design, fund, and build a kitchenette and gathering shelter.  Nickelsville is asking for your donations in order to make this important addition to their village a reality!  How often do you get the chance to expand access to one of life’s simple joys and necessities? Donate below and make a difference.

donate button

Image: Floor plan of the structures COHO has designed and will build for the Nickelsville Northlake village.

While tiny house villages are great homes for those who would otherwise be unhoused, the tiny house villages only provide the bare essentials for a home: sleeping accommodations; bathroom and shower facilities; and sometimes makeshift areas for preparing and eating food. The Nickelsville Northlake village’s current food preparation area is an open metal canopy with tarps as a roof. There are no walls, no doors, and no waterproofing. The residents have lived with this situation for many years and are in dire need of an upgrade.  In fact, it was heavily damaged in November 2023 during a windstorm. COHO hopes that this project proves everyone deserves a warm, safe, and inviting kitchen and gathering structure, allowing residents the opportunity to maintain and develop some of life’s most important skills: cooking and creating community.

Image: The current kitchen condition at the Nickelsville Northlake village.

   

Images: The damage done by the November 2023 windstorm. Nickelsville has since patched the hole up, but the matter remains that this structure is not stable for long term use.

This project has the opportunity to become a prototype for a vital addition to tiny house villages in our region.  The design is modular and can be moved with the other components of the tiny house village.  By providing a structure specifically designed for food preparation and gathering, this project gives tiny house village residents the opportunity to cook and socialize in a manner similar to those in traditional homes.  Also, cooking in an established structure as opposed to a makeshift one greatly reduces the risk of fires, which can, of course, happen while cooking.  

BACKGROUND

The AIA Seattle Committee on Homelessness (COHO) mobilizes architects to help our unsheltered neighbors through the areas of advocacy, education, and service. We are architects, professionals, and concerned citizens who believe that the Seattle region’s homelessness crisis demands immediate action. We aim to use our knowledge of design, construction, and the urban environment to help those who are unsheltered or lack housing security.

Nickelsville is a self-managed organization with two tiny house villages in Seattle. The residents, whom call themselves Nickelodeons, decide together who lives in the village, attend weekly meetings to discuss events, updates for the villages, or issues within the organization, and advocate for policies to address homelessness in the region. They are very active within the community and cared for by their neighbors. You can find out more about their organization at https://www.nickelsville.org/

Nickelsville approached COHO in early 2023 with the idea of collaborating together to replace their existing kitchen structure.  COHO has taken on the challenge, and in the second half of 2023 met twice a month to develop a design, prepare questions, ideas and images for the Nickelsville community, and to incorporate their feedback.

The following are quotes from residents of Nickelsville Northlake:

  • “Nickelodeons find it difficult to cook during inclement weather, especially during Seattle’s rainy windy days. We also use our kitchen as a meeting space. As you can imagine, this becomes much harder during summer’s hot days. People often find themselves unable to pay attention and remember topics discussed during frigid, windy and wet days of winter.”
    – Debra (House #9)
  • “We use a microwave and toaster to cook in a cold and leaky tent for a kitchen. Not enough appliances. We need a warm and usable kitchen.”
    – Charlie (House #16)
  • I look forward to the benefits of a full-size oven and cooking indoors out of the weather. This will improve health through better nutrition and peace of mind. Thank you for helping us improve our living conditions.”
    – Mark (House #19)

Image: A presentation meeting with COHO and Nickelsville to choose the final design for the structure configuration.

COHO is partnering with JAS Design Build, Sound Foundations, and is receiving in-kind donations from dassoXTR and Greenhome Solutions. If you would like to contribute to us with in kind donations, please reach out through COHO@aiaseattle.org. Please show that you believe everyone deserves a place to cook and establish community by donating to this project

Posted in Committee on Homelessness, Committees, For the Public

Advocacy Update – April 2024

Group of people discussing the Draft Comprehensive Plan together in a circle

Seattle News

AIA Seattle Members – Get Active for a Livable City

AIA Seattle members envisions the City of Seattle as a livable city with a variety of housing near many types of amenities, retail cores, and transit that appeals to and is accessible to everyone, where everything residents need can be reached within 15 minutes by walking, rolling, or public transit.

AIA Seattle members have a valued voice in our city’s future, and they can get active now to impact the evolution of both the One Seattle Draft Comprehensive Plan and the Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Members have expressed great disappointment in the lack of vision and limited pathways for growth in the current draft versions of these plans. It’s time to make sure we come together to move the needle in the direction of the 15-minute city!

Here’s How to Advocate for a Livable City of Seattle

Your voice matters, and whether you have just a few minutes, or a few hours, you can take action to express to elected officials and municipal staff the urgent need for a livable city. Share information to help your colleagues get active! You can use AIA Seattle’s Talking Points as a tool to support your engagement.

Attend an upcoming Open House in the next few days
Join an Open House event for the City of Seattle’s Draft Comprehensive Plan to advocate for livable communities. Join a pre-open house coffee organized by our fellow advocates with Complete Communities Coalition to meet like-minded folks and attend the Open House together!

Share written comments in OPCD’s Engagement Hub before May 6th
The format for OPCD collecting comments through the hub is not straightforward. Stay with it! You can place comments in specific areas of the plan, and read and comment on the comments other folks make. You will first be required to share some information about yourself and then can engage most easily by choosing ‘elements’ from the plan.

Reach out to your City Council Representative or the Mayor’s Office.
You can find City Council email addresses and send a message to the Mayor or his team.

Repost calls to action to encourage your colleagues to get active!
Share posts from AIA Seattle’s LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook

AIA Seattle Draft Comp Plan and Draft EIS Positions Developed from Member Input

Thanks to the dozens of AIA Seattle members who engaged in the April 2nd Charrette for the One Seattle Draft Comprehensive Plan offered by the Urban Design Forum and AIA Seattle Comprehensive Plan Workgroup. The charrette was an engaging opportunity to identify areas of alignment and recommendations for improvement in the draft plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

Supreme Court Heard Case Monday with Implications for People Experiencing Homelessness

On Monday, the Supreme Court heard arguments that will determine how people experiencing homelessness are treated under local laws. The case, City of Grants Pass, Oregon v. Johnson, will significantly impact whether cities can criminalize people sleeping outside and what actions cities can take under the Eighth Amendment, which protects individuals from status-based crimes.

The AIA Seattle Committee on Homelessness shared concerns about this case in a February letter to the City of Seattle’s City Attorney, Mayor, and City Council and urged the city to focus on solutions to our community’s urgent housing crisis rather than disregard the rights of people experiencing homelessness. AIA Seattle believes the City should adopt a comprehensive plan that reevaluates Seattle’s growth strategy to end exclusionary zoning and add housing capacity everywhere; speeds up housing production by addressing process bottlenecks and supporting more housing types; and addresses city design challenges by lessening code requirements which prohibit development.

The Supreme Court’s decision will most likely be delivered in June.


We’d love to hear from you! For more information on advocacy topics, please contact:

Melissa K. Neher | Executive Director, AIA Seattle

Posted in Advocacy

2024 Young Architects Award | Amanda Snelson AIA

Congratulations to AIA Seattle member Amanda Snelson AIA, for being a recipient of the AIA National 2024 Young Architects Award!

With the heart of a mother and the spirit of an activist, Amanda Snelson AIA, treats architecture as an adaptable tool to serve communities and shape a more sustainable and equitable world. Never shy about sharing the challenges she has faced on her journey to motherhood and balancing her career while parenting two young children, she leads with empathy as she encourages other women in the profession – including in her role as Co-Chair for AIA Seattle’s Women in Design Committee.

Snelson’s path to architecture began with a love of art and a knack for geometry. Growing up in the Ozarks, she dreamed of making big things one day, just like her ironworker father. Now, across 13 years of practice, she has left her mark on a wide array of projects, from small renovations to multi-million dollar life science projects. She began her career as a daylight analyst and modeler and has already risen to associate principal at ZGF Architects. In each of her roles, she has displayed a true passion for the profession and a deep understanding of the ways design affects communities.

Pursuing meaningful citizenship has long been an imperative for Snelson. Her first involvement with AIA was in Springfield, Missouri, where she volunteered on AIA Springfield’s events committee. Later, while at Dake Wells Architecture, she helped organize the firm’s participation in community events, curating window displays for downtown art walks and encouraging her colleagues to participate in bike-to-work weeks. She also founded and organized seven local PechaKucha Nights, which were affiliated with the globally acclaimed events series, and collaborated with 55 local artists and community members. Because of her community engagement efforts in Springfield, 417 Magazine placed Snelson on its 20 under 30 list in 2012.

Her engagement continued when she moved to Los Angeles, where she served on AIA Los Angeles’ Design Awards Committee. As she sat for her licensure exams, she became involved with NCARB, and in 2016, seeking to make the path easier for other aspiring architects, she spoke about licensure at the AIA Conference on Architecture.

Throughout her career, Snelson has been a staunch advocate for sustainability and has been involved in her firm’s AIA 2030 Commitments and firmwide reporting. She has worked with ZGF’s project performance team as the Los Angeles liaison, gathering data for more than 30 existing projects and ensuring all new projects were reported. Due to her tireless efforts in the realm of sustainability, she received the DuPont Emerging Leaders Scholarship from the Design Futures Council.

As she continues to add to her professional toolkit, Snelson proves that it’s possible to be a mother and a successful leader in the studio. She contributes to the culture and well-being at ZGF’s Seattle office, where she is currently working on tenant improvement projects for Seattle Children’s Hospital.


The American Institute of Architects selected 30 recipients for the 2024 Young Architects Award, which honors individuals who have demonstrated exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the architecture profession early in their careers.

Read about the other AIA National Young Architect Award Recipients.

Posted in Fellows and Honors

Advocacy Update – March 2024

Seattle News

Draft Comprehensive Plan Released

After months of anticipation, the draft One Seattle Comprehensive Plan has finally arrived! This Comprehensive Plan update for Seattle marks a critical milestone in shaping the city’s future growth over the next 20 years, addressing key questions around equitable opportunity, neighborhood design, and sustainability. According to the Mayor’s office and the Office of Planning and Community Development (OPCD), the One Seattle Comprehensive Plan comprises Four Key Moves:

  • Housing and Affordability: Expand housing opportunities across the city
  • Equity and Opportunity: Promote a more equitable Seattle as we grow
  • Community and Neighborhoods: Focus growth and investment in walkable communities
  • Climate and Sustainability: Meet  challenges of climate change for a resilient future

The release date of March 5th marked the beginning of a two-month (60-day) public engagement period. AIA Seattle’s Comp Plan Work Group has been diligently preparing for the Plan’s release by creating a detailed framework for their work and response during the public comment period. The group looks forward to engaging with the membership over the next two months to inform their response.

Urban Design Forum to Host Charrette to Guide City’s Growth

As part of this crucial endeavor, Urban Design Forum will host a charrette to support the Comp Plan Work Group in activating member engagement. This exciting opportunity will allow participants to imagine the possibilities and inform how the group should respond during the public comment period.

  • When: April 2nd, 4:00-6:15 PM
  • Where: Center for Architecture and Design, 1010 Western Ave
  • More information will follow

State News

2024 Legislative Session Wraps: AIA Washington Celebrates Wins on Licensure, Sustainability, Housing Affordability

The 2024 Washington State legislative session has been a huge success for AIAWA and its advocacy priorities. Despite being a short 60-day sprint, this fast-paced session saw the passage of several bills that AIAWA championed tirelessly. We extend our sincere gratitude to everyone who contributed their time, expertise, and unwavering support to AIAWA’s legislative agenda this year.

A critical achievement is the passage of HB 1880, which eliminates the rolling clock in state statute for licensure. After significant efforts by AIAWA, this bill secured unanimous support from both legislative chambers and now awaits Governor Inslee’s signature. The passage of this bill this session will break down barriers, provide flexibility, and ensure a more inclusive path to licensure. The removal of the rolling clock will take effect July 1, 2024.

Another milestone is the passage of HB 1282, the Buy Clean and Buy Fair legislation, promoting sustainable and ethical construction practices. This bill mandates transparency and accountability for building materials used in major state-funded projects by requiring firms to report Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs), Health Product Declarations, working conditions, and other data. It also directs the Department of Commerce to develop a public database for this information and establishes the “Buy Clean Buy Fair” workgroup.

Additionally, AIAWA secured an important budget proviso in the Operating Budget, allocating $250,000 to the State Building Code Council to study embodied carbon language in other jurisdictions’ building codes and provide recommendations for potential adoption by December 1, 2024.

While the Navigator (HB 1391) did not advance, AIAWA’s partners at Shift Zero secured $3.5 million in the Operating Budget to facilitate access to energy assistance programs, including incentives, audits, and rebates for retrofitting homes and small businesses. However, this funding is contingent on the Climate Commitment Act not being repealed by Initiative Measure No. 2117.

This session, we saw multiple bills seeking to address the acute need for more affordable housing options, and the passage of HB 2071 advances that goal. It directs the State Building Code Council to convene technical advisory groups and make recommendations to apply the International Residential Code (IRC) to multiplex housing of up to six units. Additionally, it calls for revisions to the International Building Code (IBC) to allow unit sizes smaller than current efficiency dwelling unit requirements. The bill also requires the development of an illustrative standard plan set that meets or exceeds all energy code regulations for residential housing subject to the IRC. This optional plan set can be used by local governments and builders as a prescriptive pathway for energy code compliance.

Furthermore, the passage of HB 1998 aims to increase affordable co-living housing choices by requiring cities and counties to allow this type of development, featuring individually rented sleeping units with shared kitchen facilities within urban areas zoned for multifamily or mixed-use. Cities and counties cannot impose overly restrictive regulations related to unit sizes, parking requirements near transit, density calculations, and other development standards.

The 2024 legislative session has truly been one for the books – a huge success that AIAWA and all of you advocating alongside us should take immense pride in. It was because of each of you that we achieved wins on so many fronts crucial to our profession and communities.


We’d love to hear from you! For more information on advocacy topics, please contact:

Samantha Morrow | Senior Manager of Policy & Advocacy, AIA Washington Council & AIA Seattle

Posted in Advocacy

AIA Seattle Announces the 2024 Fellows

Pictured (left to right): Ann Marie Borys FAIA, Douglas Ito FAIA, J. Todd Scott FAIA, Jim Hanford FAIA, John Shoesmith FAIA, Kathrina Simonen FAIA, and Robert Misel FAIA.

The fellowship program was developed to elevate those architects who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession and made a significant contribution to architecture and society on a national level. Architects who have been elevated to fellowship can be identified by the designation FAIA after name.

We are extremely fortunate to have each of these AIA Seattle Members as leaders in our talented and dedicated design community!


Ann Marie Borys, FAIA University of Washington Department of Architecture | Through teaching, scholarship, academic administration, and service, Ann Marie orients students towards ethical practice by integrating history, theory, design, and professional values within a pedagogy of social engagement, action research, and critical inquiry.

Douglas Ito, FAIA – SMR Architects | Douglas is the 2024 winner of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award. For over 26 years, Ito has been instrumental in projects that make real his belief that all people deserve good design, and housing that confronts the racial, social, and political injustices that continue to pervade society.

J. Todd Scott, FAIA – King County Historic Preservation Office | By leveraging historic resources and community engagement for revitalization, leading preservation organizations, and educating others, Todd has empowered diverse communities to revitalize their architectural and cultural heritage for the benefit of future generations.

Jim Hanford, FAIA – The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP | Leading the sustainable design process for the country’s most influential projects, Jim actualizes Miller Hull’s ethos, standardizing high-performance within its practice, and awakening the architectural community to a new standard of building.

John Shoesmith, FAIAPerkins Eastman | John elevates the standard in design for aging and memory care environments. His award-winning design, knowledge sharing, advocacy, and influence in regulatory change improves lives and inspires others in the profession.

Kathrina Simonen, FAIAUniversity of Washington / Carbon Leadership Forum | Carbon activist Kate has crystallized the embodied carbon movement with cutting-edge research, incubation of new approaches and cross-sector collaboration, equipping architects with the data, policies and social infrastructure to successfully harness carbon-smart material solutions.

Robert Misel, FAIA – The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP | Rob’s approach to firm and project leadership creates an environment of inclusivity, transparency and accountability. His commitment prioritizes equity with sustainable design excellence, fostering necessary diversity and engagement within projects, communities, and the profession.

Posted in Committees, Fellows and Honors

Updates from the Justice & Equity for Diversity & Inclusion Council

AIA Seattle JEDI Council

Who serves on the AIA Seattle JE:DI Council?

Michele Hill AIA (co-chair) | AIA Seattle President
Matthew Hagen AIA (co-chair) | Workshop 315
Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA (emeritus chair) | GGLO
Anna Leach AIA | Amazon
Rania Qawasma | Koz Development, Daarna
Rio Namiki AIA | Miller Hull Partnership
Sarah Burk AIA | Johnston Architects
Susan Frieson AIA | Weber Thompson

Priorities and Accomplishments from 2023

Diversity in Leadership Fund
JE:DI Council supported the rollout of the Diversity in Leadership Fund, which provides funding to alleviate the potential barrier of the membership cost, which is required for prospective committee chairs. Proposed co-chairs whose employers do not cover their AIA dues and who are from historically marginalized backgrounds (due to disability, gender identity, class, race/ethnicity, immigration status, sexual orientation, or other factor) have the option to request the chapter cover dues as a new or reinstating membership for the duration of the chair’s service to the committee (generally two years).

JE:DI IRL
AIA Seattle wrapped up our JE:DI IRL (In Real Life) series this last year. The series was started by the Justice and Equity for Diversity and Inclusion Committee and AIA Northern Virginia (NOVA) Women in Design. The series covered topics ranging from barriers to licensure, leadership, and diversity within the experiences of all attendees.

This free series is being expanded this year to include many chapters across the United States which will bring more backgrounds and keep the conversation progressing. Keep an eye out for more details in the coming months!

Advocacy for Accessibility at the National Conference 
All events should be accessible, particularly events delivered by our organization. Last year many members expressed concerns about the lack of virtual access at the AIA Conference on Architecture. In response, JE:DI Council penciled a letter to the conference planning committee advocating for remote access. The Council also emphasized the need for increased transparency,  communicating considerations and decisions made regarding virtual delivery to members at the time of registration.

We are continuing to monitor the status and hope to see results with the tickets for the event going on sale this week, on February 28.

New Justice and Equity for Diversity and Inclusion Board of Directors Seat
The Board of Directors has approved a petition to bring a new seat who will represent our Justice and Equity for Diversity and Inclusion goals. We are excited that AIA Seattle has agreed to bring in more voices to the conversation and look forward to the future representative being on the Board of Directors next year.

Vetting AIA Seattle Leadership + Local Award Winners
After meeting with a representative from National, the JE:DI Council has put forward a recommendation that a National Ethics violation review be officially adopted as part of our review process for AIA leadership and local individual award nominees. The hope is that this a demonstration that our members are committed to following the highest standards of professionalism, integrity, competence, and ethical practice. The Member Advancement Committee has approved this recommendation, and JE:DI Council will be facilitating the process for our current board nominations.

Posted in JEDI, Racial Justice Working Group

Seattle COTE Blog

The COTE blog is a new resource we are offering. Here we will share news, ideas, and resources from the field. Our first blog post is an overview of actions the average homeowner and renter can take to live more sustainably, as well as a list of incentives, rebates, and resources to help make these switches easier.

Residential Resources

You don’t need to build a new, net zero home in order to be sustainable. In fact, “the greenest building is the one that already exists”. There are many things you can do to reduce the carbon footprint of your existing home and save money. The solutions that follow range from small (easy/free or low cost) to large (labor intensive/higher cost).

If you are a renter, you can still do many of the things listed below. You can also talk to your landlord to see if they would be interested in making any of these upgrades. After all, making these improvements would save them money and would serve as good marketing material for their building.

Small:

When thinking about sustainability in buildings, people often immediately think of high-tech solutions such as adding solar panels to your roof. While this is a solution you’ll see listed below, it isn’t the first place to start. Before you add anything, consider reducing, reusing, and recycling. Once you have reduced your carbon footprint, you’ll have much less to offset when it comes to the more costly solutions, such as those snazzy solar panels.

Reduce
  • Unplug electronics when you’re not using them
  • Turn off lights when you aren’t using them
  • Turn off the faucet when brushing your teeth
  • Separate your waste – recycle, compost, garbage
  • Switch your light bulbs to LED
  • Program your thermostat to adjust the temperature when you are not home or sleeping
  • Seal air leaks around windows and doors with weatherstripping or caulking
  • During hot weather, open the windows at night and close them during the day (night flushing)
  • Hang dry your clothes instead of using the dryer
  • Use tap temperature water when washing your clothes instead of hot when possible
  • Fix leaks, dripping faucets, and running toilets
  • Buy your electricity from a utility that uses all-renewable sources (eg, SCL allows you to buy in to support all-renewable service)
Reuse
  • Buy used appliances/fixtures/household goods from resale shops, thrift stores, or directly from sellers via Craigslist, NextDoor, Facebook Marketplace
  • Borrow tools from your local Tool Libraries
  • Purchase food from your local farmer’s market, CSA, or consider signing up for a food service that rescues food
  • Take advantage of online Buy Nothing groups
  • Reach out to recycling groups when doing any demolition work on your property – most materials, including broken concrete and planting soil, can be reused in some fashion and you might also save on hauling/dump fees
Recycle
  • Sign up for an additional recycling service that helps recycle what your municipality cannot. Side note: we use Ridwell and have easily cut our garbage volume by a third! Which saves at least as much as the Ridwell costs in SPU fees…

Medium:

These options can be a little more costly but can have a big impact.

  • Install energy-efficient appliances (look for the Energy Star label)
  • Swap out your plumbing fixtures for low-flow (consider: shower heads ≤1.5 gpm, bathroom faucets ≤0.5 gpm, kitchen faucets ≤1.5 gpm, single flush toilets ≤1.28 gpf, dual flush toilets ≤1.6 gpf. Look for the WaterSense label)
  • Add shades or blinds to your windows to reduce heat gain
  • Plant deciduous bushes or trees outside your home to block light/heat during summer and let in light/heat during winter
  • Install automated/smart controls
  • Plant a summer veggie or herb garden to cut down on what you have to buy from stores. Herbs: EASY to grow at home and avoid those pricey/wasteful little plastic clamshell packages!
  • Plant a pollinator garden to help our local pollinators thrive (check out your local seed libraries)

Large:

These solutions are the most time-consuming, costly, and will likely require the help of a professional. However, there are many local, state, and federal incentives and rebates available to help make these upgrades much more manageable.  For starters, switching your home to all-electric (removing all fossil fuels) is the most effective way to reduce carbon emissions and simultaneously improve the health and safety of your home. And remember, The Inflation Reduction Act is designed to incentivize low carbon outcomes while saving you money.  Visit Rewiring America (https://www.rewiringamerica.org/app/ira-calculator) and calculate your potential cost savings on the following measures:

  • Update your home’s envelope (install better insulation, reduce thermal bridging, upgrade to more energy-efficient windows and doors, etc.)
  • Install a Heat Pump Water Heater or Solar Water Heater
  • Replace your furnace with an air-source, ground-source (geothermal), or water-source heat pump
  • Install solar panels (ie. Photovoltaics or PVs) on your roof, or in your yard
  • Get an electric car and install EV charging

It’s not all about energy. Managing stormwater on your property is an effective and essential form of stewardship that is generally low-tech and easy to do.

 

Incentives & Rebates

The Inflation Reduction Act is a monumental step in the direction toward clean and renewable energy.  Through a variety of financial and tax incentives for home owners and commercial entities, the IRA makes the switch to clean, renewable energy more affordable. A variety of state, municipal, and utility programs also provide financial incentives for making the switch to clean energy.  Check out the resources below, and visit often, as these programs are evolving:

Federal 

Rewiring America (Inflation Reduction Act (IRA))

  • https://www.rewiringamerica.org/app/ira-calculator

WA State 

Seattle City Light

Seattle Public Utilities

Puget Sound Energy 

Bellingham

Spokane 

Clark County 

Mason County 

Pierce County 

King County (RainWise)

King and Snohomish County 

 

Other Resources

The Northwest Eco Building Guild has many useful resources and links on their website: https://www.ecobuilding.org/

If you are curious to know how other homeowners have incorporated sustainable features into their properties, the annual NW Eco Building Guild’s Green Home Tour is a great way to see these strategies in action: https://nwgreenhometour.org/

Tool Libraries – where you can rent almost any type of tool you can think of

Ridwell – recycles common household waste that is not normally accepted by municipalities (such as plastic film, lightbulbs, batteries, etc)

Imperfect Produce – rescues food with imperfections that does not make it to our grocery stores but that is perfectly fine to eat 

Ballard Reuse – a place to find preloved building materials

Second Use – a place to find preloved building materials

 

 

Posted in Committee on the Environment, Committees

Committee on Homelessness letter to City of Seattle

AIA Seattle’s Committee on Homelessness (COHO) advocated for adding housing capacity, speeding up housing production and lessening code requirements in a letter addressing the City’s recent position put forward in the Amicus Curiae brief to the Supreme Court of the United States in support of the Petitioner, City of Grants Pass. AIA Seattle implores the City to adopt a comprehensive plan, policies, and regulations to increase availability of all types of housing.

Related Links:

Posted in Advocacy, Committee on Homelessness, Housing, Public Policy Board

Register Now for Our Upcoming Code Mode Seminars

Join us for four upcoming seminars to learn from Code experts. 

Seminar 1 | Code Mode | Code Flexibility (Alternative Code Approaches)
March 19-20, 2024 // ONLINE // 12:00PM – 2:00PM PT on both days // Class Credit: 4 LU/HSW

Seminar 2 | Code Mode | Understanding the Seattle Existing Building Code
May 14-15, 2024 // ONLINE // 12:00PM – 2:00PM PT// Class Credit:  4 LU/HSW

Seminar 3 | TOPIC TBA
September 10-11, 2024 // ONLINE // 12:00PM – 2:00PM PT on both days //Class Credit: 4 LU/HSW

Seminar 4 | Topic TBA
October 28, 2024 // IN PERSON //Location TBC // 9:00AM – 1:00PM PT //Class Credit: 4 LU/HSW

*Stay tuned for additional information about these exciting programs! Details are provided approximately 6-8 weeks before the program date(s). All session dates and times subject to change.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2024 CODE SERIES SPONSORS

WoodWorks – Wood Products Council | Hargis Engineers |  Jensen Hughes

 Pella Windows & Doors of Western Washington


CODE COMMITTEE

Special thanks to the Code Committee for planning this series of sessions!

COMMITTEE CHAIRS:

Ana Parke, AIA

Leonard Ruff, AIA


Program, Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Senior Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Zee Mars, Development Manager at AIA Seattle

Posted in Allied Professionals, Architects, Associates, Code, For the Profession, For the Public, Member Firms, Recent Graduates, Sponsors, Students

Advocacy Update – January 2024

Photo: The 2024 Washington state legislative session gets underway in the House of Representatives on Jan. 8, 2024. (Laurel Demkovich/Washington State Standard)

2024 Legislative Session Begins

The 2024 legislative session kicked off on January 8 with a flurry of activities, including opening ceremonies, caucus priorities, and the House passing several bills from the last session to the Senate. This “short session” is set to run until March 7, presenting a tight 60-day window for addressing a myriad of policy, politics, and supplemental budgets.

Legislative leaders have outlined key focus areas, including housing, transportation, behavioral health, public safety, climate change, and education. Already, a record-breaking 932 new bills have been introduced within the first week, indicating a busy session ahead. In addition to newly introduced bills, all bills that did not pass during the 2023 session are still alive this year.

As we navigate through the initial weeks, legislators are deeply engaged in policy and fiscal committees, participating in public hearings and voting on bills. This first major deadline of the session is on January 31, when all bills must pass out of their respective policy committees to remain alive. This is closely followed by the fiscal committee cutoff, when all bills must pass out of their respective fiscal committees to advance.

Adding a unique dynamic to this session are six citizen initiatives aiming directly at key Democratic priorities in tax, environmental, public safety, and education policy.

Looking back on the first week, our priority companion rolling clock bills, HB 1880 and SB 5794, were both heard in committee. As a reminder, these bills seek to eliminate the rolling clock, an arbitrary five-year period in which applicants must pass all six divisions of the licensing exam, from Washington state statute. Both bills were slightly amended to allow a one-month delay to the implementation date to accommodate DOL and voted out unanimously out of their respective committees. The bills now sit in Rules in both the House and Senate, awaiting the opportunity to be pulled to the floor for a vote.

Additionally, HB 2008, which creates a task force to ascertain the primary factors driving housing costs in Washington, was passed out of the policy committee. AIAWA met with the prime sponsor to express the need for representation from our industry on the taskforce, and the bill was amended to accommodate.

Other bills of interest – including those related to AI regulation, co-living housing, lot splitting, parking flexibility, and transit-oriented development – were also heard in the policy committee:

  • SB 5838– AI Taskforce – Public hearing in Senate on 1/10 and Executive session scheduled for 1/19
  • HB 1998SB 5901 Co-living Housing- Passed out of House Housing Committee on 1/11 and referred to Rules Committee. Public hearing in Senate Local Government Committee on 1/9.
  • HB 1245 Lot Splitting – Returning from last session, HB 1245 was voted off the House Floor on 1/8. It has been referred to the Senate Local Government Committee.
  • SB 6015 Parking Flexibility – Public hearing in Senate Local Government Committee on 1/11.
  • HB 2160 /SB 6024 Transit Oriented Development – Passed out of House Housing Committee on 1/15 and Public Hearing in Senate Local Government Committee on 1/11.

Please reach out to Samantha if you’d like to get involved in AIAWA policy committees or see an up-to-date version of our 2024 bill tracker.

AIA Washington | Capitol Connections

AIAWA members will head to Olympia for an in-person Capitol Connections event on January 23, 2024. Members will be discussing the rolling clock, HB 1880 & SB 5794, along with the Energy Upgrade Navigator Program, HB 1391.

This lobby day promises not only to be impactful but also an enjoyable experience for both members and legislators alike. Your participation is crucial in making our collective voice heard on these important matters to help shape our industry’s future for the better.


We’d love to hear from you! For more information on advocacy topics, please contact:

Samantha Morrow | Senior Manager of Policy & Advocacy, AIA Washington Council & AIA Seattle

Posted in Advocacy

2024 Call for Nominations AIA Seattle Board + College of Fellows


Board Nominations

Would you or someone you know make a great AIA Seattle Board Member? To learn more about board service, see the Board Role Description. To apply, please fill out this form by February 7! Nominations received by this date will be prioritized for review by the Membership Advancement Steering Committee, which vets potential board members for service through the 2024 nomination cycle. The three-year term of service begins September 1, 2024.

  • Emerging Professional/Student Board Position: AIA Seattle’s nominating committee is also inviting applications for an emerging professional or student as a non-voting participant in the board space for one year of service. This is a paid position to bring diverse perspectives into the Board leadership space.
  • For more information, see the Emerging Professional Role description. Please upload a statement of interest and resume here.

All nominees will be asked to disclose any violations of the AIA Code of Ethics in the last seven years. Please review the AIA Code of Ethics here.


Nominations for College of Fellows

Fellowship is one of the highest national honors the AIA can bestow upon a member. Register for our online program The Path to Fellowship to learn more about the College of Fellows eligibility and submittal process. To nominate yourself, or a peer for Fellowship, please fill out this form by March 15!

Fellowship FAQS

  • Why should you put yourself, or a colleague, forward for the nomination process? Candidates for the College of Fellows must be nominated by either their assigned component or by a petition signed by any five Fellows in good standing or any 10 architect members in good standing. By completing our nomination process, you are putting yourself forward for component nomination. This means that you won’t need to complete the petition process, and that you’ll have the support of our amazing Fellows + Honors Committee, who will coach you through the submission process.
  • What key dates should you mark on your calendar?
    • March 15Deadline to complete nomination form to be considered for component nomination
    • JuneCoaching sessions begin for selected nominees
    • Summer & FallWorking sessions to finalize your submission
    • Early OctoberSubmission deadline for the 2025 College of Fellows cycle
  • How can you get a better sense of the scope of work required for this process? Review the example submissions that National has provided on their website. You can also request specific examples that aren’t currently provided by reaching out directly to the archivist!
  • What happens after you submit in October? The jury will review submissions and will announce the 2025 College of Fellows in early 2025. If you are not selected during this round, you will have two additional years to apply for consideration.

Questions? Please reach out to Anthony Collins, Senior Coordinator of Member Engagement for support.

Posted in Fellows and Honors, Home Page

Doug Ito FAIA Receives the 2024 AIA Whitney M. Young Jr. Award

Doug Ito, a managing principle of SMR Architects, was awarded the 2024 AIA Whitney M. Young Jr. Award, a distinguished national honor presented by the AIA annually since 1972. This award is bestowed upon an architect or organization that profoundly demonstrates social responsibility and actively addresses critical social issues such as affordable housing, inclusiveness, or universal accessibility.

As this year’s recipient, Doug has been recognized by his peers for his leadership in affordable housing and embodying the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion through his work. By receiving this award, he has also earned the high distinction of elevation to Fellowship within the AIA. Read more at aia.org.

Posted in Uncategorized

Advocacy Update – December 2023

AIA Washington

Register for Capitol Connections

Registration is open for Capitol Connections on January 23, 2024, where AIA Washington will be discussing the rolling clock bill. This event will be a great opportunity to connect with your legislators and share how this policy has impacted your professional journey.

This lobby day promises not only to be impactful but also an enjoyable experience for both members and legislators. Your participation is crucial in making our collective voice heard on this important matter that will help shape our industry’s future for the better.

Please register by Dec. 22nd here.

 

AIA Seattle

Building Emissions Standards

Seattle’s Building Emissions Performance Standards (BEPS) was voted out of committee on Dec. 8th with unanimous support. The BEPS initiative is a critical step towards advancing energy efficiency and decarbonization in our existing buildings, complementing Seattle’s robust building energy codes. BEPS will be voted on in the full city council meeting on December 12th at 2:00pm.

  • Date/Time: Tuesday, December 12, 2023. 2:00 p.m.
  • Location: Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Ave, Seattle, WA 98104
  • Leave public comments here
Posted in Advocacy

Advocacy Update – November 2023

Photo: Judkins Junction, an affordable housing project at Jackson Street and 23rd Avenue South in Seattle. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times, 2020)

LOCAL NEWS

Passage of the 2023 Seattle Housing Levy

We are thrilled to announce a historic victory for affordable housing in Seattle with the overwhelming passage of the 2023 Seattle Housing Levy, boasting an impressive 68.97% support from voters. The approved $970 million levy represents the largest city investment over the next seven years, addressing Seattle’s affordable housing crisis and preventing homelessness. The unanimous endorsement by the Seattle City Council underscores a year-long effort involving extensive stakeholder engagement, thoughtful policy development, and collaboration with leaders and organizations. The levy’s goals include creating over 3,100 new affordable homes, stabilizing supportive housing workforce wages, and preventing homelessness for over 9,000 low-income individuals and families.

STATE NEWS

Call for Public Participation: State Building Code Council Hearings on Proposed Energy Code Changes

The State Building Code Council invites you to participate in public hearings regarding proposed changes to the 2021 Washington State Energy Code (WAC 51-11C and WAC 51-11R). The proposal addresses the federal Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 preemption issues within the 2021 Washington State Energy Code, as interpreted in the recent U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruling in CRA vs. City of Berkeley.

Details of Public Hearings:

  • Date/Time: Tuesday, November 21, 2023. 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • Location: Yakima City Hall, 129 N 2nd Street, Yakima, WA 98101
  • Join via Zoom | Phone: 888 788 0099 | Webinar ID: 972 3088 0592

OR

  • Date/Time: Wednesday, November 22, 2023. 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • Location: DES Building, Room 1213, 1500 Jefferson St, Olympia, WA 98501
  • Join via Zoom | Phone: 888 788 0099 | Webinar ID: 947 6740 2058

Complete the Public Testimony Sign-Up Sheet at least 30 minutes before the hearing.

If you would like to provide written comments, testimony must be sent to SBCC@des.wa.gov and received by 5:00 pm on November 22, 2023.

Register for Capitol Connections

Registration is now open for Capitol Connections on January 23, 2024, where AIA Washington will be discussing the rolling clock bill. This event will be a great opportunity to connect with your legislators and share how this policy has impacted your professional journey.

This lobby day promises not only to be impactful, but also an enjoyable experience for both members and legislators. Your participation is crucial in making our collective voice heard on this important matter that will help shape our industry’s future for the better. Register now!

Posted in Advocacy

2023 Honor Award Winners

2023 Awards of Honor winners Collage
SEATTLE, November 6, 2023 – Last night, AIA Seattle hosted the 73rd annual Honor Awards for Washington Architecture to celebrate excellence in design. The distinguished jury included:

From 113 submissions, the jury chose 21 award winners from three categories – Built, Conceptual, and Research & Innovation. Across the broad view of project types, the jury acknowledged the strong design culture represented in our region that collectively and beautifully expresses the feel and culture of this place. “Along with holding onto beauty, we must also consider solutions to the myriad of issues we currently face – these projects represent inspired problem solving that defined space for those human experiences and environmental sensitivity.”

In addition to the main juried awards, it was the sixth year of the Young Voices Selection (YVS), a program with the aim to engage and elevate the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in the Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. The three YVS panelists Max Hunold (GO’C), Shoshanna Sidell (SkB Architects), Yubei ‘Stacy’ Song (NBBJ), selected 1 Built project as the Young Voices Selection winner.

Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to our esteemed jury, moderator, and Honor Awards Committee! All of this would not have been possible without you.

 

Visit the 2023 Honor Awards Digital Publication and the Online Gallery to learn more about the projects, as well as project team and collaborator information. Missed the live show? You can catch the replay here!

AWARD OF HONOR

Wing Luke Elementary School by NAC Architecture replaces a building on the same site to serve a growing multicultural community. The design was master planned for a future 12-classroom expansion that would increase the capacity to 650 students. Sizing the core facilities to support the larger size is a long-term approach for a neighborhood expecting significant growth throughout the life of the school. The jury appreciated the attention to detail and craftsmanship that lead to every space being meant for curiosity and engagement for the attendees of the school.

 

Winthrop Library by Johnston Architects and Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects takes inspiration from the features, scale, and beauty of the natural environment of Washington’s Methow Valley. The site, a nexus of community life in the valley, is near a trailhead, a preschool, a care facility for elders, and an interpretive center that tells the story of the indigenous Methow people. The jury appreciated the beauty in its simplicity and felt it was a restoration of civic spirit and a space that allowed the mind to expand.

 

 

The Rambler by GO’C is a modestly sized house located northwest of Seattle on the Kitsap Peninsula and built by the local community. The design and building of the house involved close collaboration with over thirty local makers in the community, exploring a level of craft and trust made possible from relationships forged over years of working together. The jury appreciated the elevation and revealing of the creative process and preservation of the landscape while also celebrating community providing for neighbors.

 

 

Seattle Children’s Building Care: Diagnostic and Treatment Facility by ZGF Architects is phase two of a one-million-square-foot expansion outlined in Seattle Children’s Major Institution Master Plan, bringing the hospital one step closer to maximizing development capacity on its Laurelhurst campus amid historic and anticipated growth. A key design driver was to create horizontal connections across campus, allowing high-acuity patients to be transported from treatment spaces to inpatient beds via the shortest distance possible. The jury appreciated the use of light, wayfinding and gracious gathering spaces that allowed for a sense of peace in a place that is for families going through a hard time.

 

Seattle Ferry Terminal by NBBJ replaces the decades-old Colman Dock. It is the first public building west of Alaskan Way on the waterfront, healing the scar left behind by the recent viaduct demolition. Celebrating the historic Washington State Ferries system and the beauty of the Pacific Northwest, the Seattle Ferry Terminal reconnects the urban fabric following the viaduct demolition with a new transportation gateway that once again connects City to Sound. The jury appreciated the elevation of an infrastructure experience that gave well proportioned clarity to a project with multiple layers of complexity.

 

 

ENERGY IN DESIGN AWARD

Inspire Apartments by Public47 Architects is a 6-story building that generates 108% of the annual energy for its 42 residential units, and is the first multifamily building to participate in Seattle’s Living Building Pilot Program (LBPP). The project includes triple-glazed windows, a heat-recovery ventilation system, and an energy dashboard in the lobby to display energy production and use, giving tenants a visible feedback loop.

 

 

Special thanks to the University of Washington Integrated Design Lab (IDL) and sponsor BetterBricks for their partnership on the Energy in Design Award.

AWARD OF MERIT

Dockside by Cone Architecture
800 Fifth Avenue by Olson Kundig
North Campus Housing by KieranTimberlake
Health Sciences Education Building, University of Washington by The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP
Grand Avenue Park Bridge by LMN Architects
Modular Mass Timber Homes by atelierjones

HONORABLE MENTION

Seattle Convention Center Summit Building by LMN Architects
Basalt Canyon Shelter by Workshop AD
Courtyard Residence by mwworks
Quinalt Wellness Center by Rice Fergus Miller
Fishermen’s Terminal Innovation District by The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP (Conceptual)
Mary’s Place Family Center by Graphite Design Group (Research & Innovation)
Crow (Apsáalooke) Dance Arbor by 7 Directions Architects/Planners
Mural Restoration and Installation by Todd Lawson A+D
Orenda at Othello Square by Weber Thompson

YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Modular Mass Timber Homes by atelierjones

 

To view all 113 submissions to the 2023 Honor Awards, visit the Online Gallery!

 

 

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Honor Awards

Advocacy Update – October 2023

Photo: Doug Walker

LOCAL NEWS

Public Hearing on Proposed Transportation Impact Fees

Last week, the Seattle City Council voted to expedite an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan concerning transportation impact fees. The proposal has been sent to the full Council for a public hearing on November 7th at 2:00 pm.

Council Bill 120635 aims to amend the transportation element of the Comprehensive Plan, specifying how transportation impact fees would be implemented and which projects could receive funding. It’s important to note that any decision to officially adopt these fees will be made at a later date.

We encourage our members to participate in the public hearing and share their perspectives. You can testify during the council meeting on November 7th. This presents a valuable opportunity for AIA Seattle members to testify as individuals to provide insights and expertise regarding the potential impact of these changes on the architectural landscape in Seattle.

Seattle’s 2024 Budget Deliberations

Starting on September 27, 2023, the Seattle City Council began its annual budget deliberations, following the delivery of Mayor Bruce Harrell’s proposed 2024 Budget Adjustments. This process directly impacts the allocation of resources in our city and the overall quality of life for Seattle residents.

Here’s how you can get informed and make your voice heard:

  1. Watch Budget Meetings: The City Council conducted all-day budget meetings last week to review the proposed adjustments. Recordings of these meetings are available to view anytime.
  2. Public Comment Opportunities: As the Budget Committee continues its work, you have an opportunity share your comments verbally on Friday, October 27th. You can sign up to speak two hours before the session, whether in person or remotely.
  3. Public Hearings: In addition, the Council is holding public hearings dedicated to hearing from the public about their budget priorities. Again, you can sign up to speak two hours before the session, either in person or remotely. The upcoming hearing is on Monday, November 13, 2023, at 5:00 PM.
  4. Provide Written Feedback: The City encourages you to share your insights in writing anytime.
  5. Resources for Understanding the Budget: The City has created tools to help you understand Seattle’s budget, and there’s an interactive guide for those new to the process.

Your involvement is vital in ensuring that the budget reflects the needs and aspirations of our community, including the architectural and design aspects that make our city vibrant and livable.

STATE NEWS

AIA Washington’s Push to Eliminate Restrictive “Rolling Clock” Policy

The recent decision by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) to retire the “rolling clock” policy, which imposed a five-year expiration on passed divisions of the Architect Registration Examination, is a significant move towards fostering inclusivity and diversity within our industry.

However, Washington state remains one of the last two states where this policy is written into statute, presenting a significant challenge for aspiring architects. In response, AIAWA will spearhead a bill during the upcoming legislative session to eliminate this restrictive policy, and we need your support!

If you have a compelling story about how the rolling clock policy has affected your journey to licensure, we want to hear from you! Reach out to Tammie Sueirro or Samantha Morrow to provide your perspective and learn more about opportunities to share your story with the Legislature. Your voice and stories can make a real difference in this effort.

Moreover, mark your calendars for Capitol Connections on January 23, 2024, where AIA Washington will be discussing the rolling clock bill. This event will be a great opportunity to connect with your legislators and share how this policy has impacted your professional journey.

This lobby day promises not only to be impactful but also an enjoyable experience for both members and legislators. Your participation is crucial in making our collective voice heard on this important matter that will help shape our industry’s future for the better.

Stay tuned for more information.

Advocacy in Action

AIAWA is excited to announce the return of our Advocacy in Action series, an informative two-part webinar program designed to empower you as architect advocates. This series is tailored to emerging professionals and students but is open to everyone who is passionate about advocating for issues that matter to them.

Part One: Advocacy 101

  • Date: November 9, 2023
  • Time: 12:00 pm
  • Location: Online

In the first installment on November 9, you will delve into the essentials of advocacy. Discover how AIAWA works to safeguard our profession and address critical issues. Learn how you, as an architect, can play a pivotal role in shaping the future and engaging on matters important to you. This session will equip you with the knowledge and tools needed to become an effective advocate.

Part Two: 2024 Legislative Session Preview

  • Date: December 7, 2023
  • Time: 12:00 pm
  • Location: Online

Part two of the series will serve as preview of what to expect in the 2024 legislative session. Gain insights into the upcoming legislative agenda and how it impacts the architectural field. Stay ahead of the curve and be prepared to actively engage in the legislative process.

Whether you’re an emerging professional, a seasoned architect, or simply someone who cares deeply about the issues that shape our profession, this series is for you. Join us to strengthen your advocacy skills and make a meaningful impact.

Click here to register - white text on red button

We look forward to your participation in the Advocacy in Action series.

NATIONAL NEWS

AIA National Campaign for R&D Tax Credit Fix

AIA National has issued a call to action for its members to contribute their voices and stories to their campaign aimed at advocating for a fix to the R&D (174) tax credit. This campaign targets key members of Congress, including Senator Cantwell of Washington.

Recent changes to the tax R&D tax credit have raised concerns about its impact on architectural firms, prompting the need for urgent action.

AIA Seattle members are encouraged to share their personal experiences, stories, and insights related to the changes in the 174 credit. These testimonials will serve as valuable resources to the AIA National campaign to persuade Congress to act.

To contribute your story or insights, please email Stephanie Lamore.

Posted in Advocacy

Advocacy Update – September 2023

Photo: Jared Wenzelburger, The Chronicle

SBCC Advances Energy Code Amendments with Revised Effective Date

In a recent meeting, the State Building Code Council (SBCC) made significant strides in advancing energy code amendments that promise to shape the future of construction and energy efficiency in our state. Here are the key highlights from the SBCC’s latest decisions:
Energy Code Amendments Move Forward: The SBCC voted decisively to move forward with crucial energy code amendments. These amendments aim to enhance the energy efficiency of buildings, promoting sustainability and environmental responsibility.
Effective Date Postponed: In response to the need for a robust public comment process and consideration of legislative sessions, the SBCC has decided to delay the effective date of the new energy codes. Originally scheduled for October 29, 2023, the codes will now take effect on March 15, 2024. This extension allows for a thorough and inclusive rulemaking process.
Proposed Revisions Foster Efficiency: The proposed revisions to both residential and commercial energy codes have undergone rigorous evaluation by technical committees. They strike a balance between maintaining code stringency and encouraging high-efficiency electric appliances, all while avoiding mandatory heat pump installation.
Gas Appliances and Total Energy Performance: For those who opt for gas appliances, the proposed revisions require that they achieve the same total energy performance as a building equipped with heat pumps. This incentivizes energy efficiency across various appliance choices.
Flexibility Through Credit-Based Scaling: The SBCC’s proposed code measures introduce a credit-based scale, providing builders and property owners with flexibility while ensuring adherence to climate-friendly standards. This approach aligns with the Council’s commitment to sustainable building practices.
A Response to Legal Considerations: These actions by the SBCC are a response to a recent decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals concerning preemption by the federal law known as EPCA (Energy Policy and Conservation Act). The decision underscores the importance of flexibility in energy code regulations, especially in relation to heat pump mandates.

Exciting Opportunities with AIA Washington Council

AIA Washington Council (AIA|WA) is offering two incredible opportunities for passionate individuals to make a meaningful impact on the profession. Read on to learn about these exciting roles and how you can be a part of shaping the future of architecture.

1. State/Territory Associates (STAR) Representative to the AIA National Associates Committee (NAC)

The AIA National Associates Committee (NAC) represents associates from various paths in the field of architecture and plays a crucial role in addressing both local and national issues. AIA|WA is seeking candidates for the position of STAR Representative to NAC. As a STAR Representative, you will serve as the voice of Washington State’s associate members and contribute to shaping new policies. This 2-year commitment offers a unique opportunity to connect with peers from across the country, advocate for the profession, and build lasting friendships.

Key Details:
Application Deadline: September 30, 2023
Eligibility: AIA Associate members in good standing within Washington State
Commitment: Regular meetings, conferences, and board responsibilities
Application Process: Submit a one-page letter, resume, and two letters of reference

2. Board Associates Program
Are you interested in gaining valuable non-profit management and board governance experience? AIA Washington Council’s Board Associates Program is designed for AIA members within the state of Washington. This program offers a 15 to 27-month term as a non-voting board member, providing a unique opportunity to enhance your leadership skills, collaborate with industry professionals, and contribute to the architecture community.

Key Details:
Eligibility: AIA or Associate AIA members working in the AEC industry with 1-10 years of experience
Commitment: Active participation in board meetings, policy committees, and collaborative projects
Benefits: Mentorship, networking opportunities, and career growth activities

Both of these opportunities offer a chance to make a significant impact on the architecture profession and connect with like-minded individuals who share your passion. Whether you’re interested in representing your peers at a national level or gaining hands-on experience in board governance, AIA | WA has a place for you!
Don’t miss out on these fantastic opportunities! If you are interested in applying for either of these roles, learn more here or contact Tammie Sueirro.

Join us in shaping the future of architecture in Washington State and beyond!

Release of Seattle’s Draft Comp Plan Expected Late Fall

Originally slated to be shared in June, the release of the Draft Comprehensive Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) is now expected sometime in late fall.

The delay is driven by OPCD’s commitment to creating a Plan that accurately reflects the aspirations and concerns of the community. By allowing for more time, they aim to carefully integrate the feedback received, address evolving state regulations, and give full consideration to the significance of issues addressed in the Plan.

As the release date approaches, members are encouraged to stay engaged in the Comp Plan Work Group and continue offering their perspectives to shape the future of their neighborhoods and environment.

Posted in Advocacy

2023 Call for AHC Board Members

White text on purple background: Architecture for Health Committee

·         Architect member – Washington (5-year term)
·         Replacement Architect member – Washington (Completion of vacant position. 3yrs remain in term)
·         Affiliate member – Oregon  (2-year term)

Architect Board Member Jenny Cestnik and Affiliate Board Member Jerrod Kowalewski will be completing their terms this year. We thank them for their considerable contributions and years of generous service!

We also have a unique opportunity this year to fill a board position that was vacated before term completion.  If you’ve every considered serving but the 5-year commitment seemed like too much, now’s the time to strike!

AHC Board Structure and Terms

The AHC Board consists of five Architects and two Affiliate Members from Washington and Oregon.

Architect Board Member Requirements

·     Practicing member of an architectural professional firm with an office in the State of Washington
·     Primary residence in the State of Washington
·     AIA Member
·     Licensure is not required, but strongly encouraged (committee requirement of three licensed professionals has been met by remaining board members)
·     5-year term commitment beginning on January 1, 2024, with attendance at the December 2023 board retreat, date TBD

Replacement Architect Board Member Requirements

·     Practicing member of an architectural professional firm with an office in the State of Washington
·     Primary residence in the State of Washington
·     AIA Member
·     Licensure is not required, but strongly encouraged (committee requirement of three licensed professionals has been met by remaining board members)
·     Past board members welcome to apply
·     3-year term commitment beginning on January 1, 2024 with attendance at the December 2023 board retreat, date TBD
·     Please note, this position is filling a vacant position and therefore the selected member will directly move to position of Washington Co-Chair, where they will serve for two years in this role.

Affiliate Member Requirement

·     Practicing member in a healthcare design and construction field with an office in the State of Oregon
·     Primary residence in the State of Oregon (or major metropolitan region)
·     Open to engineers, contractors, interior designers, vendors, Owner’s representatives, or similar.
·     2-year term commitment beginning on January 1, 2024 with attendance at the December 2023 board retreat, date TBD

Architect members cycle through the following annual leadership positions during their tenure: Recorder, Outreach, Co-Chair (2 years), and Past Chair

Affiliate members do not cycle through the leadership positions but serve in an advisory role and are actively involved in planning and organizing AHC events throughout their tenure.

AHC Board Responsibilities

Responsibilities of the board include establishing educational topics, planning programs, arranging venues and speakers, moderating programs and outreach to professionals and academic communities in the Northwest region.

Programs are held three to four times a year in both Oregon and Washington. Board meetings are held virtually on a monthly basis.

Application

If you are interested in serving on the AHC Board, please send an email expressing your interest in a position and include a brief description of your background in healthcare design to the AHC Board at  by noon on Tuesday, October 10, 2023. Please specify which position you are applying for and if applying for the architect from WA role, please indicate your willingness to serve in the 5-year or 3-year term.   The current board will review applications and make selections at their next scheduled meeting on October 12, 2023.

If you are selected, you must be available for our annual all day board retreat in early December. 

Posted in AHC, Architecture for Health Committee

2023 Honor Awards | Submittals FAQs

Visit the 2023 Honor Awards page and download the 2023 Call for Submissions + Guidelines for details about requirements, submission categories, and submitter eligibility. If you still have questions, we hope this FAQ page will help! The final submission deadline is September 27, 2023.


ABOUT SUBMITTING

Do I have to start and finish my submission in one session?
No. Submitters can start, save, and return to draft submissions at any point until submissions close (5:00pm PT on September 27). To return to a draft submission, log in to your Submittable account (www.aiaseattle.submittable.com/submit) and select the “Saved Drafts” tab. We highly recommendcompleting your submission(s) well ahead of the final deadline.  

Can I still submit after the September 13“early bird” submission deadline?
Yes. Please note that prices go up 15% after 5:00 pm PT on September 13. 

Can I submit out-of-state and/or out-of-country projects?
Yes, just make sure the projects were completed or initiated within the last 5 years (after November 2018), and the submitter eligibility requirements are met (for example, at least one architect on the design team of a BUILT submission must be licensed in the state of WA). See the 2023 Call for Submissions + Guidelines for eligibility requirements. 

How will I know my submission has been received?
Upon completing payment and clicking “SUBMIT” you will receive a confirmation e-mail message from Submittable. If you do not, please e-mail zoeg@aiaseattle.org. 

What if I already finalized my submission(completed payment and clicked ‘SUBMIT’) and need to make a change due to an entry or upload error?
Please submit an “Edit Request” on your submitter interface in Submittable before submissions close on September 27, or e-mail zoeg@aiaseattle.org immediately. We will be in touch to help resolve any errors before the deadline.  

Can I re-submit a project I have submitted in the past?
Yes, but only if the project has not yet been recognized and still meets eligibility criteria. In fact, we encourage submitters to re-submit as every year and every jury is different. We have seen projects get awarded on their second or third submission. You never know if this could be your year!  

Where can I get inspired by award-winning project submissions?
Refer to past galleries and check out the 2022 award winners and 2021 award winners. Plus, members of the Honor Awards Committee recorded two What Makes a Good Submission? video resources to demonstrate how some of the past winners crafted their project story, which you can view here and here. 

When will the jury be announced?
In early September. Stay tuned, and don’t wait to get started on your submission in the meantime! 

When will the 2023Online Gallery be available for public viewing?
By October 5. All projects will be listed anonymously until the winners are announced at the Live Event on November 6. 


ABOUT THE COMMON APP

I’m submitting a project to the BUILT submission category. Do I have to complete the 2023 Common App for Design Excellence, even if I don’t intend to win the Energy in Design Award?  

Yes. Regardless of intent to achieve 2030 Challenge targets or be awarded the Energy in Design Award, we ask ALL entrants in the BUILT category to submit energy data. Please make sure you’ve downloaded the 2023 Common App, as we make refinements each year.  

I am new to completing the Common App. Can someone help me fill it out? 

Yes! The following resources are available to support submitters with the Common App:   

  • Attend Common App Office Hours on September 7 at 12:00PM (Zoom)  
  • Integrated Design Lab is available to offer technical support for the Common App until September 26 at 5:00pm PT. E-mail Teresa Moroseos (teresafm@uw.edu) with the subject line “AIA Seattle Common App” with questions.    

Do I need to complete every field in the Common App?
No. Refer to the legend in the Common App for minimum required fields. We ask that all applicable BUILT submitters do their best to complete the full form. Fill out as much info as you have! 

Does the Common App generate a score for my project?
No. The Common App is primarily used for the jury to evaluate projects, particularly for the Energy in Design Award. To qualify for the Energy in Design Award, the submitted project must meet the 2030 Challenge criteria or better. AIA Seattle and the Integrated Design Lab also use the data to track metrics over time, and we hope to identify more opportunities to share findings broadly. 

Do all AIA chapters use the Common App as part of their awards submission process?
No. However, at least two dozen chapters are using some form of the Common App and/or the Framework for Design Excellence in their awards program, and COTE National hopes to expand this reach. AIA Seattle has been a leader in using this tool as part of the Honor Awards for Washington Architecture since 2020 after sunsetting the Energy in Design Award Calculator (previously used to evaluate projects for the Energy in Design Award since 2016). The AIA Seattle chapter champions the role of architects as leaders in positive climate action as a core imperative.  


ABOUT THE LIVE EVENT

Where can I purchase tickets to this year’sLive Event?
More information about the 2023 Honor Awards Live Event will be shared broadly and sent to submitters near submissions close. We have some exciting updates we can’t reveal quite yet! For now, save the date for the evening of Monday, November 6! 


ABOUT SOMETHING ELSE

Questions about Submitting? Contact Programs Manager, Zoe Guckenheimer

Questions about attending the Live Event? Contact Senior Programs Coordinator, Andrea Aguilera

Questions about Sponsorship? Contact Executive Director, Melissa K. Neher

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Honor Awards

2023 Honor Awards

Click here for online gallery


LIVE EVENT ON NOVEMBER 6 AT TOWN HALL SEATTLE

The Honor Awards for Washington Architecture is AIA Seattle’s annual marquee program, drawing hundreds of attendees to a lecture-style event of unique rigor and breadth. This nationally-recognized program provides an important opportunity for the design community to share and celebrate its achievements, both among practitioners and with the community at-large.

Click here for more info


THE JURY PROCESS

Every year, jurors praise submissions that reveal the story behind the marketing images. What concepts and considerations drove the design? How did the design team creatively address the project parameters and client goals? Did the true design intent materialize in the project? What is the project’s benefit or impact? Ultimately, what makes this an award winning project? Submitters were encouraged to use the project narrative, captions, and inclusion of process work as opportunities to tell a design story.

In addition to the jury’s own criteria, the AIA Seattle community has identified four considerations for the submission review process: Inspiration, Problem-Solving, Environmental Sensitivity, Social Impact. The integration of the Common App into the submission process also raises awareness of the Framework for Design Excellence.

Jury Deliberations will occur during Jury Weekend in Seattle, November 3-6, 2023:

  • Friday, November 3 | The jury arrives, having reviewed all submitted projects ahead of time.
  • Saturday, November 4 | The jury deliberates and determines a shortlist of projects. From this shortlist, they will determine which eligible BUILT projects they would like to visit.
    • The Honor Awards Committee will contact Site Visit Contacts on Saturday to coordinate Sunday visits. Site Visit Contacts must be authorized to organize a hosted site visit on Sunday, November 5.
    • SITE VISITS ARE ANONYMOUS. The project design team shall not be present.
  • Sunday, November 5 | Site visits occur, followed by the jury finalizing their selection of this year’s award recipients for all award categories.
  • Monday, November 6 | The jury will discuss and present their official award selections for the first time on-stage at the Live Event at Town Hall Seattle.

Awards are the final determination of the jury.


MEET THE JURY

Katie Ackerly AIA, LEED AP, CPHC | David Baker ArchitectsBerkeley, CA
Katie Ackerly, AIA, is Principal and Sustainable Design Director at David Baker Architects, an award-winning architecture firm known for elevating the design of multi-family housing. Katie joined DBA in 2012, and over the years has brought focus and heft to the firm’s sustainable design goals, positioning DBA at the forefront of decarbonization and resilience initiatives in affordable housing design and construction. Katie draws on a background in building science and energy-efficiency policy, including graduate studies with the Center for the Built Environment. She brings DBA into critical conversations and approaches to sustainable  multifamily housing, informing research reports and design guidelines and sharing her knowledge through writings and workshops. She has been active in the International Living Future Institute’s Affordable Housing pilot program and she currently leads DBA’s collaborations with RMI on several government-funded initiatives to catalyze equitable zero-carbon retrofits for existing affordable housing.
Steven Lewis, FAIA, NOMAC, LEED AP | ZGF Architects | Los Angeles, CA
Steven Lewis is an architect and a tireless advocate for social justice and diversity within the field of architecture. He is currently a principal with the firm ZGF Architects, where he leads the Los Angeles office’s urban design practice. Prior to joining ZGF, Steven was appointed to the position of Urban Design Director for the City’s Central Region, where he played a key role in shaping the vision of present and future development. Steven is the AIA 2016 Whitney M. Young, Jr. Award recipient, and was elevated to the AIA College of Fellows in December of 2015. Steven was a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Design School for the 2006-07 academic year. More than anything, Steven is a facilitator of partnerships and alliances between groups and individuals who seek to use architecture and design to effect positive change to our world.
Katie Swenson | MASS Design Group | Boston, MA
A nationally recognized design leader, researcher, writer, and educator, Katie Swenson is a Senior Principal at MASS Design Group, where she leads the Advocacy team. Katie’s work explores how critical design practice can, and should, promote economic and social equity, environmental sustainability, and healthy communities. She has over 20 years of experience in the theoretical and practical applications of design thinking and is a talented global public speaker and thought leader. A prolific writer, Katie authored Design with Love: At Home in America and In Bohemia: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Kindness. She co-authored Growing Urban Habitats: Seeking a Housing Development Model with William Morrish and Susanne Schindler. Katie was awarded the AIA Award for Excellence in Public Architecture in 2021. Prior to joining MASS, Katie was the vice president of Design & Sustainability at Enterprise Community Partners. An alumni of the Enterprise Rose Fellowship’s second class, she was tapped to lead and grow the program in 2007. Katie founded the Charlottesville Community Design Center in 2004. Katie teaches at the Parsons School of Design at The New School and lectures extensively on sustainable community development and
affordable housing.
Moderator: Joshua McNichols | KUOW | Seattle, WA
Joshua McNichols reports on growth and development for KUOW Public Radio in Seattle. Radio is Joshua’s second career. His first was in architecture: After earning a BA in Architecture from the UW, he worked in architecture firms around Seattle for about a decade. As a reporter, Joshua focuses on how we can live together in cities as climate change and economic inequality render more places inhospitable or unaffordable. He loves to interview architects and architecture students for his stories because their work often inspires faith that the future can be changed and improved. Building anything that lasts requires this faith. If you really want to get him talking, ask Joshua how a good radio story is like a building. He can give you a 20-minute answer, but like any good radio reporter, he can also boil it down to less than a minute.

YOUNG VOICES SELECTION

Initiated in 2018, the Young Voices Selection (YVS) program aims to elevate and engage the voices of young designers through direct participation and representation in AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture. Three young designers, nominated by firm leaders and selected by the Honor Awards Committee, will be given the opportunity to review, deliberate, and select ONE Built project submission. This chosen project, the “Young Voices Selection,” will be recognized at the live event in November and selected by this year’s Young Voices…

  • Max Hunold | GO’C
  • Shoshanna Sidell | SkB Architects
  • Stacy (Yubei) Song | NBBJ

QUESTIONS?

Questions about the Honor Awards? Contact Programs Manager, Zoe Guckenheimer

Questions about attending the Live Event? Contact Senior Programs Coordinator, Andrea Aguilera

Sponsorship Questions? Contact Executive Director, Melissa K. Neher


SPECIAL THANKS TO THE HONOR AWARDS COMMITTEE

Special thanks to the Honor Awards Committee who plans and executes AIA Seattle’s Honor Awards for Washington Architecture!


THANK YOU TO OUR 2023 HONOR AWARDS SPONSORS

Interior Tech | BetterBricks | Hoffman Construction Company | Arup | CBIZ Berntson Porter | Cairncross & Hempelmann | Coughlin Porter Lundeen | Fsi Engineers | GLY | Hargis Engineers, Inc.Inform Interiors | KPFF Consulting Engineers | Lane Powell | Magnusson Klemencic AssociatesMalsam Tsang Structural Engineering | Pella Windows & Doors of Western Washington | Precision Property Measurements | Quantum Consulting Engineers | Sazan | Schultz Miller | Swenson Say Fagét | Gray | citizenM Pioneer SquareFremont Brewing

Posted in For the Profession, For the Public, Honor Awards

AIA AHC Summer Happy Hour – Portland

Join the Seattle AIA Architecture for Health Community to celebrate summer by coming together for a fun-filled networking event!

Date: Wednesday August 30th 2023
Time:
4pm – 6pm
Location: 
Ecliptic Brewing – 825 North Cook Street Portland, OR 97227

Posted in Architecture for Health Committee

Advocacy Update – July 2023

Photo: MyNorthwest 

AIA National Revised Federal Research & Development Tax Credit Update

AIA National has shared an important update regarding the revised federal research and development (R&D) tax credit, which came into effect on January 1, 2023. Due to the increasing number of inquiries from concerned parties, AIA wants to ensure that everyone is well-informed about the latest updates on this matter.

Background:
In 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) brought about significant changes to the U.S. tax code. One of these changes involves an amendment to Section 174, which now requires taxpayers to capitalize and amortize R&D expenditures for tax years beginning after December 31, 2021. This change has a notable impact on firms involved in R&D activities.

Impact on R&D Tax Credit:
Additionally, the TCJA affects the eligibility for the R&D tax credit. The definition of “qualified research” has been modified to align with the new rules under Section 174. Taxpayers must now classify expenses as “specified research or experimental expenditures” under Section 174 in order to claim the Section 41 tax credit. This emphasizes the need for careful validation of Section 41 expenditures to comply with the revised requirements.

AIA’s Active Engagement:
AIA has been actively engaged on this issue since last year, working to address the challenges faced by firms. AIA continues to collaborate with business groups, collect stories from AIA members, and advocate for revisions to the new law in order to achieve statutory corrections (including retroactive measures).

Legislative Progress:
Encouragingly, a bipartisan bill known as the American Innovation and Jobs Act (S. 866) has been reintroduced in the Senate, with a House bill recently introduced (bill number pending). While these reintroductions are positive steps, further action is necessary. Member participation and advocacy can significantly influence the progress in resolving this issue

Call to Action:
AIA National urges members to take the following actions:

  1. Write to Members of Congress: Utilize AIA National’s Action Alert to convey the impact of the changes on your firm and emphasize the importance of addressing the issue.
  2. Share your stories: AIA is seeking stories from affected members and firms to highlight the urgency of the issue to Congress. Email Sarah Dodge for further follow-up.
  3. Engage with House Ways and Means Committee and Senate Finance Committee Members: If you have connections with policymakers on these committees, reach out to them. Their support plays a vital role in rectifying this issue.

Your engagement and advocacy are key to achieving a favorable outcome. With possible decisive action in fall 2023, the collective efforts of AIA members can make a significant difference.

Call for Feedback: Updates to Architects are Environmentally Responsible Policy

We are excited to announce that AIA National is undertaking an important initiative to update the Architects are Environmentally Responsible section of the AIA Public Policy statements and accept feedback from members.

Recognizing the urgency of climate action, AIA declared it a priority in 2019. However, the current Architects are Environmentally Responsible policy was last reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors in 2017, predating this priority declaration. To bridge this gap and ensure this policy aligns with recent AIA statements, a subgroup of the Committee on the Environment (COTE) was assigned the task of leading this effort.

Your input is crucial in shaping the direction of this policy. We invite you to review the proposed updates, which are available in two formats: a redlined version highlighting the changes and a  clean version for easy reading.

To provide your feedback, you can send your written comments directly to Anne Law. All feedback must be submitted by the close of business on Thursday, July 27th.

In addition to written feedback, AIA National is hosting virtual Zoom feedback sessions to facilitate interactive discussions. These sessions will provide you with an opportunity to engage with fellow AIA members and share your thoughts on the proposed updates. Join us at the final Zoom feedback session: July 27 (Thurs) 5:00 – 6:30 pm EST/

Please reach out to Anne Law to sign up for any of these sessions.

Design Review Legislative Package Passed by Seattle City Council

Seattle City Council, led by Mayor Bruce Harrell, recently passed a crucial legislative package to address the pressing issue of affordable housing. The initiative aims to boost affordable housing production by streamlining permitting processes, which have been a major bottleneck in construction.

The package consists of two key bills: Council Bill 120591 and Council Bill 120581. Council Bill 120591, now in effect permanently, builds on successful temporary exemptions from design review implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. These exemptions sped up the opening of affordable housing projects, offering much-needed relief to the community. Under the new bill, rental and home-ownership projects with 40% of units affordable at up to 80% of the Area Median Income (AMI) will be exempt from design review. It’s important to note that though design review is no longer mandatory for these projects, they still meet stringent building and land use codes, ensuring high standards for health and safety.

The second bill, Council Bill 120581, introduces temporary provisions to the permit review process, allowing housing projects to meet the City’s Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) requirement through on-site performance, earning an exemption from design review. This bill also permits projects to receive departures from design standards, streamlining the process and facilitating more efficient construction. By eliminating outdated language in the City’s Land Use code, the legislation provides a clearer definition of affordable housing, fostering an environment that encourages more affordable housing developments in Seattle.

The impact of these bills has been met with widespread praise from various organizations and individuals invested in affordable housing. By simplifying the permitting process and providing incentives, the City aims to increase the production of affordable housing and address the critical housing needs of its residents. While more work may still be needed, the approval of these bills represents a significant step forward in tackling Seattle’s affordable housing crisis.

Posted in Advocacy

AIA AHC Summer Happy Hour – Seattle

Join the Seattle AIA Architecture for Health Community to celebrate summer by coming together for a fun-filled networking event!

Date: August 29th, 2023
Time:
4pm – 6pm
Location: 
Andersen Construction – 5601 6th Ave S Suite 550 Seattle, WA 98108

Posted in Architecture for Health Committee

Advocacy Update – June 2023

Call for Feedback: Updates to Architects are Environmentally Responsible Policy

We are excited to announce that AIA National is undertaking an important initiative to update the Architects are Environmentally Responsible section of the AIA Public Policy statements and accept feedback from members.

Recognizing the urgency of climate action, AIA declared it a priority in 2019. However, the current Architects are Environmentally Responsible policy was last reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors in 2017, predating this priority declaration. To bridge this gap and ensure this policy aligns with recent AIA statements, a subgroup of the Committee on the Environment (COTE) was assigned the task of leading this effort.

Your input is crucial in shaping the direction of this policy. We invite you to review the proposed updates, which are available in two formats: a redlined version highlighting the changes and a clean version for easy reading.

To provide your feedback, you can send your written comments directly to Anne Law. All feedback must be submitted by the close of business on Thursday, July 27th.

In addition to written feedback, AIA National is hosting virtual Zoom feedback sessions to facilitate interactive discussions. These sessions will provide you with an opportunity to engage with fellow AIA members and share your thoughts on the proposed updates. We encourage you to participate in one of these sessions to make your voice heard. Here are the details for the Zoom feedback sessions:

July 12 (Wed) 5:00 – 6:30 pm EST
July 18 (Tues) 2:00 – 3:30 pm EST
July 27 (Thurs) 5:00 – 6:30 pm EST

Please reach out to Anne Law to sign up for any of these sessions.

AIA National – Architects in Action Conference

At this 2-day virtual conference, participants hear and learn about state and local legislative trends, meet with colleagues from across the country, and share advocacy-related lessons. Learn more here.

 

OPCD Reschedules Release Date for Draft Plan and DEIS to Early September

The Office of Planning and Community Development (OPCD) has announced a revised release date for the highly anticipated draft Comprehensive Plan and DEIS. Originally slated to be shared in June, the release has now been rescheduled to early September.

OPCD has decided to allocate additional time to complete the draft plan, ensuring that it fully incorporates valuable community input, responds to new state requirements and prepares comprehensive materials for their upcoming fall engagement activities.

The decision to reschedule is driven by OPCD’s commitment to creating a Plan that accurately reflects the aspirations and concerns of the community. By allowing for more time, they aim to carefully integrate the feedback received, address evolving state regulations, and prepare for meaningful engagement in the coming months.

As the release date approaches, members are encouraged to stay engaged in the Comp Plan Work Group and continue offering their perspectives to shape the future of their neighborhoods and environment.

 

AIA Seattle Board of Directors Votes to Endorse Seattle Housing Levy

Based on the recommendation of the Public Policy Board, the AIA Seattle Board of Directors voted to endorse the Seattle Housing Levy. Since its establishment in 1986, the Seattle Housing Levy has played a vital role in addressing the city’s affordable housing challenges. Over the years, it has been a crucial funding mechanism responsible for the creation and preservation of more than 11,000 affordable rental homes and 1,000 opportunities for homeownership.

The Levy takes a strategic approach to combat rising rents, limited housing supply, and homelessness through targeted investments over a seven-year period. Its primary focus areas include the construction of affordable housing, support for homeownership, and preservation of existing units.

With the launch of the 2023 Levy, the goal is to create an additional 3,000 affordable homes, including supportive housing, while also empowering low-income individuals and families through homeownership opportunities. The success of the Levy is evident, as over 95% of households who have received assistance have remained stably housed.

As Seattle faces an ongoing affordable housing crisis and the threat of displacement, the Seattle Housing Levy stands as a proven and indispensable component of the city’s efforts to address these challenges.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Samantha Morrow
Senior Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | samantham@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Culture Change in Practice: A Leadership Cohort 2023

Culture Change in Practice: a Leader Cohort

This four-part, peer-based learning program was designed by a team of architects and allied professionals as a response to racist violence, inequitable firm culture, and a segregated built environment. With the support of our facilitator, Dr. Anu Taranath, this program will provide architecture and allied firms the tools and community to meet the explicit goals and metrics laid out in NOMA NW’s Call-to-Action

The architectural profession is still predominantly white and predominantly male. Of the AIA Seattle’s over 2,600 members, just 30 are Black or African American, and 2 are Indigenous American, while only 32% are women or nonbinary according to AIA members’ self-reported data. Creating culture change within architecture and allied firms is a critical step to creating a more diverse and equitable profession and industry. And through this professional change, we hope to influence broader cultural change, due to the significant role architects play in crafting our physical environment.

This program is created in partnership with NOMA NW, and Planning in Color, and has been selected as a grant award winner for the 2023 Component Grants Program by AIA Trust.

>>> Want to learn more about the program and its impact? Join us at the Culture Change in Practice Mixer on Tuesday, August 15, 5:30-7:30pm PT at The Miller Hull Partnership. Learn more and RSVP here.


TARGET PARTICIPANTS – FIRM LEADERS

We invite a dedicated cohort of 40 firm leaders from the broader AEC industry. This peer-to-peer learning cohort, facilitated by Dr. Anu Taranath, will support firms’ ability to live up to the goals of the Call-to-Action pledge and equip leaders to catalyze change outward in their own firms. 

  • (40) Firm Leaders: lead firms, lead practice groups, lead teams, are direct supervisors, make key decisions and have significant influence and power in shaping the culture and staffing of the firm or projects i.e Principals, Partners, Owners – with the intent of facilitating broader impact within their firms and industry 

Space is limited! 


FULL SERIES COST 

Includes continuing education (12 LU) + light breakfast and refreshments for in person sessions

Per Person (Based on Firm Size)

PLEASE NOTE: Each registration confirms a spot for one individual based on the size of their firm. Up to two (2) individuals per firm may participate in the program. Individual workshop registration is not available.

$500  $575 (per person)  // Firm Size: 1-7 Employees 
$1000  $1,150 (per person) // Firm Size: 8-49 Employees 
$1500  $1,725 (per person)  // Firm Size: 50+ Employees 
$1500  $1,725 (per person) //  CAP Sponsors

Registration has closed

Early Bird Deadline: Register by Monday, August 28 to save 15%
Final Registration Deadline: Monday, September 11

Participants must attend all four courses (September 15, October 6, October 27, November 17, 2023) to receive continuing education credit or a certificate of completion. No partial credit will be awarded. All registration questions can be directed to Andrea Aguilera.

We’re excited to offer virtual and in-person workshops while keeping costs consistent with previous years, thanks to the support of AIA Trust and DLR Group! 

Reduced Rate Options

While we are striving to prevent or minimize the labor that BIPOC firm leaders are often asked to carry out in equity-related conversations, we recognize that our world’s power dynamics may unintentionally arise in this space. With that in mind, we encourage BIPOC and other marginalized participants to submit a reduced rate request. In addition, we recognize this fee may present hardship to some firms who are nevertheless committed to investing in the work. AIA Seattle has reserved limited funds for reduced rate requests, available on a first come, first serve basis (priority given to AIA members). Please submit the Scholarship / Reduced Rate Request Form via email by Monday, August 28, 5:00pm PT. 


MEET THE FACILITATOR

Dr. Anu Taranath, Dr. Anu Consulting: dialogues for justice | Dr. Anu Taranath is a speaker, author, educator, and racial equity consultant who partners with a range of people to deepen conversations on history, harm and healing. A University of Washington Seattle professor for the past 20+ years, Dr. Anu knows that the most compelling conversations on race, identity, power, and belonging take place when people feel valued and heard. She has received the Seattle Weekly’s “Best of Seattle” recognition, the University’s Distinguished Teaching Award, and multiple US Fulbright Fellowships to work abroad. As a consultant she has partnered with over 300 clients from National Geographic Society to the Raging Grannies. Her book “Beyond Guilt Trips: Mindful Travel in an Unequal World” was named a Washington State Book Award Finalist, Newsweek’s Future of Travel Winner in Storytelling, and included in Oprah Magazine’s “Best 26 Travel Books of All Times.” Visit www.anutaranath.com to learn more.


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Cohort participants commit to engaging in all four sessions, understanding that the content is designed sequentially for cohort-based learning. All sessions subject to change.

September 15, 9am-12pm PT | Workshop 1: Power and Privilege | In-Person @ DLR Group (51 University St #600)

We will get to know one another in this session, and learn about the equity journeys of the firms represented. What are some of the general barriers to equity work? How might we handle discomfort in productive ways? How does a deeper awareness of our positionality in relation to others help us develop a responsibility toward stewardship, especially as leaders in our firm? This first workshop will explore what exactly equity stewardship looks like, especially since some firm leaders’ life experiences might look quite different from those on whose behalf they are advocating.

October 6, 9am-12pm PT | Workshop 2: Conflict Transformations | Online

Conflict is often seen as a barrier and obstacle to progress. We will unpack how we approach conflict, reframe these moments as opportunities to grow and better ourselves with practical skills and tools. Importantly, psychological safety is often a precursor to enable us to have tough conversations and navigate conflict with more stability and strategy. The better we are able to manage our feelings and navigate conflict, the more psychological safely we can enjoy. This second workshop will help build more connections between equity work, anti-racism, emotional literacy and leadership strategies.

October 27, 9am-12pm PT | Workshop 3: The Value Case and Business Case for Equity Work | Online

This third workshop will offer practical reasons why equity work makes sense for a firm’s overall culture and business. We will help participants define and more intentionally cultivate a safe/safer space for BIPOC and all staff, and to better understand how and why BIPOC comfort, thriving and success is “good for business” and indeed, integral for firm-wide success.

November 17, 9am-12pm PT | Workshop 4: Initiatives and Impact | In-Person @ DLR Group (51 University St #600)

This final workshop will serve as an opportunity for cohort members to collaborate and speak together based on the work their firm is doing around equity initiatives. We will share strategies and create foundations for collaboration. We’ll discuss how we measure impact and long-range success, and track our hopes and progress together.

In-person sessions (1 + 4) include an optional networking hour from 12-1pm. Guiding questions, readings, and/or worksheets may be sent to participants prior to, and following, each session. 


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Examine how inequitable firm management and top-down practices are resulting in negative design outcomes that impact the health and well-being of communities.
  • Share best practices around mentorship and paths-to-leadership for BIPOC and other historically marginalized people who are not typically seen in leadership positions in architecture and allied professions.
  • Explore how to navigate one’s own positioning of power and privilege through equity stewardship and responsible practice.
  • Expand leadership capacities by understanding conflict skills, emotional literacy, and psychological safety to transform project team collaboration.
  • Understand how and why BIPOC comfort, thriving, and success is “good for business,” integral to firm-wide growth, and directly correlated to meaningful engagement with the communities we’re designing for.
  • Develop skills and language to weave JEDI and anti-racism into project work – to better equip architects to prioritize the diverse social, physical, and emotional needs of occupants.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2023 CULTURE CHANGE SPONSORS

Sponsored by Parker, Smith & Feek, Victor, the CNA Insurance Companies, and The AIA Trust, providers of the AIA Trust Professional Liability Insurance Program.


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PLANNING TEAM

Whitney Lewis Assoc. AIA, Diversity Roundtable/JE:DI Council/AIA Board of Directors/GGLO  |  Susan Frieson AIA, Diversity Roundtable/JE:DI Council/NOMA NW/AIA Membership Advancement Committee/ Weber Thompson Kristen Riley Assoc. AIA, LMN Architects Meredith Everist AIA, AIA Past Board of Directors/Baylis Architects Jennie C. Li, Planning in Color Marijana Misic AIA, AIA Board of Directors/Mahlum Leon Holloway, NOMA NW/DLR Group  |  Alyssa M. Mitchell, Assoc. AIA, Weber Thompson  |  Shweta Sinha, AIA, Schemata Workshop Lisa Morgenroth, AIA


PAST FIRM PARTICIPANTS

Architects Without Borders – Seattle | Arup | AssuredPartners | B+H Advance Strategy | Bassetti Architects | Berger Partnership | Betts, Patterson & Mines, P.S. | BuildingWork | Coughlin Porter Lundeen | DLR Group | Dykeman | Environmental Works | FSi Engineers | GGLO | HEWITT | Integrus Architecture | Johnston Architects | KPFF | Mahlum | McGranahan Architects | MG2  | Mithun | Nakano Associates  | NBBJ | Olson Kundig | Perkins+Will | Rice Fergus Miller, Inc | Schemata Workshop | Schreiber Starling Whitehead Architects | SHKS Architects | Signal Architecture + Research | Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects | The Miller Hull Partnership | third place design cooperative | VIA Architecture | Weber Thompson | Weinstein A+U | Weisman Design Group

 + Will you join this list? 


Registration or Credit Questions?
Contact Andrea Aguilera, Senior Programs Coordinator at AIA Seattle

Program Questions?
Contact Zoe Guckenheimer, Programs Manager at AIA Seattle

Sponsorship Questions?
Contact Melissa K. Neher, Executive Director at AIA Seattle

Posted in Allied Professionals, Architects, Associates, For the Profession, For the Public, Member Firms, Racial Justice Working Group, Uncategorized

Board of Directors Nominations 2023

Please vote for the 2023 slate of Board of Directors and Officers. by July 14.

AIA Seattle’s Board Nominating Committee is pleased to present this slate of accomplished members to fill open seats on our Board of Directors or current board members moving to officer positions or different positions beginning September 1, 2023. All AIA and Associate AIA members are eligible to vote. Votes are yes or no for each nominee, and write-in votes are allowed. Voting by at least 10% of the membership is required to validate an election, so please use the vote button below to make sure your voice is heard. 

Vote now!

Click here to vote

Matt Hutchins AIA, CPHD – (President-Elect) 2023 – 2024

Matt Hutchins AIA headshot

Matt is a founding Principal of CAST Architecture with a focus on creative infill housing as the nexus of low-carbon living, urban vitality, and social policy. Matt serves as a Director of Public Policy on the AIA Seattle Board of Directors and as the Strategic Councilor for AIA Washington Council. He has co-chaired AIA Seattle’s Housing Task Force and organized many public programs on urban design, housing, and accessory dwelling units. He was named AIA Seattle’s Volunteer of the Year in2020. Matt is a Seattle Planning Commissioner and Co-Chair of the Housing and Neighborhoods Committee. In 2017, he co-founded MOAR (More Options for Accessory Residences), a grassroots organization that helped pass Seattle’s landmark ADU reform. Seattle Magazine named Matt one of the 35 Most Influential People in 2019.

 

Mitch Smith AIA – (Director, Development) 2023 – 2026

An influential, organizational strategist, Mitch Smith knows how to push boundaries and help people achieve new heights of success. As one of the first 20 employees to join MG2, Mitch quickly rose from Project Manager to CEO and Chairman of the Board by expanding the firm’s approach to the practice of architecture. Mitch helps people build meaningful connections between their capabilities and an organization’s goals. This ability, along with his unfaltering candor, cultivates a winning culture founded on the right people, strategies, and client commitment. When he isn’t shaping the voice of MG2, you can find Mitch on his motorcycle, exploring the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest, and traveling with his family.

 

Laura Ovsak RA, AIA, NCARB, LEED Green Assoc – (Director, Pro-Practice) 2023 – 2026

Laura is an Architect and a Project Manager at GLY Construction with 11 years of combined experience in Design and Construction Management. Her multilingual and cultural backgrounds have helped ground her beliefs in connecting people and the importance of staying true to your values. An East Coast transplant, Laura aims to bridge the gap between what it means to be a maker of space and a builder.

 

 

 

Kara Weaver, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C – (Affiliate Director, Pro-Practice) 2023 – 2026

Kara has over ten years of experience designing and documenting public projects ranging from conceptual and interpretive master plans to precise detailing and tight grading over structure. She shines on projects that pose complex challenges, requires intensive coordination between disciplines, and provide opportunities for innovative and elegant problem-solving. Her design approach is grounded in her academic studies in anthropology, archeology, and textiles; a background that focuses  her exploration of the layers of meaning inherent in every place and their expression in the design of the physical world.

 

 

Dylan Glosecki AIA, LEED AP B+C – (Director, Public Policy) 2023 – 2026

Dylan is an architect and urban designer focused on molding the built environment into inspirational, pedestrian-centered spaces in sync with nature’s systems. He has 17 years of experience designing urban multifamily housing of all scales, from 50-story high-rises to 3-story apartments, along with transit and urban design work in Seattle and Vancouver, BC. Dylan practices urban design and architecture at VIAPerkins Eastman and co-chairs the AIA Seattle Urban Design Forum, where he studies urban policy as a means to drive sustainable regional growth patterns. Dylan served as vice chair of the Swedish Cherry Hill Hospital Master Plan Citizens Advisory Committee and has participated on various AIA Seattle committees over the past 8 years, including the Housing Taskforce, Public Policy Board, and the Comp Plan Workgroup.

His recent passion project has been mapping Seattle’s neighborhood centers that exist outside of the city’s Urban Villages and Centers as a means of establishing a baseline understanding of Seattle’s obscure network of smaller-scale neighborhoods for use in advocacy efforts during the current Seattle Comprehensive Plan update. He has a BA in Architecture from Clemson and an M.Arch degree from the University of Washington and is LEED AP BD+C certified.

Posted in For the Profession

Advocacy Update – May 2023

Seattle City Council Passes Tree Ordinance

Latest Housing Taskforce advocacy efforts: We are thrilled to announce that the Seattle City Council has passed the long-awaited tree ordinance, marking a significant milestone in our mission to strike a balance between housing needs and the preservation of our beloved trees.

The passage of this ordinance, with a 6-1 vote in favor, is a testament to the hard work and dedication of our members and supporters. Throughout the process, we have been actively engaged in shaping this legislation to ensure it addresses both the urgent need for housing and the crucial importance of protecting our tree canopy.

While we acknowledge that the tree ordinance is not without its imperfections, it represents a substantial step forward in safeguarding our city’s green spaces. Our goal has always been to find a balanced approach that allows for sustainable development while preserving our natural environment.

This comprehensive ordinance will regulate and protect tens of thousands more trees, while also introducing new requirements for replacing those that are cut down. By doing so, we are creating a framework that encourages responsible development practices and ensures the long-term health of our neighborhoods.

We are immensely proud of our members’ engagement throughout this process. Your participation in public comment sessions and your valuable insights have played a pivotal role in achieving this milestone. Together, we are making a tangible difference in shaping a sustainable and livable future for our city.

AIA Seattle Comp Plan Work Group

The Comprehensive Plan update for Seattle is a critical milestone in shaping the city’s future growth and addressing key questions around equitable opportunity, neighborhood design, and sustainability. The AIA Seattle Comp Plan Work Group has been actively collaborating to contribute their skills and experiences to inform the development of the Comprehensive Plan. As part of this important work, UDF will be hosting a charette to support the Comp Plan Work Group in activating member engagement.

When: July 13th 4:00-6:15 PM
Where: Center for Architecture and Design, 1010 Western Ave
More information to follow.

HDC Housing Levy Rally

Join HDC for a rally in support of the Seattle Housing Levy, followed by the final public hearing held by the Seattle City Council Select Committee on the 2023 Housing Levy. May 31st – Seattle City Hall:
3:30pm – Rally for the Seattle Housing Levy
4:00pm – Press conference
4:30pm – Public hearing

State Level

In the final Capital Budget agreement, the proposed funding of $250,000 to establish a workgroup to study the transition to a six-year code cycle was vetoed by Governor Inslee. This decision aligns with our state-level advocacy against extending the code cycle and represents a significant win. This veto preserved the existing three-year code cycle, ensuring the continued application of cutting-edge technologies for safety, health, and efficiency in new construction.

Extending the time between code updates would have had far-reaching consequences, impacting our ability to apply the latest and best practices in construction. It could have also jeopardized the Legislature’s mandate to reduce energy use by 70% by 2031, a critical goal for our state’s sustainability efforts. By maintaining the three-year code cycle, we ensure that necessary updates can be implemented efficiently, promoting energy efficiency and meeting our environmental targets.

Building Code Delays

The State Building Code Council (SBCC) in Washington has voted to delay the effective date of the 2021 building codes by 120 days. The new effective date will be October 29, 2023, instead of July 1, 2023. This delay provides stakeholders with additional time to prepare for the implementation of the updated codes. Additionally, the SBCC has directed its staff to form Technical Advisory Groups to consider proposals for modifying sections of the commercial and residential energy codes. These modifications aim to address legal uncertainties following the recent court decision in California Restaurant Association v. City of Berkeley. The SBCC staff will compile these proposals for the Council’s future consideration. Stay tuned for further updates as the process unfolds.


We’d love to hear from you! To comment or for more information on these or any other topics, please contact:

Samantha Morrow
Senior Manager of Policy & Advocacy
AIA Seattle & AIA Washington Council
206-957-1926 | samantham@aiaseattle.org

Posted in Advocacy

Call for Individual Award Nominations

call for individual nominations

Now is the time to reflect on individuals that have inspired you in your practice, that have made a tremendous impact on our communities, and have uplifted the values of a just and equitable world. We encourage you to nominate a peer or yourself for any of the awards below:

AIA SEATTLE INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

AIA Seattle has a long tradition of recognizing individuals and organizations for their outstanding achievements in support of the profession of architecture and the AIA.

To be included in the 2023 awards cycle, please submit your nominations no later than Friday, July 21, 2023. Nominations received after this date will not be included. The AIA Seattle Fellows and Honors Committee begins their review of awards nominations in July and will follow-up with next steps for selected candidates in August.

Individual Awardees will be honored at AIA Seattle’s annual Parti celebration in January 2024. Stay tuned in the coming months for a save-the-date!

NATIONAL HONORS
AIA National hosts its own array of honors and awards for members. More information on which awards are currently open for submission can be found here – and award criteria, schedules, deadlines, and how to nominate can be found here.
Posted in Fellows and Honors

Advocacy Update – April 2023

STATE NEWS

2023 Legislative Session

We have reached the final weeks of the 105-day state legislative session. Tuesday, April 4, was the opposite house fiscal committee cut-off, where all bills that passed the House needed to be out of their Senate fiscal committee, and all bills that passed the Senate needed to be out of their House fiscal committee to remain alive. The legislation that advanced currently sits in the Rules Committee of the respective chamber, where members will select which bills to pull to the floor for a vote.  All bills must fully pass out of their opposite chamber by April 12th to have the opportunity to move forward this year. As a reminder, all bills deemed “necessary to implement the budget” are not subject to these cut-offs. They remain in play through the last day of the session, April 23. Many of our priority bills made it through and are still in play, including middle housing, climate updates to the GMA, and clean energy siting.

March Revenue Forecast

On March 20, the state’s Economic and Revenue Forecast Council released its most recent revenue forecast, which the final state budgets will be based on. The forecast showed that over the next two years, the state is likely to bring in less revenue than predicted in November. In fact, the forecast of funds is $483 million less than expected for the 2023-25 biennium and $541 million less for the 2025-27 biennium. This is attributed to a decline in residential construction, slower growth in personal income, and high inflation. The March forecast is used as a guide for budget writers as they finish crafting their respective budget proposals for the upcoming biennium. We expect this forecast to have an impact on state spending.

Budgets
Operating:

The Senate Ways and Means Committee Operating Budget proposal introduced by Chair Christine Rolfes passed on a bipartisan 40-9 vote. The $69.2 billion, two-year budget increases funding for vital state services, including targeted support for behavioral health, public schools, housing, and homelessness, and a historic investment to address the climate crisis. The two-year operating budget adds roughly $5 billion in new spending and does not rely on any new general taxes or fees. It leaves more than $3 billion in total reserves to guard against an economic slowdown.

The House budget introduced by House Appropriations Committee Chair Timm Ormsby appropriates $69.5 billion for the 2023-25 biennium. Also referred to as “Resilient Washington”, the proposal is viewed by House Democrats as both responsible and sustainable. It maintains critical investments made over the last few years and increases support for K-12 education, workforce development, and poverty reduction. It also prioritizes maintaining funding and programs expanded during the pandemic to protect the most vulnerable Washingtonians.

Notably, the budget makes significant investments in climate and natural resource priorities through Climate Commitment Act spending:
• $316 million in Climate Commitment Act investments
• $45 million for forest health and wildfire protection

• $25 million for biodiversity protection

Capital:

The House Democrats proposed capital budget would fund a record-breaking $8.3 billion in construction projects throughout the state, including $704 million dedicated to affordable housing and home upgrades as well as $318 million for clean energy and climate projects.

The Senate Democrats’ $7.9 billion proposed capital budget, which passed out of the Senate with unanimous support, makes historic investments in affordable housing, behavioral health, environmental protection, school construction, and public safety. Notable investments include $400 million for the Housing Trust Fund, part of a total of $625 million for housing investments, and $100 million for school construction in small rural and tribal districts.

Transportation:

House Transportation Committee Chair Jake Fey released his proposal for the second supplemental transportation budget for the 2021-23 biennium, which would spend $10.3 billion, and the new transportation budget for the 2023-25 fiscal biennium, which would spend $13.6 billion. This budget puts significant funding toward eliminating major highway project delays, reducing carbon emissions as part of the Climate Commitment Act, improving traffic safety, and investing in our state ferry system.

Senate Transportation Committee Chair Marko Liias released his proposal for the second supplemental transportation budget for the 2021-23 biennium, which would spend $10.6 billion, and the new transportation budget for the 2023-25 fiscal biennium, which would spend $12.9 billion. Much like the proposal in the House, the Senate proposal focuses on traffic safety, workforce expansion in the state patrol and ferry system, electrification, transit, and other green investments and keeps work on schedule for transportation projects big and small throughout Washington.

Read more about this month’s Advocacy Updates here.

For questions about any of these bills or other legislation under consideration, contact Samantha Morrow.

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

Advocacy Update – February 2023

March 2023 Advocacy Update

STATE NEWS

State Legislative Session Update
Washington’s State Legislature is back in person and moving through the long 105 day session at an effective pace. This year there have been well over 1,500 bills introduced so far. While the legislation in Olympia covers a wide variety of issues, the bills this year seem to be heavily focused on a few key priorities: addressing the housing shortage, creating the biennial budget, criminal justice reform, nurse staffing, and climate change.

Housing
Housing supply and affordability remains a top priority. As we approach the end of week 8, a number of bills pertaining to the creation of housing in the form of ADUs and use of existing buildings have been the first to be voted off the Floor. These bills have seen broad bipartisan support, signaling a legislative body united in addressing the housing crisis in our state.

Session Milestones
The legislative calendar has passed its first two cut-off deadlines: bills that failed to pass out of their policy committees by Feb. 17 are dead for the year, as are bills that did not pass out of their fiscal committees by Feb. 24. At this time all bills must be in one of three places:

  • In the house of origin Rules Committee, which determines which bills make it to the house of origin floor for a vote;
  • On the schedule for a floor vote in the house of origin; or
  • In the second house, having passed out of the house of origin.

Practice
The release of the revenue forecast is expected in March. Once made public, the House and Senate will release their respective Capital, Operating, and Transportation budget proposals for the 2023-25 biennium. This year, the House is expected to release their budget first, with the Senate following soon after. Once both chambers release their proposed budgets, robust negotiations will begin and continue for many weeks. As it stands, the biggest uncertainty as it relates to the state budget is the new capital gains tax currently being collected by the state. This tax is expected to generate hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for things such as early learning and childcare. Currently, the capital gains tax is being challenged in the state Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court strikes down the tax, it will result in a substantial hole in the budget.

Read the entire Advocacy Update here.

For questions about any of these bills or other legislation under consideration, contact Samantha Morrow.

Posted in Advocacy, Public Policy Board

2023 Fellowship Announcement

Bill LaPatra FAIA, LEED AP, is a design partner at Mithun with 40 years of experience leading higher education, civic, commercial, and corporate workplace projects. His diverse body of work includes the mixed-use Weyerhaeuser Headquarters in Seattle’s Pioneer Square; the Princeton University Meadows Graduate Student Housing, which is among the largest Passive House projects in the country; and the award-winning and LEED Platinum-certified UC Irvine Mesa Court Towers living-learning community.

In particular, Bill is known for advancing the design of student life facilities nationally through holistic support for students’ academic and social development, deep green building performance, and championship of design excellence within alternative delivery models (including design-build and P3 partnerships). He is a regular conference presenter, joining with housing professionals, contractors, engineers, and developers to share lessons learned and exemplary models for design-forward collaboration within alternative delivery.

Join us in congratulating Bill!

Posted in Fellows and Honors